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GM should be advertising real world MPG

The real world MPGs are so far above the sticker .. GM should be taking advantage of it.

The VOLT is getting MPGs no other car before it has ever gotten... at LEAST twice that of the Prius.

Every Mfr is in a scramble to catch up with the VOLTEC.
 

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They've got to keep it real, otherwise people like me (my current lifetime MPG is 49.2 with over 6300 miles) would really kibble up the works! Mine'll go up slowly (it was 42.5 a few weeks ago) now that I'm using the car more normally (I haven't burned any gas in 2 weeks of 30-60 miles a day driving).

But they still have to keep it real...
 

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IMHO, MPG is a stupid stat to attribute to the VOLT except for the generator-only mode (37 mpg). Otherwise, what is this "gallon" you are referring to? Lots of people don't understand this car as it is, and muddling the scene with MPGe, or whatever else you invent just makes them more confused. Just lay it to them straight: You get ~25-50 miles per charge with NO GAS, then beyond that you get 37 mpg.

The last thing you want is some idiot expecting to get 98 mpg without ever charging and throwing a fit. I'd rather that person misunderstand the car in the other direction ("just a 37mpg car"). If they don't get it, they're not going to buy it anyway.
 

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IMHO, MPG is a stupid stat to attribute to the VOLT except for the generator-only mode (37 mpg). Otherwise, what is this "gallon" you are referring to? Lots of people don't understand this car as it is, and muddling the scene with MPGe, or whatever else you invent just makes them more confused. Just lay it to them straight: You get ~25-50 miles per charge with NO GAS, then beyond that you get 37 mpg.

The last thing you want is some idiot expecting to get 98 mpg without ever charging and throwing a fit. I'd rather that person misunderstand the car in the other direction ("just a 37mpg car"). If they don't get it, they're not going to buy it anyway.
I understand what you are saying but would disagree. MPG is what we all grew up with and is what people understand. I'm one of those people that will be able to charge at work and I fully expect to get over 200 MPG at the very least. To be sure, to say that I'm getting over 200 MPG will be technically true but somewhat misleading because it doesn't capture the energy used from charging it. However, the 200 MPG figure captures people's interest and we can then go into the details of how the car works and what they may expect based on their driving pattern.

Then you offer them the test drive and they are sold. Especially in this era of rising gas prices.
 

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I agree with Zod. It is time to re-educate modern car owners as how to compare an EV with a conventional gasoline ICE powered vehicle. You can announce your equivalent MPG, but a true EV can reach much higher values according to the driven conditions, as for regular ICE vehicles. I believe that by the end of this year as newer EV and hybrids arrive, the true mileage value will be by its cost, not by gallons of fuel, and it should be always that way. Many will say that fuel prices are rising, so that the cost per mile will increase for an ICE vehicle, even if its MPG is high. That is what EV promoters must show that their vehicles are cheaper and safer if fuel prices increase.

If everyone understands the cost of their electricity supply (whether it is supplied by a utility or home produced), then they can apply that cost to all of their appliances and their EV. Remember the horsepower value? We still use it, although it is over two hundred years old!! Same goes for MPG. It is outdated!

We must show the cost per mile of travel for any vehicle according to its source of power (gasoline, electricity, or real horses!) and use that to compare and promote the EV over the ICE vehicles. The EPA report has it on the Volt sticker.

MPG isn't valid anymore!!

Raymond
 

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>>> MPG is what we all grew up with and is what people understand.

Well, I say people should suck it up and use the brain they have been graced with and learn something new. How do we evolve if we don't do this? Kids these days are smarter than we were as kids and they can grow up with something new.

The way to talk Volt will be "Cost per mile" rather than miles per gallon. But both gallon price and kWh price vary from area to area and would confuse people on the showroom floor. I do get "floored" as to why - why can't people deal with simple math? They can easily write a check for $100+ a month for cable tv or $300 a month for home heating - maybe they just don't care?

I'd love to see Volt have an input entry for fuel cost - when you refill, it can ask you "what was the per-gallon price just now?" and you can input your kWh cost and maybe the monthly reports OnStar gives could include some form of cost per mile in each mode.
 

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Testimonials are always good. Didn't Toyota recently run a campaign based on testimonials about its reliability of the Camry?

As for cost per mile, that should show up in the residual, which, BTW, is why the US Bank lease isn't such a great deal. IOW if the per mile cost of an EV is much lower, then the residual should be much higher. This follows because while the sheet metal may depreciate the "discount to gas" card works as well in year four as it does in year one. Some, like smarter people and businesses with fleets, will figure this out sooner rather than later. If gas spikes to $4 or $5 per gallon, which I don't think will happen but it's possible, everyone will figure this out.
 

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I do hear you, bonaire, but I will quote Rumsfield on this one: You go to to war with the army you have, not the one you wish you had.

IOW, the intellect of the average American is, well, average and the level of ignorance surrounding EVs and EREVs is rather high. So I may wish for them to pick up on MPGe or Cost per Mile, etc. but the fact is I go into the conversation about the Volt not with my desired audience but with the audience I have. In that sense I need to speak "their" language before I can get them to understand the energy consumption of the Volt.

I wish we were living in a world more like what you and Raymond are describing but we live in a world where the metric system still isn't adopted in the US because we apparently can't handle it, with it being so bedeviling complicated and all.
 

