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Discussion Starter #1
Years ago I installed a pair of 120v 20 amp single outlet circuits into my garage so I could run Christmas lights without blowing circuits all over the house. At the time GFCI wasn't a requirement for garages and I've never had a problem with moisture or had the breakers pop. I'd like to upgrade these circuits to current code and swap out the original outlets with GFCI outlets. The outlets are positioned in such a way that they don't qualify for the NEC exceptions to GFCI protected circuits. I'm now using one of these two circuits for my Volt's EVSE and have been unable to find a GFCI outlet that provides equipment ground, which the EVSE requires for operation.

Does anyone know who makes GFCI outlets that provide equipment grounding?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I thought all of those GFCI receptacles provide a ground as standard - the wires going to them have to be live, neutral and ground. I can even see the green ground screw on this one:

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p....et-with-monochromatic-buttons.1000777037.html

Or am I missing something?
So did I. Turns out they don't. The ground isn't passed through to the equipment on many of them. GFCIs are predominately used where you don't have grounded equipment. I'm taking the two GFCIs I purchased last weekend back to Home Depot as "not suitable for purpose."
 

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Does the EVSE not work on those outlets? Fundamentally, a GFCI is monitoring the difference between current on the hot and the neutral, and doesn't actually require a ground conductor to operate. This is the reason that National Electrical Code allows you to use a GFCI breaker or outlet on old 2 conductor wiring without a ground conductor and then install 3 prong receptacles downstream. That said, I've never seen a GFCI outlet that didn't have a ground terminal on it.
 

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The EVSE has its own GFCI circuit, that's one of the things that makes it more than a simple extension cord.
 

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The few times that I have tried to charge my Volt from an outside GFCI outlet, it did not work. I had to run my EVSE inside the unit to a standard outlet. I came to the conclusion that I simply can't charge from a GFCI outlet. Not a big deal with the Volt....but it WOULD be a big deal if I had a Bolt !
 

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I also find it incredible that they wouldn't provide ground as standard. Maybe you had a different problem like defective outlets. I charge on a GFCI circuit, but at a standard outlet downstream from a GFCI outlet, so maybe that is different somehow. If you installed the GFCI at the circuit breaker, maybe that would solve your GFCI problem without creating a ground problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I also find it incredible that they wouldn't provide ground as standard. Maybe you had a different problem like defective outlets. I charge on a GFCI circuit, but at a standard outlet downstream from a GFCI outlet, so maybe that is different somehow. If you installed the GFCI at the circuit breaker, maybe that would solve your GFCI problem without creating a ground problem.
Once I opened the box there was a sticker clearly stating No Equipment Ground even though the GFCI has the standard ground prong for 120v plugs. I checked the outside of the box very closely at that point and nowhere on the outside does it say no equipment ground. When I started researching last night I discovered there's nothing in the GFCI design that precludes equipment grounding - in fact I found the opposite at NEC's web-site - a diagram explicitly showing equipment grounding through a GFCI outlet. So now I'm looking for a pair of GFCI outlets that provide equipment grounding.

The Volt's EVSE puts up a steady red light for "no ground continuity" when you plug into an outlet without equipment ground.
 

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I think you need to hire an electrician. I have no problem charging from a GFCI outlet. Every GFCI outlet I have ever worked with has a ground connection. I think your problem is not the GFCI. As stated above, the GFCI ground connection is not part of the GFCI function and is a simple pass through connection just as it would be with a non GFCI outlet.
 

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The OP here is doing something wrong, and is incorrect. All GFCI's pass the equipment ground through if the ground is wired correctly. This is easy to verify with a 3 prong outlet tester or a multimeter. There will be continuity between the ground screw and the ground prong, I guarantee it. Look at page 15 of the following document for a clear circuit diagram of a GFCI outlet:

https://www.nema.org/Products/Documents/NEMA-GFCI-2012-Field-Representative-Presentation.pdf

Where it does get confusing is that it is legal per NEC code to install a GFCI on an ungrounded (2 wire) circuit. The outlet is required to be labeled "no equipment ground". When you open up a new GFCI package you will notice a few stickers, one of which will be that one.

I have charged my Volt plugged into a GFCI outlet and it worked fine. If it's not working for you, it is likely the outlet is wired incorrectly and the protection circuits in the charge cable are working as designed and protecting against an unsafe condition.
 

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I used to charge off of a GFCI. Technically it was an outlet daisy chained after the GFCI outlet (I know, I know, dedicated outlet and all that junk, but it was a 20A circuit and only the garage door was on the same circuit).
 

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Once I opened the box there was a sticker clearly stating No Equipment Ground even though the GFCI has the standard ground prong for 120v plugs. I checked the outside of the box very closely at that point and nowhere on the outside does it say no equipment ground. When I started researching last night I discovered there's nothing in the GFCI design that precludes equipment grounding - in fact I found the opposite at NEC's web-site - a diagram explicitly showing equipment grounding through a GFCI outlet. So now I'm looking for a pair of GFCI outlets that provide equipment grounding.

