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Hi all

I'm sure this topic is covered somewhere to some extent. I tried to find it without success.

I am interested in some global figures - what is the share between full electric mode and range-extender mode?

The purpose of this question is to figure out if people who are buying a REX instead of a full EV out of range anxiety, later figure out that they actually have enough EV range and thus only rarely use the REX. This is of course overly simplified and generalised - but it could give some insight in EV adaptation amongst EV newcomers (probably the majority of Volt owners).

I guess that GM is aware of those stats and that they have shared this information publicly. If they did, a hint to those stats would be very much appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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The purpose of this question is to figure out if people who are buying a REX instead of a full EV out of range anxiety, later figure out that they actually have enough EV range and thus only rarely use the REX.
Speaking for two people here, a full BEV was never a consideration. "Range anxiety" per se requires limited range that an EREV eliminates as we can hit any gas station and continue on our way for any distance. Put another way, our Volt has never elicited any type of anxiety.

Yes we have found that we needed the REX on several occasions. In winter even more so as the range drops.

Now that some BEVs have longer range I expect the issue is less common, but I have reservations on whether we can say it's been eliminated. A Tesla owner might feel differently as they have supercharger capability.
 

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Hi all

I'm sure this topic is covered somewhere to some extent. I tried to find it without success.

I am interested in some global figures - what is the share between full electric mode and range-extender mode?

The purpose of this question is to figure out if people who are buying a REX instead of a full EV out of range anxiety, later figure out that they actually have enough EV range and thus only rarely use the REX. This is of course overly simplified and generalised - but it could give some insight in EV adaptation amongst EV newcomers (probably the majority of Volt owners).

I guess that GM is aware of those stats and that they have shared this information publicly. If they did, a hint to those stats would be very much appreciated.

Thanks!
Like above, check Voltstats.net. It is NOT user supplied data, it's direct telemetry from the OnStar system in the cars. You cannot fake the numbers like so many surveys and websites do.

Volts came with 35, 38, and 53 miles of EPA Combined AER depending on the year of production. The 2011-2015 are the 35 & 38, and the 2016 and 2017 are the 53. It is not unusual to exceed the advertised electric-only range.

Americans drive more miles on the average than Europeans, which is something to keep in mind when doing calculations.

Right now, the median EV% is 75.2% electric miles for the 111 million miles of data, which is probably going to climb over time as more 53 mile cars enter the fleet and older cars are retired.
 

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Speaking for two people here, a full BEV was never a consideration. "Range anxiety" per se requires limited range that an EREV eliminates as we can hit any gas station and continue on our way for any distance. Put another way, our Volt has never elicited any type of anxiety.

Yes we have found that we needed the REX on several occasions. In winter even more so as the range drops.

Now that some BEVs have longer range I expect the issue is less common, but I have reservations on whether we can say it's been eliminated. A Tesla owner might feel differently as they have supercharger capability.
This is what ruled out a BEV for me. The Volt provides me with an EV for my daily driving and an ICE/hybrid for long distance multi-day drives without having extended stops for recharging, assuming there are charging points where I'm going.
 

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This is what ruled out a BEV for me. The Volt provides me with an EV for my daily driving and an ICE/hybrid for long distance multi-day drives without having extended stops for recharging, assuming there are charging points where I'm going.
LOL, I'm a much simpler man. I like not having to give it a second thought. That said there are trips I know I won't make on battery, so when I get on the tollway I hit hold mode (REX for the OP if that isn't clear).
 

