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Sounds like an MSRP somewhere around $32,000.00

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-11-27/gm-says-chevy-spark-to-start-at-less-than-25-000
General Motors Co....plans to begin selling an all-electric version of the Chevrolet Spark initially in California and Oregon in 2013’s third quarter

The electric model will start at less than $25,000 after a $7,500 U.S. tax credit, the company said today in an e-mailed statement. Michael Albano, a GM spokesman, declined to provide an exact price.
 

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If that is true, it's disappointing. Considering the larger iMiev (98 vs 86 cf interior) starts at $29,000, Chevy will be lucky to get a few hundred sales per month. In addition, the Smart EV (though smaller) will be priced at $25,000 before tax credit. I was hoping the Spark EV would come in around $27,000 to make it a "less than $20k EV".
 

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If that is true, it's disappointing. Considering the larger iMiev (98 vs 86 cf interior) starts at $29,000, Chevy will be lucky to get a few hundred sales per month. In addition, the Smart EV (though smaller) will be priced at $25,000 before tax credit. I was hoping the Spark EV would come in around $27,000 to make it a "less than $20k EV".
The Spark will be a bit less efficient, but it has more welly and a larger (20 v 16) and more capable battery so will hopefully have more range. It would be nice to see 70 miles. Also the i(MiEV) is noted for lack of performance and I think that holds back sales. Finally, "starts at" can be significant enough in terms of amenities that you realistically have a minimum that costs more.

But, I was hoping to see $29,999.99. I think that with good performance that would be an attention grabber.
 

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Adios Spark.

Sadly, it appears DonC was correct: a CARB compliance vehicle.

GM definitely is overpricing the Spark.

Very disappointed. Probably will not buy.
Seriously, GM, you can sell a gas Spark for $12 grand but you have to sell the electric Spark for $32 grand? Don't tell me you (GM) aren't price gouging. Even if somebody here works for GM, sorry, I don't believe for a second that such a price actually represents the cost of (even) a 100 mile electric drivetrain.

Time for Tesla to reveal their sub-30K EV. GM clearly has its old gas-stock holding cronies showing strongly.
 

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I don't know if I share the same negative criticism. The Nissan Leaf is over 3k more expensive, with no thermal management for the battery, and about the same range. The Spark, with a 400 lb/ft torque motor will out perform any other sub 40k commodity production electric vehicle, and the car will likely hold a better appointed interior and more features than the iMiev.

I don't expect the Spark to fly off the shelves, but I expect it to pull a good number of sales from the Leaf.
 

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I am with CarZin on this one. By pricing the Spark at $32,490 or less, the net price is less than $25k, which is pretty sweet for a car with 60 or 65 miles of EPA AER. This may start as a CA only compliance car, but it could end up getting decent sales/lease figures.
And I bet it will be a ton of fun to drive! Plus every electric car that GM builds brings down the cost a bit for the rest of the electric line up.
 

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I don't know if I share the same negative criticism. <snip>

I don't expect the Spark to fly off the shelves, but I expect it to pull a good number of sales from the Leaf.
Pull sales from the Leaf? That's like saying the "highest F" in the class. So now Leaf will sell 150 units and Spark 165, monthly? LOL.

Sadly, I see a $32K pre-tax credit Spark as a FAIL.
 

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Are GM and other manufacturers gaming the government incentives? I'm starting to think so. Otherwise, please explain to me how/why the EV drivetrain should add $18K to the price of a well-equipped Spark??

GM had a shot here to do something great, and instead they've shoved their EV into a narrow corner, with CA-only availability, a way-too-high price, and no 6.6KW charging capability. I'm fairly disappointed.
 

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Are GM and other manufacturers gaming the government incentives? I'm starting to think so. Otherwise, please explain to me how/why the EV drivetrain should add $18K to the price of a well-equipped Spark??

GM had a shot here to do something great, and instead they've shoved their EV into a narrow corner, with CA-only availability, a way-too-high price, and no 6.6KW charging capability. I'm fairly disappointed.
Because they think the market will bear the price.... I happen to think they are right. NO electric car, not even in california, will fly off the shelves; there's just not enough mainstream demand. This car is prcied competitively to the segment that is looking at these vehicles (cars that are HOV eligible, and secondarily electric enthusiasts).
 

