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After almost 8 months and about 10,000 miles, I finally swapped out the GFCI outlet that I'd been using to charge my 2017 Volt. Replacing it with a normal outlet has completely eliminated the sporadic and annoying habit it used to have of intermittently interrupting the charging due to a "ground fault". The car would beep, the app would text me, and I'd have to go out to the garage and either unplug it and plug it back in, or push the red button on the GFCI outlet. Then it would start charging again.
Ever since I got rid of the GFCI outlet the problem has completely disappeared. A word to the wise--the Volt did not always behave when plugged into a 120V outlet "protected" by a GFCI. Without it, no problems.
 

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Keep in mind that the GFCI outlet may have been protecting other (non-GFCI) outlets downstream. If so, you may want to replace the next downstream outlet with the GFCI outlet that you removed so that the rest of the outlets aren't unprotected.

For example, in my home, the GFCI outlet in the garage protects all the outlets on the outside of my house.

Of course, the best option is to run a dedicated 240v circuit for charging the Volt. :)
 

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Also, outlets in garages lower that 8 feet from the floor should be GFCI protected per code. Garage door operators usually plug into an outlet in the ceiling and don't require GFCI.

If you "fix" it by just unplug/replug that is potentially a different issue than having to reset the GFCI. However, it could be the GFCI outlet doesn't trip when it should so you don't have to reset it. Possibly a better repair would be to purchase a high quality GFCI outlet and install it as a replacement. Some GFCI outlets indicate in the documentation that they should be replaced every so often.

VIN # B0985
 

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Keep in mind that the GFCI outlet may have been protecting other (non-GFCI) outlets downstream. If so, you may want to replace the next downstream outlet with the GFCI outlet that you removed so that the rest of the outlets aren't unprotected.

For example, in my home, the GFCI outlet in the garage protects all the outlets on the outside of my house.
My understanding is that they measure the difference in current between hot and neutral (i.e. to sense a leak to ground).
If that's correct, to protect multiple outlets wouldn't need to be a GFI breaker?
Otherwise how can it possibly sense the current in the other outlets?
 

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When I bought my used 2013 Volt, I had a 120V GFCI outlet installed where I park it. The car lives outside. It had sporadically tripped the GFCI outlet, which was annoying, as you said. The electrician came back and swapped out the GFCI outlet for a non-GFCI outlet. Since it is outdoors and somewhat exposed to the elements, I was uncomfortable without the GFCI protection. I bought another GFCI outlet and swapped it again. No troubles in almost a year of use.

My take-away: some GFCI outlets (even brand new ones) are pickier than others. Maybe try swapping it.
 

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Each EVSE includes a GFCI. When two are used in tandem it is not uncommon for one to trip the other.

KNS
 

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My understanding is that they measure the difference in current between hot and neutral (i.e. to sense a leak to ground).
If that's correct, to protect multiple outlets wouldn't need to be a GFI breaker?
Otherwise how can it possibly sense the current in the other outlets?
That is how they work. The GFCI outlet will have a line side and a load side. Downstream outlets are attached via the load side and are thus protected. The last GFCI outlet I purchased even came with stickers to place on the downstream outlets indicating they were GFCI protected upstream.
 

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The last GFCI outlet I purchased even came with stickers to place on the downstream outlets indicating they were GFCI protected upstream.
So did the most recent GFCI outlets that I have purchased. I didn't put those stickers on the down stream outlets, and I would be surprised if very many others have either - did you?

VIN # B0985
 

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GFCI's are quite sensitive and often fail. Which is why you don't want one on your refrigerator. The guys who wired my house put the kitchen gfci on the next outlet after the reefer, so it wouldn't be affected if the gfci tripped. Since the EVSE is by design a rather sophisticated GFCI, you don't need another one.
 

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Since the EVSE is by design a rather sophisticated GFCI, you don't need another one.
And IIRC, the manual for the EVSE even states there may be issues with GFCI outlets and to not use them.
But most people have no choice as code requires it on external outlets so 99% of exterior outlets will already be GFCI. And that remaining 1% is probably so old that it should be changed prior to using a high load device to reduce the chances of overheating and charred cords.
 

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That is how they work. The GFCI outlet will have a line side and a load side. Downstream outlets are attached via the load side and are thus protected.
Right, but I thought the GFI was built into the outlet body. And that you couldn't daisy chain from terminals, well at least not legally.
 
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