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I think we are at least 5 years away from the point where a BEV can be your only car unless you are willing to spend $100K. I'm atypical in that I do long, 250-385 mile, day trips every weekend in good weather but most people take that length trip occasionally. Zero range anxiety requires a BEV with the same range as an ICE car, 450 miles. At 450 even the longest day trip doesn't require a supercharger so the sparsity of superchargers wouldn't be an issue. A 450 mile BEV doesn't exist at any price right now so the next step down is a car with 300 miles of range and a charging network that has enough coverage so that you can do a long trip if you are willing to do some planning. Tesla is almost there. I check Tesla's map periodically to see if I could do all of my usual trips around New England. The superchargers in Vermont are well placed so Vermont is doable as of today. Maine isn't doable yet but it will be soon, at present they only have a couple of superchargers in the state and they are in the wrong places if you want to travel along the seacoast however they have a supercharger planned for Freeport which would make much of the seacoast doable in a 300 mile car. They also have superchargers planned for the White Mountains so when those are in place New Hampshire is doable. However there is a big but, Model 3 pricing just came out and as expected a usable Model 3 is no where near $35K. The 300 mile option is $9K, the anticollision and self parking features, which the Volt has, cost $5K, so you are looking at a minimum of $50K for a Model 3 that can go far enough to handle a road trip, and BTW you can't get one before 2019. If you want something sooner then you will have to buy a Model S which has a base price of $75K and in the long range versions will cost you north of $100K. Aside from the Tesla there are no BEVs that could be used as a road trip car today. Chevy clearly designed the Bolt to be a second car, it's range is more than sufficient for local trips but it's fast charger is much slower than Tesla's which doesn't really matter because there is hardly any CCS network to plug it into. Which leaves the Volt as the only EV that's practical as an only car. It has almost enough EV range to do most of your local driving on battery and for long trips it gets about 46 MPG on it's ICE (I've gotten as much as 53MPG) which gives it a range of 460 miles. I've never had to stop at a gas station on any of my day trips because the Volt usually only consumes 3.5 gallons of gas, on my longest trip, 385 miles, it consumed 7 gallons which left me two gallons when I got home. BTW we pee at Duncan Donuts now because we don't stop at gas stations any more.
 

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Personally I bought a volt (gen 2) first to replace a tdi. I quickly found it didn't have close to enough range on battery alone. It really needed a 20kwh+ usable pack for the winter months. I did find that in ev mode the volt is great to drive, in ice mode, I don't like it. So when we had to trade in our second tdi I got a Bolt since it has enough battery for my daily commute. It has also been able to do my 270 mile weekend trip provided I stop at a dc fast charger.
The bolt is not a long distance ev, charge rates are too slow. The volt will be used for long trips. I would even say that the tm3 would not work as a long distance car. Stopping every 2 hrs (160 miles at 80mph) for 30 min adds too much time on those 1000 mile days.
 

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I pretty much hit the dino juice daily with my 50 mile per day round trip commute and 38 mile rated battery. Sometimes I am able to park at a free charger several blocks away, and sometime I pay $2 per hour at a Chargepoint for the heck of it, but when I bought my volt in 2013, there was no way any BEV except a Tesla could make my daily commute AND give me enough buffer to take some side trips or follow my grade schooler to all the out of town sports events. So the volt g1 was the best vehicle for me at the time. With today's lineup of cars, I might be able to get by with a Bolt with another ICE vehicle as a backup, but the trusty G1 works just fine, no need to swap it out quite yet.
 

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Look at Voltstats it has the info that you want. All Volts, Gen1 and Gen2, average 70% EV, Gen2 Volts are between 75-80% EV.

https://www.voltstats.net
All that have registered with the site, that is, and kept their OnStar accounts active at least the Basic level. That's only like 3000 cars. Statistically relevant, but still not the whole fleet.
 

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I think we are at least 5 years away from the point where a BEV can be your only car unless you are willing to spend $100K. <snip>
This is so dependent on individual driving patterns.

I drive about 6000 miles a year. My 2016 gives 62 to 69 miles a charge depending on the season. My ICE hasn't come on in 15 months except for EMM and FMM.

I would be fine in a Bolt, with my wife's gas car if there were ever any question about needing to drive further. But we haven't taken a car trip in about four years and could rent a car for that if we only had a Bolt.

Not saying an EV would be enough for everyone or even most. But there are plenty of people who could have an EV as their only car right now.
 

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Just curious what you didn't like about ICE mode?

It drives the exact same to me, except for a little engine noise under extreme load. Performance is identical.
That's what I was thinking. It's still basically running like an EV with EV response.
 

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Just curious what you didn't like about ICE mode?

It drives the exact same to me, except for a little engine noise under extreme load. Performance is identical.
On flat ground it's not bad, but when going up hill for long periods of time (I have a 1500 ft climb to get home) the engine revs a lot which is annoying as it seems to make noise with no real increase in speed. I much preferred my tdi which would just spool up the turbo and run the same 2000 rpm as on the flat. Btw I also hate automatic transmissions for the same reason and avoid them when possible.
I am concerned how the volt will handle the climb from Denver to Eisenhower tunnel. In the tdi you simply ran in 6th gear and could hold 70mph to 75 mph. I fear in the volt that will be a long climb at high rpm.

We also drive a lot. We usually drive between 45k to 60k per year between the two of us and the three cars. so far the volt has almost 15k on it and we got it in December with no long trips yet. The bolt has 4500 miles and I got it in May.
 