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Are GM and other manufacturers gaming the government incentives? I'm starting to think so. Otherwise, please explain to me how/why the EV drivetrain should add $18K to the price of a well-equipped Spark??

GM had a shot here to do something great, and instead they've shoved their EV into a narrow corner, with CA-only availability, a way-too-high price, and no 6.6KW charging capability. I'm fairly disappointed.
$18K * 20K = $160M

That is, if they expect to sell 20,000 of them the total cost difference including all R&D, parts, testing, sales, recalls and opportunity cost (e.g. if a buyer chooses a Spark EV they didn't buy a Cruze) can only be $160M, which is, relatively speaking, a tiny amount.

The reason cars are "cheap" is manufacturing in volume. A compliance car happens when it's more profitable to dump a car into the market at the minimum required volume than to attempt to sell at higher volume. The manufacturer will set the price accordingly.
 

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I can't get the $7,500 tax credit for any EV because I don't pay Federal taxes. GM must sell the Spark EV for less than $30,000 before the credit, or else the other brand will sell better. The only way out is for the next Obama administration to approve a rebate that any U.S. citizen can use, including someone like myself who live in a territory that doesn't pay Federal taxes.
 

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I don't believe BEV's are going to sell well in the US. Perhaps in Europe or Asia where you have higher gas prices and dense urban environments EV's will do better.

The USA is just not ready to give up the love affair with V8's and gasoline. (yet).
 

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That's circular reasoning; a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Because they think the market will bear the price.... I happen to think they are right. NO electric car, not even in california, will fly off the shelves; there's just not enough mainstream demand. This car is prcied competitively to the segment that is looking at these vehicles (cars that are HOV eligible, and secondarily electric enthusiasts).
Perfect demonstration of circular thinking. First, you assume that EVs are not a realistic option. Thus, they are a niche product that can be overpriced, i.e. "the market will bear the price." And lo, EVs are not a a realistic option.

SO you believe EVs are silly and only those who really desperately want EVs will buy them. Therefore, you can elevate the price above mainstream accessibility, and sure enough, nobody really wants to buy them.

But IF you believe EVs are a realistic option, AND you price them according to actual worth, LO and behold, EVs will suddenly be VERY popular.

EVs ARE a realistic option.
 

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I was interested in this car. Now I'm not. I'd buy a used Volt or simply keep my second car longer.
 

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I think the A123 system pack adds a lot to the price - they are known for high-priced parts. If the use of A123 EXT cells could take away the cost of the TMS in the packs (as they said it could next year) then using them seems to make sense. One reason to use A123 over LG Chem is to not have to factor-in nearly as much of the state of charge logic to limit the SOC range used as Volt does. Plus, the USA-side build of the electric motor and battery, then shipping the motor and battery to Korea, then shipping the car back to the USA adds cost.
 

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Are GM and other manufacturers gaming the government incentives? I'm starting to think so. Otherwise, please explain to me how/why the EV drivetrain should add $18K to the price of a well-equipped Spark??

GM had a shot here to do something great, and instead they've shoved their EV into a narrow corner, with CA-only availability, a way-too-high price, and no 6.6KW charging capability. I'm fairly disappointed.
The Spark EV also has more features than a fully loaded Spark 2LT (Which is priced at nearly $18K BTW).

I figure the EV powtrain is adding about $13K to the price tag plus another $1K - $2K for the additional features (LCD screens, heated seats, custom body pannels and extra parts etc..)

I do agree that $32K is going to be a bit steep for the market to swallow. I too was hoping for a sub $30K price tag. This car will likely be ~$35K CAD in Canada. Hopefully these will have some decent lease options. With a pure BEV a lease can make a lot of sense for a lot of people.
 
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Wooah! Time For A reality Check- It Is All In The Net Cost To Drive!

Greetings all,

Thanks for the Breaking Spark EV News- James!

I sell and lease The Amazing Chevy Volt Extended Range Electric Vehicle.

I leased my 2012 Volt back in March of 2012. Now have over 10,000 miles on it and 3 origional gallons of gas left in the gas tank. Loving it.

VoltStats.Net # 25

So the Amazing Chevy Spark PEV will have a MSRP of less then $25,000.00 after Fed $7,500.00 figured in.

