GM Volt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 85 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After installing solar PV a few years ago, we went to try out a volt and unexpectedly loved it and bought a 2014 new. A couple of years later, traded that for a 2017 with ACC and all the safety features. Again loved that car. Over time though the inexplicable decisions about features of the Volt became more and more annoying. Styling, visibility, chrome on the dash, convoluted driver interface, bouncy poorly damped suspension, severe torque steer in some situations and so forth. But they really were the gateway drug for my wife and I as far as electric vehicles go. But we always had to use gas for longer trips while we were passing Tesla superchargers along the way.

So we reserved a Model 3 in on March 31, 2016 to a large extent because the Volt had brought us into accepting EV's. Seeing all the superchargers eliminated our apprehension about range. We never were interested in the $35k cars but looking at the tesla options list on the S I estimated that what we would want should be about 60k before rebates and that is what it has turned out to be. Our original plan was to keep the Gen 2 volt along with the model 3, but after driving the Model 3 for a month we decided that since neither of us wanted to drive the Volt, we needed a second model 3 and reserved one at the end of May, ordering it at the end of June and taking delivery yesterday.

This is not to compare directly the Volt and the Model 3 as they are quite different in price. The Model 3 is a much better and beautifully engineered vehicle which is much simpler than the Volt but it also costs a lot more. The Volt is a great gateway drug with a lot of questionable decisions made in reaching its final form but is a good car. I could say that the controls and screen on the Model 3 and more intuitive and accessible than those on the Volt, but most of you guys without experience would claim that wasn't possible.

I originally joined and stayed a member for information on the Volt. More recently I've taken to defending Tesla and the Model 3 from the rampant misperceptions found here. This hasn't been very rewarding as in general members here have been uninterested in learning what its really like to drive a Model 3 for long distances, attributing positive comments to "new owner syndrome". I admire Scott's persistence but I'm afraid that it's not very rewarding to me to hand around here. I hope GM decides to make great BEV's but then I hope that Hell freezes over too.

So, goodbye, its been interesting and at times helpful.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,211 Posts
I completely on the Volt being a gateway drug to full EV. It helps eliminate the fear people have about EV range/recharging, driving experience, etc. It also help refine the driver's actual range needs without being up the creek without a paddle (no charge).

It's for this reason that I think more EREV's like the Volt will be a very good way to wean people off ICE's. Many are simply not ready to go cold turkey with an EV. The ICE is a safety blanket that does indeed eliminate range anxiety, which was it's purpose.

Enjoy you new BEV's. My wife and I do enjoy the Bolt EV. But without the Volt, it may have taken me longer to get one. Having both a Volt and a Bolt works very well for us, and at an affordable price.

As far as Tesla, I'm more anti-Musk hype than anti-Tesla. I've ridden in Scott's Model X, it's a cool car, I liked it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,464 Posts
I originally joined and stayed a member for information on the Volt. More recently I've taken to defending Tesla and the Model 3 from the rampant misperceptions found here. This hasn't been very rewarding as in general members here have been uninterested in learning what its really like to drive a Model 3 for long distances, attributing positive comments to "new owner syndrome". I admire Scott's persistence but I'm afraid that it's not very rewarding to me to hand around here. I hope GM decides to make great BEV's but then I hope that Hell freezes over too.
Replace "Model 3" with "Bolt EV" and I feel very similarly, but your last sentence that I bolded saves me time in elaborating.