The Volt's EVSE puts up a steady red light for "no ground continuity" when you plug into an outlet without equipment ground.
That sticker has nothing to do with the GFCI outlet. It is to be pasted on the GFCI outlet cover and any other downstream outlets as a warning when the GFCI is connected to a circuit where a ground is not available. You have a ground problem in your house wiring. Make sure the ground wire runs all the way to the panel... it can't be connected to a water pipe, or daisy chained off another circuit.

Sorry to be direct, but this is clearly explained in the directions that come with the GFCI. You really should have a sparky come out and do the work for you. Shade tree electrical work can reduce your house to ashes.
 

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Reading back to what the OP just posted, I can see it is the sticker that was confusing. The sticker is intended to be used if and *only* if you do not have a ground wire attached. And the "GFCI protected" stickers are intended to be used if and *only* you install regular outlets downstream of the GFCI outlet.

If you are doing your own electrical work, a certain level of industry knowledge is assumed by the manufacturers.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
The OP here is doing something wrong, and is incorrect. All GFCI's pass the equipment ground through if the ground is wired correctly. This is easy to verify with a 3 prong outlet tester or a multimeter. There will be continuity between the ground screw and the ground prong, I guarantee it. Look at page 15 of the following document for a clear circuit diagram of a GFCI outlet:

https://www.nema.org/Products/Documents/NEMA-GFCI-2012-Field-Representative-Presentation.pdf

Where it does get confusing is that it is legal per NEC code to install a GFCI on an ungrounded (2 wire) circuit. The outlet is required to be labeled "no equipment ground". When you open up a new GFCI package you will notice a few stickers, one of which will be that one.

I have charged my Volt plugged into a GFCI outlet and it worked fine. If it's not working for you, it is likely the outlet is wired incorrectly and the protection circuits in the charge cable are working as designed and protecting against an unsafe condition.
Turns out this is an invalid assumption. Inside the GFCI box was a label insert (not a sticker) that very clearly stated:

NO EQUIPMENT GROUND

in multiple languages. This, on a GFCI rated for outdoor usage. This notice was nowhere on the outside of the box or I wouldn't have purchased it. Thus my question about finding a GFCI that does support equipment grounding. 120V house wiring is actually relatively easy and I have installed other 20 amp circuits in the house. At the time there was no requirement for GFCI for garage circuits.

On the flip side I verified that I used the wrap method for the wires when I installed the outlet in the first place. I've never liked the push in concept for wiring as I can't see inside the outlet to verify good and solid mechanical connections. 10 gauge wire is hard to wrap around the screws but I wrapped so I could visually verify a good mechanical connection to the outlet. The two circuit lengths are 10 ft and 40 ft and I'm using the shorter one for my EVSE.

I read the document you posted. I also found some other documentation from NEMA showing GFCI circuits with equipment grounding and believe it or not, some without equipment grounding. While working yesterday I opened my breaker panel to double-check that I had originally wired the circuits properly, verifying the hot, neutral, and ground wires at the breaker box to verify I had wired the circuit correctly in the first place (the insulators on this cable are Black, Red, and none - go figure) and I had indeed secured Black to the hot leg and Red to the Neutral leg with none obviously going to Ground. The original installation was done prior to the 1997 NEC update requiring GFCIs in garages and everything is still in good shape and cobweb free.

I'll be hiring an electrician to install my 240V circuit. I'll be using 6 gauge for this but only putting a 20 amp breaker and receptacle at this time. It'll parallel the 10 ft circuit currently installed.
 

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Did you try wiring it? Did you get an error code on the EVSE? If so, is it possible the hot and neutral wires were reversed? And if that is the case, maybe an electrician should be brought in.
 

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Turns out this is an invalid assumption. Inside the GFCI box was a label that very clearly stated:

NO EQUIPMENT GROUND
Because of the later post explaining the various stickers (and their use) that come with a GFCI device. If you have a ground, don't use the sticker.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
For those who think I don't have a ground line, my sprinkler system controller is "load" tied to the outlet and it also requires a ground to operate as it's an outdoor controller mounted inside the garage. It worked properly with the GFCI as it connects to the load and ground screws on the back of the outlet.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Did you try wiring it? Did you get an error code on the EVSE? If so, is it possible the hot and neutral wires were reversed? And if that is the case, maybe an electrician should be brought in.
Yes - the solid red light on the EVSE which the tag shows is a no ground alert. I double checked the wiring as well, both at the breaker panel and at the outlet to ensure I hadn't misrouted the wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Because of the later post explaining the various stickers (and their use) that come with a GFCI device. If you have a ground, don't use the sticker.
Not a sticker (sorry for the confusion on this item). It was an insert shoved in the box and not printed on the outside of the box. The downstream load screws did have a sticker on them noting not to use them for the incoming wiring. The instructions clearly showed them in use when there are downstream outlets or other equipment on the circuit however, so this wasn't the issue.
 

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If you really have a no ground outlet, then it seems your problem would be solved by returning it and buying almost anything else.
 
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