I hear many of you standing back on this news, however, I may be able to shed some light on the marketing and P/L strategy being employed here.


Lets take a look at the current sales push on the MY2013 Chevy Volt.

The Official Chevrolet Volt home page says this: Lease the Volt, with a MSRP of $39,995.00 at $329.00 with $2,999.00 due at signing, 12,000 miles a year allowed!

http://www.chevrolet.com/volt-electric-car.html

Folks, this is a $40,000 car!

Using the $7,500.00 Fed Credit NOW plus the $2,420.00 Cap Cost Reduction ( Lease Rebate ) we arive at a monthly payment, $329.00, normally associated with a $16,500.00 4 year old used car, such as a 2009, 55,000 Average mile, Malibu LTZ!

Naturally the 2009 Malibu LTZ at 20 MPG combined average per EPA

( http://fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=25485 )

-driving 40 lease allowed miles a day, would use almost 2 gallons of gas a day at $7.00 or so. $7.00 X 30 Days/Month = $210.00. This amount of additional expence can be avoided with the Volt and absolutely gone with the MY2014 Chevy Spark EV!

Regardless of official MSRP next summer, I predict that the MY2014 Chevy Spark MUST Lease for less then the Chevy Volt!

Taking this into consideration, I look to see the Spark EV -Ally/US Bank Lease to position itself around $249.00 a month. That is $90.00 a month or $23.50 a week less then the base Volt lease.

While the Spark Ev has a greater High Voltage Battery Capacity the 12,000 mile lease equals 40 miles or so a day allowed. At .09 cents a kWH average this could result a plug in cost of about a buck a day.

So, take the electric cost of $30.00 a month away from the $210.00 savings in gasoline and you end up with a savings if $180.00 each and every month of the MY2014 Chevy Spark EV 3yr/ 12,000 a year lease.

Finally taking my predicted $249.00 lease payment, subtract the $180.00 in normal gas expence, after electricity cost and you would end up with a NET COST TO DRIVE while leasing of $59.00 a month!

Finally taking my predicted $249.00 lease payment, subtract the $180.00 in normal gas expence, after electricity cost and you would end up with a NET COST TO DRIVE, while leasing of $59.00 a month!

Does this make sence? You bet it does!

4 years ago on this forum as a non member I predicted a $250.00 a month lease payment on the My2011 Chevy Volt. There was much reaction and unbelief yet that payment was realized this past August. Let's embrace and welcome the next step towards reducing our dependence on forign oil and celebrate our newest edition to the Chevrolet family!


PS... My Volt Stats- 3yr/45,000 mile lease- Bout a buck a day electric- plug in home/work- Net .50 cents a day- 1,250 miles a month driving for $15.00 dollars a month!


Best-

Thomas J. Thias

Sundance Chevrolet
 

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I don't believe BEV's are going to sell well in the US. Perhaps in Europe or Asia where you have higher gas prices and dense urban environments EV's will do better.

The USA is just not ready to give up the love affair with V8's and gasoline. (yet).
I think they can sell. The USA has several important things:
a) Money (and the willingness to spend it to get a better car)
b) Climate (higher average temperatures are better than lower for BEV)
c) Higher average cars per household (it's easier to have a BEV+other than a single BEV)
d) Newer, sprawling cities (old high density cities have more apartment dwellers with less access to charging; greater sprawl means longer average commutes, which gives more favorable plug-in economics)
e) Preference for hybrid over diesel (familiarity with electrification; better BEV economics)
f) Money (see (a))

While I see PHEV growing more rapidly, due to economics and utility, cheap batteries could cause that swiftly to be followed by households going PHEV+BEV, especially if Tesla succeeds with the Model S and X and has the finances to work on a lower-cost platform.
 

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A bit disappointing, but not too bad. I will wait for the real world range and hands on reviews.
However, at first glance I have to say it is looking like my Volt may be replaced with a non GM product. I would like to see GM take a leadership position in pure EVs as they have with serial hybrids. I really think they should take a page from the Tesla handbook and get away from the more expensive A123 batteries and focus more on a good battery management system using less expensive mature battery technology.
The battery management system they have now is fantastic, so I don't think it would be too much more difficult with a more mature battery.
 
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