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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a 2014 Gen 1 owner who gets about 37miles normally. Most days I drive purely on battery, but one day/week I have a 52-58 mile round trip. It's about 90% on so-cal freeways, so speeds are 70mph or so, and temperatures are moderate. About 200 feet of elevation change. I'm happy running 40-42psi in my tires.

In my 2014 volt I usually burn about 0.4 to 0.6 gallons of gas on this trip.

If I had a gen 2, could I make this drive purely on battery?

It sounds like I'm just about at the Gen2 range, so the worst case would be if the engine turned on just as I was getting home (startups and short runs are the dirtiest time for a gas engine).
 

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I'm a 2014 Gen 1 owner who gets about 37miles normally. Most days I drive purely on battery, but one day/week I have a 52-58 mile round trip. It's about 90% on so-cal freeways, so speeds are 70mph or so, and temperatures are moderate. About 200 feet of elevation change. I'm happy running 40-42psi in my tires.

In my 2014 volt I usually burn about 0.4 to 0.6 gallons of gas on this trip.

If I had a gen 2, could I make this drive purely on battery?

It sounds like I'm just about at the Gen2 range, so the worst case would be if the engine turned on just as I was getting home (startups and short runs are the dirtiest time for a gas engine).
I consistently get 58 miles in "moderate" weather when driving a sustained 55 mph. If you are driving faster than that or using heavy climate control I would not expect to do 58 miles gas free... but for some reason you gave a range between 52 and 58 miles... take the 52 mile route with no climate control and slow down if possible and you can be all electric.... or you can purchase a Bolt :)

Your 2014 has an EPA rated range of 38 miles... if you are burning .4 to .6 gal of gas on the 52 to 58 mile and figure you get around 20 miles on the ICE on that much gasoline, so for the trip it sounds like you are getting somewhere between 32 ad 38 miles of range from your battery... so figure on that drive you would get the EPA rated range or a bit less in the 2nd gen just like you are in your 2014.

Keith
 

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Thanks fourDoor - the 52-58 difference is mostly a stop for lunch or not. Around here, driving 55 would be a serious road hazard. Even driving only 65 sometimes feels dangerous (when you are getting passed by people going 80). Sounds like a Gen2 would reduce my gas consumption, but would still burn some gas.

Anyone out there have an estimate for Gen 2 miles possible at steady 70mph?
 

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Gen 1 EPA was 38 miles on battery. you did 37, that is 97.3% of EPA number
Gen 2 EPA is 53 miles on battery this means you would likely do 52 miles with a Gen 2 if driving the same way

That said I routinely do 64 miles on a Gen2, so if changing your driving, you could do more :)
 

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Slow down to 60-65 and you'll easily get that range I think. I get at least 58 miles per day with 40 of them being round trip over the Newhall Pass on I5, against traffic, so I can maintain 65 most of the trip without traffic slowing me down.

It's all about speed. Stay to the right and you won't get to much hate for not going 70+.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

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I doubt that you could make it at 70, depending on your other driving habits. Just slowing to 65 would make a significant difference.
 

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Thanks fourDoor - the 52-58 difference is mostly a stop for lunch or not. Around here, driving 55 would be a serious road hazard. Even driving only 65 sometimes feels dangerous (when you are getting passed by people going 80). Sounds like a Gen2 would reduce my gas consumption, but would still burn some gas.

Anyone out there have an estimate for Gen 2 miles possible at steady 70mph?
At a steady 70 mph I get 44.5 miles of range out of 14.0 kWh of energy, just shy of 3.2 miles per kWh. At a steady 55 mph with no AC, (fan only) I can do 60 miles, just shy of 4.3 miles per kWh.

Keith
 

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To the OP, I'd think it will work for you -- I regularly do my (just shy of) 58 mile round trip commute on battery only in my 2017, in the D.C. Metro area.

Mix of local roads (lights & stop/go) and highway "keeping up with traffic" (i.e., ~70 mph on some stretches), brief acceleration bursts and a few elevation changes, occasionally passing left lane nappers. Regen braking makes it work.

As you can read elsewhere on the forum, sustained high speeds (over 60-65 mph for my commute) or lots of heavy/max acceleration will eat into range. E.g., when traffic is very light -- or I push it (OK have fun) -- I might arrive home with no electric range left or occasionally using a tenth or two of a gallon.

I've done several 400-500 mile WV & MD 'mountain' road trips -- electric at the beginning and end, hold/hybrid in the hills -- at interstate speeds, including passing -- and the Volt did great (electric boost up hills or passing is effective). On the return trip you can pick when to switch back to electric to maximize overall mileage.

It's not a sports car but you never feel underpowered -- especially with the electric torque off the line!
 

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I'd map your route using EVTripPlanner and play with speeds and temps. Speed kills.

EVTripPlanner takes elevation changes into account along with temps and speeds. The Tesla guys swear by its accuracy.