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On flat ground it's not bad, but when going up hill for long periods of time (I have a 1500 ft climb to get home) the engine revs a lot which is annoying as it seems to make noise with no real increase in speed. I much preferred my tdi which would just spool up the turbo and run the same 2000 rpm as on the flat. Btw I also hate automatic transmissions for the same reason and avoid them when possible.
I am concerned how the volt will handle the climb from Denver to Eisenhower tunnel. In the tdi you simply ran in 6th gear and could hold 70mph to 75 mph. I fear in the volt that will be a long climb at high rpm.

We also drive a lot. We usually drive between 45k to 60k per year between the two of us and the three cars. so far the volt has almost 15k on it and we got it in December with no long trips yet. The bolt has 4500 miles and I got it in May.
I should have filed a low altitude flight plan on Friday. I left Golden with a full charge and flew up to the Evergreen Parkway and used about half my battery. You should be able to make it to Idaho Springs on a full charge. I ran across Kansas against a head wind and my Volt growled along, with less engine noise than my Cruze ECO had. A lot more road noise due to the Michelins but less engine noise.
 

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On flat ground it's not bad, but when going up hill for long periods of time (I have a 1500 ft climb to get home) the engine revs a lot which is annoying as it seems to make noise with no real increase in speed. I much preferred my tdi which would just spool up the turbo and run the same 2000 rpm as on the flat. Btw I also hate automatic transmissions for the same reason and avoid them when possible.
I am concerned how the volt will handle the climb from Denver to Eisenhower tunnel. In the tdi you simply ran in 6th gear and could hold 70mph to 75 mph. I fear in the volt that will be a long climb at high rpm.

We also drive a lot. We usually drive between 45k to 60k per year between the two of us and the three cars. so far the volt has almost 15k on it and we got it in December with no long trips yet. The bolt has 4500 miles and I got it in May.
Just put the car into mountain mode before you hit the mountain and let the engine does what it does. You just have to come to grip with the fact that most of the time, the ICE is disconnected from the wheels, and it will have a mind of its own. When going up long mountain hills, the RPM will climb to generate enough juice to make it up the mountain. Conversely, I've been at stop signs with the engine at wide open throttle before it stops suddenly. The ICE will not act like a normal car, adjusting its speed precisely to the road speed - that is as designed. And theoretically, you should never encounter reduced propulsion mode unless you forget to set mountain mode until it is too late.

I love manual transmissions too. Sadly no EV comes with a manual (though the original Honda Insight hybrid did). I miss my Toyota Supra and BMW 535i, but I still have a CTS with a stick. Plus my son has a Tacoma and a Jetta, daughter in law a Jeep, daughter a Subaru Crosstrek, all manual transmissions. The daughter gets lots of street cred amongst her peers for knowing how to drive standard (which in this day and age is rare and weird).
 

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Just put the car into mountain mode before you hit the mountain and let the engine does what it does. You just have to come to grip with the fact that most of the time, the ICE is disconnected from the wheels, and it will have a mind of its own.
That is true for the Gen 1 Volt but the Gen 2 Volt operates differently in charge sustaining mode. For Gen 2, in the low extended range mode ICE power is split between the wheels and generator MGA. In the fixed ratio extended range mode full ICE power is sent to the wheels. The following article provides a description of Gen 1 and Gen 2 Voltec system operation: http://gm-volt.com/2015/02/20/gen-2-volt-transmission-operating-modes-explained/
 

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I could never buy an all-electric vehicle. My daily commute is only 20 miles, so the electric charge covers local travel. However, I travel into remote wilderness areas every week and took 4,000-mile summer vacation trips the past two years into mountain areas where there is rarely electrical power outlets or charging stations available to me. I charged zero times last summer and charged three times this summer. However, I had 42 MPG last summer in the cooler northern Rockies, while I had only 37 MPG this summer traveling through hundred-degree heat across the deserts. Also, I paid about $10 per night extra for a couple of electric tent sites for charging my battery pack: not an economically-rational expenditure for about $6 in gasoline equivalent enery.
 

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I drive my Gen 1 volt around 90% electric. The choice of an EREV was never about range anxiety for me, it was about convenience. The previous owner drove about 40% electric. I presume she had a long commute with no access to workplace charging. Even with the longer range BEVs being released, I expect a large percentage of EREV owners to stick with them.
 
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