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GM should be advertising real world MPG

The real world MPGs are so far above the sticker .. GM should be taking advantage of it.
GM can't take advantage of consumers or anyone else when reporting mileages. All manufacturers are required to report mileage based on laboratory testing, using a test protocol established by a US agency, the US EPA. This rule protects consumers from manipulation and fraud. Otherwise folks could advertise any number they felt like, or manufacturers could advertise lies like we saw from blogs a few years ago, which said the Hummer is more environmentally friendly than the Prius.

So, we can debate if the lab testing accurately reflects the real world, but, to protect everyone involved, all cars have to be measured with the same methodology. To carry an analogy a little further, we could call the lab tests a yardstick. While the yardstick may only be 2 feet long, everyone gets measured by the same yardstick.

WVhybrid
status = 4B00
 

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I suppose GM could release worst, best, average, and mode MPG across the entire fleet of Volts after collecting data for a reasonable amount of time (6-9-12 months). They certainly wouldn't want to do it right now, 'cause all you chilly folk are making it look bad for the rest of us (said the man who's lifetime MPG just crossed to the right side of 50 :).

The Volt has a advantage in this regard, ET phones home and lets GM know what its customers are actually getting.
 

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In one pure-gasoline test--it was a 70 mile round trip, stopping for brunch with friends, and the return was with a depleted battery--I showed 41 mpg. The drive was almost all freeway. I didn't do anything unusual to try to increase my energy economy, though I don't tend to gratuitously accelerate or decelerate rapidly, regardless of the car I'm driving.

- Alan
Volt 1238
 

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I am a Volt owner and I totally disagree with the point of this thread.

GM is already providing misleading gas mileage by counting total miles driven divided by gasoline used to provide an "energy efficiency" that totally ignores electricity used. This is very misleading and really hurts my confidence in the true efficiency of their new product.
 

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I am a Volt owner and I totally disagree with the point of this thread.

GM is already providing misleading gas mileage by counting total miles driven divided by gasoline used to provide an "energy efficiency" that totally ignores electricity used. This is very misleading and really hurts my confidence in the true efficiency of their new product.
I agree with you in principal. That said, others on this forum have explained (far more eloquently than me) that the Volt's MPG number is correct in a literal sense: miles driven divided by gallons consumed.

The value of electrons varies dramatically from user to user. For some, like long-time solar users, it's almost free. For others, the cost of electricity is a fraction of the cost of gasoline. For me personally, I am so bothered by our outrageous oil addiction, that I have no problem ignoring the $0.50 per day that I may spend on additional electricity.

What I know and love is that my Volt's MPG (in the literal sense) is unbelievably low.
 

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I think all posters on this thread have missed the fact that its not GM that gets to decide what to put onthe sticker, right? Its the EPA or some group that sets up the standards of how MPG performance is reported. In fact, when I was trying to learn about the Volt back in mid-2010, I believe I read several reports that said GM and the EPA were "negotiating" or trying to come up with some equitable way to state performance for a car like the Volt. So, the title of the thread does not make sense. And they probably can't (for legal reasons) "advertise" something that they are not allowed to put on the sticker.

I like to think in terms of "cost-equivalent mpg" --- if your electricity costs you about $0.12 per kwh, and it takes 12 khw to charge the Volt, then the cost to charge is $1.44. If gas costs you $4.20/gallon, then what you spent on electricity would have bought you 1.44/4.20 = 0.342 gallons. Since you went 40 miles on this 'cost-equivalent' 0.342 gallons, it means you got 40/0.342 = 116.6 mpg in a cost-equivlent sense. Finally, your overall MPG is a weighted average between this 116.6 and 37 depending what percentage of your driving is on electric with ICE off.
 

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GM is required to note the official EPA mileage numbers, but that does not keep it from using, as suggested earlier, testimonials from real Volt drivers. We migrated from a 2006 Prius and 2007 Camry Hybrid to both the Volt and the Leaf. We use our Volt for some daily commuting and for all of our longer trips to the Bay area from Sacramento and for any "road trip" weekends we might indulge. With this pattern of use in our Volt, we are getting just under 100 mpg for the first 3000 miles of cumulative use. Compare that to our earlier Prius...where we kept thorough records of every fill-up and achieved just under 50 mpg for 64,000 miles. Sure 50 mpg is wonderful, but 100 mpg is "more wonderful."

And what other driving technology can you power from/at your own home? We have a 5.5 kWh solar panel system, and that wipes out totally our annual home electricity bill AND it provides enough peak time credit to cover all our midnight to 7 am car charging costs too !!!

Go solar and go really green !!!
 

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GM is required to note the official EPA mileage numbers, but that does not keep it from using, as suggested earlier, testimonials from real Volt drivers. We migrated from a 2006 Prius and 2007 Camry Hybrid to both the Volt and the Leaf. We use our Volt for some daily commuting and for all of our longer trips to the Bay area from Sacramento and for any "road trip" weekends we might indulge. With this pattern of use in our Volt, we are getting just under 100 mpg for the first 3000 miles of cumulative use. Compare that to our earlier Prius...where we kept thorough records of every fill-up and achieved just under 50 mpg for 64,000 miles. Sure 50 mpg is wonderful, but 100 mpg is "more wonderful."

And what other driving technology can you power from/at your own home? We have a 5.5 kWh solar panel system, and that wipes out totally our annual home electricity bill AND it provides enough peak time credit to cover all our midnight to 7 am car charging costs too !!!

Go solar and go really green !!!
ME too, picking my VOLT up in about 10days. Me likes driving for free. and just gets me more ROI out of my panels when the gas costs are nearly $4.
 

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How about:

Achieve more than one thousand miles between gas fill-up by plugging in!

or

Current Volt Owners achieved thousands of miles between gas fill-ups!
 
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