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Does the skateboard concept mean that most servicing will have to be done at the factory? What other than windshield wiper blades and some lightbulbs can be serviced locally? If I need a 12V battery or wire replacement or A/C recharging will I have to wait for a month? Will the dealer supply a loaner? Will I have to pay to have it shipped to and back from Michigan? How long will it take for dealerships to get the special lifts needed to disassemble the body?

Interesting questions. I would like to have some hint of these issues now and not be shocked later.
 

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Actually there is a hint in this story:

http://gm-volt.com/2008/06/09/this-history-of-the-chevy-volt-have-they-made-a-huge-mistake/

Where the engineer is talking about the frame of the car and the issues they have to face.

I believe the battery will be fix from the bottom and will be remove the same way. It could actually be quick to replace it.

But the issue is the frame, how do make it rigid and safe with a big hole in the middle for the battery.
 

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Does the skateboard concept mean that most servicing will have to be done at the factory?
There is no skateboard. Somebody has gotten people confused. The skateboard was GMs 2002 hydrogen fuel cell concept called Hy-Wire. It has nothing to do with the Volt. The Volt will built on a modified version of a conventional platform called Delta. This platfrom will be shared with the new Chevy Cobalt. It is conventional unibody construction. The difference will be a modified floor pan to accomodate the T shaped battery pack.

Will the dealer supply a loaner? Will I have to pay to have it shipped to and back from Michigan?
I suspect that because of the importance of this program to GM, we will be treated as VIPs at the dealership. Loaners for longer repairs will be very probable. Nothing will be going back to Michigan.

How long will it take for dealerships to get the special lifts needed to disassemble the body?
What ever special equipment and training is required will be in place at select dealerships just prior to release. This is part of why it takes so long to release an all new car like this. All this stuff has to be figured out and put in place so that any servicing we need will be as seamless as possible.
 

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But the issue is the frame, how do make it rigid and safe with a big hole in the middle for the battery.
That's why they made the battery pack T shaped. The long shaft of the T goes where rear wheel drive cars have the drive shaft in the "Tunnel", only in the Volt's case, the tunnel will be much bigger than usual. The head of the T goes under the rear seat and takes the space where gas tanks are often placed. The battery pack is why we aren't getting a fifth seat. There will be no place for the fifth passenger to put their legs. The modification to the unibody floor pan (technically there is no frame) isn't that far from usual configurations, so I would expect no real structural issues with regards to rigidity and crash safety.
 

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That's why they made the battery pack T shaped. The long shaft of the T goes where rear wheel drive cars have the drive shaft in the "Tunnel", only in the Volt's case, the tunnel will be much bigger than usual. The head of the T goes under the rear seat and takes the space where gas tanks are often placed. The battery pack is why we aren't getting a fifth seat. There will be no place for the fifth passenger to put their legs. The modification to the unibody floor pan (technically there is no frame) isn't that far from usual configurations, so I would expect no real structural issues with regards to rigidity and crash safety.
Thanks, but again you should read what the engineer on the project said here, he doesn't feel that over confidend about it.

In late March, at the New York auto show, I checked back in with Andrew Farah, the Volt’s chief engineer, and asked for an update. “Still just as bad as before,” he said. When I mentioned that another executive had said the underbody was a well-proven design that didn’t need much testing, he shot me a look of disbelief. “There’s a big gaping hole down the center of this car where the battery goes.”
And he continues saying

“Maybe what we’re going to learn out of this isn’t some technological thing,” Farah said. “Maybe what we’re learning is to be more comfortable with a higher level of risk.” I asked if he did feel comfortable with the risks the program was taking. He thought for a moment. “I realize there’s no other way to do it, so I am comfortable with it.” Was he holding up under the pressure? He thought again. “It’s my job to hold up.”
 
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