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GM announced its new and proprietary Ultium batteries with 60% more capacity for power than the current batteries used in the Chevrolet Bolt. The large-format, pouch-style cells can be stacked vertically or horizontally allowing for different designs of vehicles and different power ranges.

The batteries will be made near Lordstown, Ohio, in a GM and LG Chem partnership. Ground breaking on the plant will be this spring. The plant will be about the size of 30 football fields. GM is spending $2.3 Billion on this plant.

Energy options range from 50 to 200 kWh, with a potential driving range of up to 400 miles or more on a full charge. 0 to 60 mph in 3 seconds is also be claimed by GM. The new battery is designed for Level 2 and DC fast charging. Many of the new EV's announced and displayed at the analyst event will have 400-volt battery packs and up to 200kW fast-charging capability. The truck platform will have 800-volt battery packs and 350 kW fast-charging capability.

Most EV batteries today are made with NCM — nickel, cobalt, and magnesium. GM's new Ultium battery chemistry reduces the expensive cobalt by 70% and will add aluminum, so these will be NCMA.

Each battery module will have a dedicated battery-management-system. This will allow an individual module to be replaced with a new one. This also opens to the opportunity for different chemistries to be used within a pack.

In conjunction with the new battery, GM has developed new electric motors intended for use of one, two, or three motors in a vehicle, thus supporting front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive, and performance all-wheel drive. The front-wheel motor is rated at 180 kilowatts (241 hp), and the rear motor produces 250 kilowatts (335 hp).

GM also slashed the amount of EV wiring in the drivetrain by 80% compared to the today's Chevy Bolt.

By slashing the expensive Cobalt, reducing wiring and continuing manufacturing improvements, GM says it will get under the $100 per kilowatt-hour cost barrier where EV's become cost competitive with ICE's. The Bolt is currently a money loser apparently.

Of course the next question is when will all this reach the market. Based on the other announcements, the new EV's will start being revealed this year and they have a 5 year rollout schedule . So soon, but not as soon as many would like, of course.
 

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Chevy: When my Gen II's powertrain is worn out, upgrade my Volt to 100KWhr, por favor :)
 
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