Set it up for a Tesla 60 with 19" wheels and then Select Direct Route not via Superchargers. It will tell you how much energy is needed.
 

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Listen to Keith's quantitative info and lack of subjectivity. He's correct.
 

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In my observations the Gen II Volt seems to take a bigger overall hit at high speeds than the Gen I Volt did.

Normally at average speeds of 50mph in good weather I can get 70 miles range. But at 70mph that quickly drops to around 50 miles range.

In my 2013 Gen I 50mph would yield me about 50miles. And at 70mph it would be about 40 miles range in good weather.
 

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I doubt that you could make it at 70, depending on your other driving habits. Just slowing to 65 would make a significant difference.
At a steady 70 mph I get 44.5 miles of range out of 14.0 kWh of energy, just shy of 3.2 miles per kWh. At a steady 55 mph with no AC, (fan only) I can do 60 miles, just shy of 4.3 miles per kWh.

Keith
Agree with both of these. It would be hard to make the distance at 70mph but somewhere between 60 and 65 might do it.
 

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I do a run like this weekly in my Gen2. Full charge, get on the freeway and set cruise at 70mph and run the battery out. It goes exactly 46 miles before main engine start.
 

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I do a run like this weekly in my Gen2. Full charge, get on the freeway and set cruise at 70mph and run the battery out. It goes exactly 46 miles before main engine start.
Seems like the 2nd gen volt is very consistent in it's energy usage, do you normaly get a bit more than 14 kWh out of yours? I don't do long trips often, so I have less data for comparison, I suspect that if my car had gone to 14.4 or 14.5 kWh used I could have made 46 miles at 70 mph.

Off topic:

Is there any information on why some Volts get 14.0 and others get 14.5 kWh? Does it have to do with weather or not you run the battery empty on a regular basis? I use about 9 kWh on a typical commute day, and only take trips longer than that every few months, so my battery typically cycles between 14.0 kWh available fully charged down to 5 kWh remaining (based on remaining range available on the guess o meter, and subtracting 9 kWh from 14 kWh) when I plug it in at night. Weekends I typically use much less, and am driving at slower speeds, so the only time my battery gets a full cycle is once every few months when I will take a 1000+ mile round trip with one re-charge at the far end.

Later,

Keith
 

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It sounds like I'm just about at the Gen2 range, so the worst case would be if the engine turned on just as I was getting home (startups and short runs are the dirtiest time for a gas engine).
I'm in your area and although there are many variables (most notably as others have pointed out, speed and HVAC system), I'd say the answer is most of the time, no you won't be able to do your full So Cal commute on these freeways at proper traffic speeds with battery only. You will many days of the year run the AC, a handful of times you may even run the heater early or late albeit infrequent.

Above being said, you can get somewhat close. The way you do it is this IMHO, go battery only to work. Maybe you go to lunch as you said, sometimes not. Either way, when you get in to go home, look at the displayed EV range left, start on battery to get to the freeway, once on flip it to Hold mode until you get to a point in your commute that you feel you will barely get home on the remaining EV range. You'll figure that out after a few times and you'll pull into your garage with nothing or maybe 1-2 miles left on the battery. It's OK to burn a little gas on that way home at freeway speeds, the engine will give you low 40s MPG, very efficient.

I continue to be amazed at the amount of engineering put into this machine. It really is like looking at HDTV for the first time (at least for me).
 

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Around here, driving 55 would be a serious road hazard. Even driving only 65 sometimes feels dangerous ?
I've found the opposite to be true, people seem to actually notice you and avoid you if you are under the limit. Near the speed limit or even a tad over the text zombies can't seem to see you. I've almost been rearend several times driving over the limit, flash your 4 ways and they seem to swerve at the last moment.

This Coming from a guy that has driven 55 in Montana, Chicago , Texas , Minnesota, north and South Dakota.

I've also found that even if you take your car up to 105mph you still get passed. After that experience I've learned to just drive the speed I want.
 

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To the OP, are you adding to your fleet or considering replacing your g1 with a g2? All the math tells me that the extra cost of the g2 will never give you a return on investment, which is why I'm still in my g1. Now if the g2 got 100 miles of EV range, then I might consider paying for the upgrade to a bigger battery.

With Tesla routinely offering different sized batteries, I wonder why GM doesn't do the same. Some people live a few miles from work while others have longer commutes.
 

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If I can get US Bank to deal, I might buy out my 2014 at end of lease: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?259601

If I can't then it's either a 2017 Volt, 2017 Bolt, or get a bike until the Tesla Model 3s are out :)

I'm thinking about the Bolt seriously: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?260649
If you don't already have a reservation for a TM3, that's going to be a mighty long bike ride. I had a reservation placed the night of the reveal, but upon further review, it appears that the tm3 is about the size of a volt and my family needs a bigger car. I hope the bolt sells like crazy. But that is also too small for us. GM< give me a voltec suburban already!!!
 
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