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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GM offers up to $500,000 to Cadillac dealers who want to opt out of the EV revolution. For those dealers who feel the EV journey is not suitable for them, who doubt the business case, or who doesn't want to gear up with the infrastructure to charge or service electric cars.


I think they made a similar offer to dealers during the transition from horse and buggy to horseless carriage, lol
 

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Why do this? GM could simply not provide them with EVs and as GM's fleet shifts those dealerships will be left out and fail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Apparently GM want to reduce the number of old, behind the time dealers. Carrot and stick?
 
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I think they made a similar offer to dealers during the transition from horse and buggy to horseless carriage, lol
Actually they tried to buy out some low volume Caddy dealers a few years ago offering much less. There were few takers. They are trying to get the smaller marginal dealers out of the way. I was just thinking that it may have to do with less service needed, only the larger ones would survive the new world order. With the Chinese starting their auto exports like Hyundai did in the 80's and Japan did in the 60's there is going to be belt tightening or lose market share.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In the early days, there was a Chevy dealer in PA that fired a salesman for selling a Volt. Oh well.
 

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Meanwhile, I can’t wait for the Lyriq to arrive
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ha, today I see that the PA car dealer I mentioned above who fired a salesman for selling a Volt is now a politician. He tried to get a bill passed in congress that would allow car dealers to rent or loan cars with unfixed safety defects under active recall. He's now trying to throw out the PA popular vote and replace it with a mandate from the PA legislature. If successful, his lawsuit would invalidate his own election. Sounds like a peach of a guy.

And... he owns a Caddy dealership too. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update, 150 (one in six) of the 880 Cadillac dealers in the USA opted to close instead of selling electric Cadillacs.

When told to get with the times or get out of the way, 150 out of 800 dealers reportedly took the cash buyout and walked away. They did not want to invest $200,000 in charging stations, training of employees and lifts that can carry the heavy batteries powering the vehicles to support the brand's electric future.

On the other hand, GM has wanted to reduce the dealer numbers for many years. For comparison, BMW had just 341 sales locations nationwide as of 2018 while Mercedes-Benz had just 363 in 2019.


“For small dealers who are selling under 75, under 50 cars a year, it won’t make sense to them,” said Inder Dosanjh, dealer principal at the California Automotive Retailing Group that owns four Cadillac retailers. “It’s not anything that other manufacturers aren’t requiring. They did the same thing. Volkswagen, Infiniti, they all are requiring the same. It’s nothing crazy. You have to change."

General Motors has set aside $27 billion in investments for new all-electric vehicle technology and autonomous vehicle technology through 2025. The automaker plans to allocate more than half of its capital spending and product development team towards EV and AV programs.
 

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Update, 150 (one in six) of the 880 Cadillac dealers in the USA opted to close instead of selling electric Cadillacs.

When told to get with the times or get out of the way, 150 out of 800 dealers reportedly took the cash buyout and walked away. They did not want to invest $200,000 in charging infrastructure and other updates to their facilities and training to support the brand's electric future.

On the other hand, GM has wanted to reduce the dealer numbers for many years. For comparison, BMW had just 341 sales locations nationwide as of 2018 while Mercedes-Benz had just 363 in 2019.


Oh well. I guess they figure EV's (like the internet) are just a fad...
I wonder what type/speed of charging they will setup for Ultium batteries? Also will it be free or will the charge per kWH? It would be awesome if GM vehicles were free and others would be charged a fee. That would require some extra circuitry or signal to determine what kind of vehicle is plugged in, and probably hard to identify a volt, bolt, elr, or ct6 plugin from any other EV
 

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I wonder what type/speed of charging they will setup for Ultium batteries? Also will it be free or will the charge per kWH? It would be awesome if GM vehicles were free and others would be charged a fee. That would require some extra circuitry or signal to determine what kind of vehicle is plugged in, and probably hard to identify a volt, bolt, elr, or ct6 plugin from any other EV
The "charging infrastructure" would be so they can charge their and customer's cars when they are in for service. They would of course use the standard interface (not Tesla's), speed goes up with new technology but regardless how fast it is, it can't charge faster than the older charge stations can output. Regardless here are some truths about charging speed:

When you grab a bite to eat on the road it still takes the same amount of time to order a McDonald's Big Mac and eat it (fries and Coke of course) regardless how fast the charging speed is. If you are one of those that will only eat in a Diner, then, forget about it, charging speed is irrelevant.

The older you get the more often you have to go pee regardless how big the battery is or how long the range, you will need a bio break before your car needs to be charged.