Bye.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,217 Posts
In Canada, we really do not have a super charger network so phev is the only practical way to go for long distance travel. A Tesla would get you from London Ontario to Windsor Ontario but only part way back. Then it is an overnighter waiting to charge. Normally it would be a 4hour round trip for an ICE or phev.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,574 Posts
Enjoy the Tesla. BEVs will become more and more popular in the coastal megalopolis, but for those of us in the middle of the country we'll need to continue with EREVs and other hybrids. The charging infrastructure will be built out where the population is long before it's built out in the rest of the country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
If there were a practical way to pour human waste into the tank and run it cleanly......I'd be all over it. Converting all of the landfill garbage to a clean fuel would also be awesome.....BUT, it appears that running a pure BEV is still the best available option for now.
If I manage to live another 25 years.......I wonder what we'll be running on then?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
I was going to attach a photo I took in London, last week, just off Wonderland @ the TD chargers by Timmie's - 3 Volts in a row about 9 am. Can't get it to D/L.
One Volt was fully charged so I unplugged & plugged mine in. A VERY busy location. Saw several models of PHEV's over the week we were there. Fortunately, I had no range anxiety like I would have had with a Tesla (I was originally going to purchase a TM3 AWD ER). TM3 is a nice car and I am glad the guy I bought the Volt from got one, as it allowed me to experience how awesome the Volt is. Went to a family reunion and found out a cousin also has a Volt. Same colour too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,828 Posts
The OP's opinion and choices are his own. Now when posting on a forum, it shouldn't be surprising that there would be discussion and opposing opinions. If someone can't tolerate dissention, I'm guessing this is the wrong forum (Is there a right one?). As I've said a number of times, if I decide to leave a forum, I'll just stop posting. I doubt if I disappear they'll be much of a search or demand for an explanation of why I'm not posting on the forum any more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Enjoy your M3s. They are amazing cars, there are so many people with opinions on them yet they have never driven one. What is interesting is how rare people are that have driven them and didn't like them. The car is a revolution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
In Canada, we really do not have a super charger network so phev is the only practical way to go for long distance travel. A Tesla would get you from London Ontario to Windsor Ontario but only part way back. Then it is an overnighter waiting to charge. Normally it would be a 4hour round trip for an ICE or phev.
Where you live makes all the difference in the world about when it will be practical to buy a BEV. Californians enjoy both good supercharger coverage and good weather so buying a BEV, especially a Tesla, is a relatively easy choice. For you in Ontario there are only a few superchargers and of course you have famously bad weather, and by that I mean cold weather because heaters suck a lot of energy and batteries don't work nearly as well when they are cold. I'm in the middle, New England, we have real winters but not quite as bad as yours and our supercharger rollout seems to be a year or two ahead of yours. I've been monitoring the Tesla supercharger map ever since I bought the Volt to see when a Tesla would be practical for me. Vermont has had several supercharger locations for at least a year, and they are in the right places, but Maine didn't get lit up until about three weeks ago. Now Maine has enough superchargers in the right places that I could go to all of the places that we normally go to. However we do pop up to Canada every now and then, at the end of the month we are driving to Prince Edward Island, so I've recently looked at the map for Canada. Going to Quebec in a Tesla is doable but our PEI trip isn't possible yet. There are a number of planned superchargers in the Maritimes but none have been installed yet, for PEI they don't even have any planned sites at the moment. In planning this trip I looked at Plugshare to see if there are any motels with EVSEs because it would be nice if I could plug my Volt in. Unfortunately there are only a couple of motels on PEI that have charging and they weren't available so this trip wouldn't be doable in a Tesla without having made reservations much earlier than we made ours. I'll seriously consider a Model 3 next year, but not before then. Not only do I want to see the supercharger network further expanded, I also want Tesla's manufacturing problems to be well behind them. I also want to see what Chevy comes out with, but I'm not sure they plan on anything more before 2020 and I'd rather not wait that long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Hey Foxtrot, sorry to see you go, but totally understand.
Pretty sure our next vehicle will be a battery EV especially if the infrastructure is in place for long trips (big edge to Tesla on this one at the current time).
There are a lot of plans in place to improve and increase the charging infrastructure.
Not sure when our next purchase is going to happen exactly, could be a few years, could be a few months, if my commute mileage were to increase suddenly. If we purchase sooner, it could be a Model 3, but I would have to test drive one first (as well as a Chevy Bolt or any other I might want to look at), a little old school that way. Plus the wife would insist on it too.

Part of the battle here comes from the fact that there are GM fans here that compete with other brands, which is understandable, but I like to look at the bigger picture which is seeing the new technology become a reality and how this benefits the greater good. And there are a number of people here who like Tesla vehicles, and also those that see the big picture.

I hope GM decides to make great BEV's but then I hope that Hell freezes over too.
This is a big and complex topic. The Bolt was a nice effort, and shows GM is a front runner in this sector. But at the end of the day, I just don't know if GM can get out of its own way ...

I made a decision around 2005 when we were about to purchase our next vehicle, not to purchase a new vehicle until the collective "they" started making a vehicle I was really interested in (pretty peeved at GM for dropping the EV1, CEO Rick Wagoner admitted axing the EV1 was his worst decision as CEO). Long story short I milked out another 9 years on our existing vehicles, until there were some options I would consider purchasing. The future looks super bright in this regard. Maybe some of us will catch you on the flip side in a Tesla forum, or some other forum we didn't even think we would be part of ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
A big reason we bought our Volt was to reduce our carbon footprint. It is what we could afford and made the most sense for our needs too.

I'm all in favor of Teslas and Leafs and Ionics and the Prius and anything else that is a step in the right direction. EV, PHEV and even Hybrid.

Whatever you can afford and whatever works for you. If it reduces your carbon footprint that's the bottom line for me, not who made it.

Enjoy your M3!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I hope the OP enjoys his M3. I'm pretty sure he will. As a Bolt owner I'm envious of the Supercharger network. The Bolt is my commuter car and probably would have been our trip car too, but the charging infrastructure in the US, at least outside of California, varies from bad to nonexistent. I love the Bolt and it's a great car, but I'm not all convinced that GM has the slightest interest in selling them. When it came time to replace my wife's 20yr old beater, we when with the Volt. It lets her drive almost entirely on battery, and we will be taking a 2000 mi. trip in it soon. BEV's are great, but for any anything other than a Tesla they aren't suitable for anything more than a day trip unless you have a lot of time and are willing to do a lot of planning. BTW with almost all driving on battery, the Volt is reporting 150mpge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,464 Posts
BEV's are great, but for any anything other than a Tesla they aren't suitable for anything more than a day trip unless you have a lot of time and are willing to do a lot of planning.
That's exactly why I do what I do. If an oaf like me can make long-distance trips in the Bolt EV quickly with few sacrifices, imagine what the average person could do? They might not even need a Tesla.
 

