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From the article -
GM plans to invest $3 billion in its Detroit-Hamtramck plant to build electric trucks and vans and battery modules, according to a letter it sent to the UAW this month as part of contract talks.
Dan Nicholson, GM's vice president for global electrification, said in February at a national ethanol conference that at one point he led an 8,000-person global organization that was entirely focused on internal combustion engines and "then we moved to about a 70% ICE, 30% electrification split. Now are we are flipping that from 70% ICE to just 30% ICE and focusing 70% on electrification."
Glad to see GM is staying in the game as they seemed to have slipped in the EV sector in the last couple years.
 

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Maybe they are currently taking a "break" from at least the domestic EV market while they are at a market disadvantage because of the tax credit issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Maybe they are currently taking a "break" from at least the domestic EV market while they are at a market disadvantage because of the tax credit issue.
You can bet there are some serious discussions going on about that at the highest level of the corporation.
 

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Being in "power-outage country," a.k.a. the third-world State of California, I will not be buying a pure BEV from anybody. Looks like my GM days are over. However, Honda is bringing out an EREV (the only way to go for me) with a rotary backup engine. Description sounds very nice. Fingers crossed that they bring it to CA. The reviews sound great, but the first rollout is in Europe.

Porsche Panamera 4E Hybrid looks great too, although short on electric range (about 30 miles at best) and lots of $$$.

To the automakers: Keep those EREVs coming!
 

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^ I think the rotary engine model you are referring to is the one from Mazda, not Honda. However, Honda does make a good EREV, the Clarity.

I am also a big believer in EREV. But if a BEV had a whole lot more range than I really needed on a typical day, then that could work also, being able to bridge some unexpected circumstances like power outages.
 

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Being in "power-outage country," a.k.a. the third-world State of California, I will not be buying a pure BEV from anybody. Looks like my GM days are over. However, Honda is bringing out an EREV (the only way to go for me) with a rotary backup engine. Description sounds very nice. Fingers crossed that they bring it to CA. The reviews sound great, but the first rollout is in Europe.

Porsche Panamera 4E Hybrid looks great too, although short on electric range (about 30 miles at best) and lots of $$$.

To the automakers: Keep those EREVs coming!
You can't fill your gas tank without electricity either. It takes electricity to run the gas pumps. With a BEV you can hedge your bets by installing home solar with sufficient capacity to cover both your home power needs and your car's power needs.

I agree - PHEVs are the way to go for at least another decade. The middle of the country won't have a good charging infrastructure for at least that long.
 

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PHEVs are a trade off with most manufacturers going the 20 mile route as a trade off between cost. weight of a battery vs. how much is actually used on a daily basis. Others take their hybrid, add a little more battery with a plug in charger and call it a PHEV. There are only a few that make an EREV where the battery is big enough for most where the engine is only use occasionally. A few are in between the 20 and 40/60 mile range like Pacifica that are in the 30 mile range. You pays your money and hope it's right.
 

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^ I think the rotary engine model you are referring to is the one from Mazda, not Honda. However, Honda does make a good EREV, the Clarity.

I am also a big believer in EREV. But if a BEV had a whole lot more range than I really needed on a typical day, then that could work also, being able to bridge some unexpected circumstances like power outages.
You are correct. I meant to type Mazda but inexplicably typed Honda. I do that a lot nowadays. Thanks. I don't go for the Clarity because if you hit the throttle aggressively the ICE comes on regardless of battery charge state. That to me falls short of a true EREV.
 

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You can't fill your gas tank without electricity either. It takes electricity to run the gas pumps. With a BEV you can hedge your bets by installing home solar with sufficient capacity to cover both your home power needs and your car's power needs.

I agree - PHEVs are the way to go for at least another decade. The middle of the country won't have a good charging infrastructure for at least that long.

A good point generally, but here in power-outage country (CA) you can drive a few miles from any of the deliberate outages and find the lights on. So filling up with gasoline is a short drive from an outage and an easy proposition. I love the dual-fuel nature of an EREV, especially when both fuels are very common (gasoline and electricity).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I agree - PHEVs are the way to go for at least another decade. The middle of the country won't have a good charging infrastructure for at least that long.
I'd bet that in 5 years there's a fast charging station on I-70 every 50 miles across the country.
 

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A good point generally, but here in power-outage country (CA) you can drive a few miles from any of the deliberate outages and find the lights on. So filling up with gasoline is a short drive from an outage and an easy proposition. I love the dual-fuel nature of an EREV, especially when both fuels are very common (gasoline and electricity).
And you couldn't drive a few miles to a live charging station -- particularly in CA where they are becoming ubiquitous???
 

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I'll be hanging onto my Volt for a long time. ;)
 

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I'd bet that in 5 years there's a fast charging station on I-70 every 50 miles across the country.
What about all the secondary roads and in the small towns across the country? The interstates will be covered, but they don't go everywhere.
 

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And you couldn't drive a few miles to a live charging station -- particularly in CA where they are becoming ubiquitous???
Nope. Takes too long to charge. I want a full tank in less than 5 minutes, and until they have that, no deal.
 

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What about all the secondary roads and in the small towns across the country? The interstates will be covered, but they don't go everywhere.

Agreed. Not in my lifetime will charging stations be as ubiquitous as gas stations. Not even close. Hence, no BEV for me -- it's EREV or bust.
 

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Here on the island every little town has an L2 charging station (and they are free). L3's are a little less common although our 5,000 population town has one at the library/sports complex. It will come sooner than you think. People talk about the 5 minute fill yet all the survey data shows that only 5% of the people need it. Things can be different in megalopolises like LA where you have to live 100 miles away from work to find affordable housing (part of the wild fire problem as they are building in wild fire prone areas of windy canyons and dry brush).
 

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Agreed. Not in my lifetime will charging stations be as ubiquitous as gas stations. Not even close. Hence, no BEV for me -- it's EREV or bust.
OK.

I certainly like having my 2011 Volt for it's dual-fuel nature. But having a Bolt as well for the past 2 years I'm starting to think that when the day comes to replace my Volt, I will likely go BEV, whether another Bolt or something else. At this point, saying goodbye to an ICE would not be hard for me based on my Bolt experience. Many small towns actually do have charging opportunities. They may not be DCFC, they may not be as plentiful as gas stations, but they are there and growing.

I think it just depends on where you drive.

Some like long car trips, I fly. For the rare trip where I might not feel comfortable with the charging opportunities, I can rent a car. For me that would be infrequent and save wear and tear on my car.
 
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