If you are driving long distances it is important to take breaks to refresh the mind and exercise your muscles. It could save your life and/or some one else's. Just ask the truck driver that didn't, blew through a stop sign and plowed into a bus of young hockey players, killing 18 and injuring the rest (some that are now wheelchair bound). After he gets out of jail he is being deported to India.
 

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The "charging infrastructure" would be so they can charge their and customer's cars when they are in for service. They would of course use the standard interface (not Tesla's), speed goes up with new technology but regardless how fast it is, it can't charge faster than the older charge stations can output. Regardless here are some truths about charging speed:

When you grab a bite to eat on the road it still takes the same amount of time to order a McDonald's Big Mac and eat it (fries and Coke of course) regardless how fast the charging speed is. If you are one of those that will only eat in a Diner, then, forget about it, charging speed is irrelevant.

The older you get the more often you have to go pee regardless how big the battery is or how long the range, you will need a bio break before your car needs to be charged.

If you are driving long distances it is important to take breaks to refresh the mind and exercise your muscles. It could save your life and/or some one else's. Just ask the truck driver that didn't, blew through a stop sign and plowed into a bus of young hockey players, killing 18 and injuring the rest (some that are now wheelchair bound). After he gets out of jail he is being deported to India.
Still, charging speed does matter. If plugging a LYRIQ into a caddy charging station takes 4-12 hours to fill up, then it’s useless. 10 min is better than 30 min or an hour. If cadlllac doesn’t use its dealer network to build a charging infrastructure like Tesla’s supercharger network, then they will have a tough time becoming an EV leader. Even Nissan has chargers at all of their dealerships, albeit not super fast ones.
 

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The lack of charging faculties will haunt the adoption of non-Tesla EVs. I can see battles breaking out at GM dealers over charging stations. Charge Rage erupts when proper etiquette and decorum is not followed at scarce charging stations. I was blocked out at GM dealer one time where a Tesla was plugged in to a L2 I often used. I just went on my way, thinking he must be near empty, and knowing my Volt would allow me to go anywhere at anytime. What happens when someone (GM or other) hogs a spot? As the EV revolution continues, we must build out a sensible charging infrastructure.
 

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I think persons well heeled enough to buy luxury EVs might consider their time valuable. As in I have better uses of my time than sitting at a charger for 30 minutes.
I just drove Silverado crew cab with the 3.0 diesel. Saw some eye popping mileage numbers and I'm thinking of bagging the Cybertruck order. I don't need bulletproof and I don't intend on street racing. Lease up and there are EV pickups at reasonable prices, sure. But waiting years for something that might be better, hmmm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Cadillac charging infrastructure requirements are no different than that required of Chevy dealers. When I picked up my Bolt after its last service, it was plugged into a DC fast charger in the dealers service area. If you think that Cadillac dealers will become public charging stations, you will be disappointed. They also aren't public gas stations.

Regarding GM building a network, it's working with EVgo to create a constellation of 2,700 electric vehicle fast-charging stations in cities around the country. GM won't own or operate the stations. It won't subsidize the electrons they deliver, or receive any of the charging revenue. GM's customers won't have special access to them, and their vehicles won't fuel any better or worse than a Nissan or a Ford. It's simply encouraging EVgo to build more stations by giving it money.

Meanwhile, California is requiring EV charge stations with new construction so there will be more charge stations to address an EV buyer's chicken vs. egg conundrum. A number of people on this forum are unhappy with this approach as well.

But in sum, if you want to be a Cadillac dealer, now you need a way to charge EV's you are servicing. You also need a special rolling dolly to lower and raise batteries, and you need training for technicians. All things that Chevy dealers were confronted with 10 years ago. Some did (certified Volt, Bolt dealers), some did not. But Cadillac is exiting the gas era and aiming to be EV only, hence, you will either be an EV dealer or you will close your Cadillac dealership (in exchange for an exit bonus/severance payment).
 

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Oh Jmaj, please don't buy that oil burner. To get a gallon of diesel, the crude oil distillation process will produce 20 gallons of gasoline. A hundred years ago, gasoline was flared off as waste just to get the diesel fuel and other heavier distillates. That is what Henry Ford saw, and built his Model T to burn off that waste. The greater demand for diesel increases the amount of gas that has to burned too. These smaller diesel engines coming to market now were in development before DieselGate. Here in Canada, diesel prices are now 20% higher than gas to meet stiffer sulfur regs. It was 20% cheaper 5+ years ago. EV's are a step forward in terms of emissions reduction and cleaner air, ICE cars are a step backward, hybrids are a step sideways, and diesel is falling over backwards.
 
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