·
Registered
2017 Volt Premier 90k+ Miles
Joined
·
829 Posts
... BEV's are great, but for any anything other than a Tesla they aren't suitable for anything more than a day trip unless you have a lot of time and are willing to do a lot of planning.
The closed proprietary Tesla only Supercharger network is great. However I don't want multiple closed and separate charging networks run by Tesla, Chevy, or anyone else. I wouldn't want the automakers controlling all the gas stations for that matter either. It would just be inconvenient and non-competative. Businesses will add CCS chargers as the demand exists, which will increase as more EVs are sold. Now if they want to add stations and charge the fee for use that's fine, provided the stations are open to all. Long term, it's the better way forward. Short term, the built out is slow. In Florida the CCS network can now finally handle all my long distance driving needs, for the next time I'm in the market for an EV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Imagine what would have happened if GM could only gas up at Esso, Ford at Chevron and Chrysler at Shell. We might have been driving electric cars for the last 100 years. Things would go a lot faster if there was a standard connector with maybe two or three charge speeds, slow for PHEV's which could be charged or free, typically found at destination sites like malls, parking structures where the cars would be typically left for an hour or more, medium and high speed for on the road, cross country travel for those that need charging quickly during a rest stops/food breaks etc. Piecemeal non compatible charging is counter intuitive. Legislation is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
Imagine what would have happened if GM could only gas up at Esso, Ford at Chevron and Chrysler at Shell. We might have been driving electric cars for the last 100 years. Things would go a lot faster if there was a standard connector with maybe two or three charge speeds, slow for PHEV's which could be charged or free, typically found at destination sites like malls, parking structures where the cars would be typically left for an hour or more, medium and high speed for on the road, cross country travel for those that need charging quickly during a rest stops/food breaks etc. Piecemeal non compatible charging is counter intuitive. Legislation is needed.
There is a standard, CCS, and in the long run it will win because industry standards always win. However we are in an interim period where Tesla's proprietary network has a huge advantage. I have no doubt that 10 years from now Tesla's will have industry standard plugs and they will be in the process of shutting down their charging network because at that point it will just be an expense and no longer give them an advantage. However in the next five years their network gives them an advantage because they have a planned network whereas the other networks are more haphazardly placed. Also in the short term basic economics works against the independent charging companies. The problem is that there aren't enough electric cars on the roads for them to make any money. Tesla's network is paid for by the sales of Tesla cars, that model works at the moment because the base price of their cars is $50K and most sell for much more than that. ChargePoint and EVGO have to make money on their charge stations so I suspect they are only putting them in places where someone else is paying for the installation, shopping malls, garages where the owner wants to appear to be green, not where they will do the most good such as highways. The VW Electrify America program will put DC Fast chargers in useful places, but they are just starting out and once they've meet their commitment they won't be rolling out any more, however by that time I think that the market will support the EVGOs and Chargepoint's of the world and the industry standard networks will start to pick up momentum. Eventually there will be more CCS chargers around and Tesla's private network will be superfluous, but the tipping point for that is at least 5 years away and maybe as much as 10.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Imagine what would have happened if GM could only gas up at Esso, Ford at Chevron and Chrysler at Shell. We might have been driving electric cars for the last 100 years. Things would go a lot faster if there was a standard connector with maybe two or three charge speeds, slow for PHEV's which could be charged or free, typically found at destination sites like malls, parking structures where the cars would be typically left for an hour or more, medium and high speed for on the road, cross country travel for those that need charging quickly during a rest stops/food breaks etc. Piecemeal non compatible charging is counter intuitive. Legislation is needed.
+1. Proprietary technology can go only so far. Time to standardize.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,211 Posts
I have no doubt that 10 years from now Tesla's will have industry standard plugs and they will be in the process of shutting down their charging network because at that point it will just be an expense and no longer give them an advantage.

I'm not sure, perhaps they will simply be like the airlines frequent flier clubs where you can relax, read the paper, get some work done, have some food/drink. Compare that to a charge station outside a drug store. Then again, a CCS at a toll road service center would be similar to the Tesla experience. Regardless, a Tesla would simply have that many more options for charging.

The thing I wonder about for a CCS network is reliability: is the station operating? I suspect Tesla maintains their stations pretty well.

So while an independent network will grow over time, it may not be as uniform, maintained, or convenient as Tesla's, and a Tesla driver will still have both to choose from. Not that I'll ever pay the price to get a Tesla, but having Tesla charge stations is a nice bonus/option.
 
1 - 20 of 85 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top