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Seems to me it's the battery warranty that's holding GM up so can I get one today and just sign a freakin waiver on the battery warranty??

My bro-in-law has an AC Propulsion eBox.... they don't really make them anymore but right now I'm seriously thinking that $70k cost aint so bad in the news of $170usd/barrel for oil as recently announced by OPEC. Versus an F350 the fuel savings payback is a lot less than 10yrs. With rising oil prices it'll probably be less than 5yrs at this rate. Electric technology is proven.

The eBox is awesome. I've driven it, had lots of rides in it and it would more than meet my 70km daily commute.

We're lucky up here, electricity is under $0.07/kwh.

At current fuel rates here's how other vehicles compare in monthly fuel costs (most don't consider the fuel cost is a monthly "payment" on top of your lease/loan!):

Diesel is around $1.50/L here now. Gasoline around $1.46/L.
(costs per month for my daily commute)
Hummer H2 $650+
Ford F350 powerstroke crewcab (I have one) $600
VW Golf TDI (family members have these) $200
AC Propulsion eBox $25

Yes... that's right.... a measly $25 bucks to drive ALL MONTH.

Enough waiting already.... the first idiot to come out with an electric with eBox specs:
0-60mph under 7 seconds
95mph top speed
over 150mile range
...gets my $70,000 RIGHT NOW.

Forget 2011 or 2010 for the volt, it's a crisis at the pump NOW.

It's a no-brainer people. I can't believe not one mainstream automaker has an electric car out that seats 4 and offers decent range/performance. Why can AC Propulsion do it and GM can't??
 

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Seems to me it's the battery warranty that's holding GM up so can I get one today and just sign a freakin waiver on the battery warranty??

My bro-in-law has an AC Propulsion eBox.... they don't really make them anymore but right now I'm seriously thinking that $70k cost aint so bad in the news of $170usd/barrel for oil as recently announced by OPEC. Versus an F350 the fuel savings payback is a lot less than 10yrs. With rising oil prices it'll probably be less than 5yrs at this rate. Electric technology is proven.

The eBox is awesome. I've driven it, had lots of rides in it and it would more than meet my 70km daily commute.

We're lucky up here, electricity is under $0.07/kwh.

At current fuel rates here's how other vehicles compare in monthly fuel costs (most don't consider the fuel cost is a monthly "payment" on top of your lease/loan!):

Diesel is around $1.50/L here now. Gasoline around $1.46/L.
(costs per month for my daily commute)
Hummer H2 $650+
Ford F350 powerstroke crewcab (I have one) $600
VW Golf TDI (family members have these) $200
AC Propulsion eBox $25

Yes... that's right.... a measly $25 bucks to drive ALL MONTH.

Enough waiting already.... the first idiot to come out with an electric with eBox specs:
0-60mph under 7 seconds
95mph top speed
over 150mile range
...gets my $70,000 RIGHT NOW.

Forget 2011 or 2010 for the volt, it's a crisis at the pump NOW.

It's a no-brainer people. I can't believe not one mainstream automaker has an electric car out that seats 4 and offers decent range/performance. Why can AC Propulsion do it and GM can't??

They did, it was called the EV1.

But would you pay $80,000 for a saturn? Didn't think so.
 

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They did, it was called the EV1.

But would you pay $80,000 for a saturn? Didn't think so.
If they had made more than 1200 of the EV1s, they would not have cost $80,000. The EV1s were hand built not mass produced. That is like comparing a formula race car to a Chevy Vega.
 

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If they had made more than 1200 of the EV1s, they would not have cost $80,000. The EV1s were hand built not mass produced. That is like comparing a formula race car to a Chevy Vega.
Hand built vs. mass produced doesn't always give you lower costs. Rotary engines are still hand built because it'd be far more expensive to automate the process - even when Mazda was selling hundreds of thousands of rotary engined cars per year.

There are certain components involved in EV production which have high materials cost over and above possible margins that can be reduced by manufacturing efficiency. Copper, for example, has gone up 8 times the value of just a few years ago.
 

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Hand built vs. mass produced doesn't always give you lower costs. Rotary engines are still hand built because it'd be far more expensive to automate the process - even when Mazda was selling hundreds of thousands of rotary engined cars per year.

There are certain components involved in EV production which have high materials cost over and above possible margins that can be reduced by manufacturing efficiency. Copper, for example, has gone up 8 times the value of just a few years ago.
True, but there are enough other components that the cost would have been 1/10th of what they were on the car. The batteries alone would have been cut to 1/5th. I still do not see how they expect to get the cost of the lithium batteries below NiMH when the cost of the components is 5 times higher.
 

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...even when Mazda was selling hundreds of thousands of rotary engined cars per year...
Hundreds of thousands per year is still mass production ;). I think you are confusing automation with mass production. Automation makes mass production easier and cheaper to do in most cases, but you can still mass produce something that's built entirely by hand and have it cheaper than if you produced something in limited quantities.

The question is whether or not GM wanted to produce something in mass quantities. Sure it would bring the cost down, but could they really sell hundreds of thousands of EV1s per year? I doubt it. All they had back then were a handful of environmentalists. A big voice, but a small crowd.

The Volt has a lot more potential for GM to consider mass production. Not only are environmentalists desiring a clean car, but you have people that want something that's cheap to operate, something that looks nice, something that reduces our dependence on foreign oil, something that increases national security, etc... There's a lot more demand this time.
 

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True, but there are enough other components that the cost would have been 1/10th of what they were on the car. The batteries alone would have been cut to 1/5th. I still do not see how they expect to get the cost of the lithium batteries below NiMH when the cost of the components is 5 times higher.
This is not accurate.
 
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