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Yes, and exactly what I'll setup eventually. I already have the off-grid 12V backup power distribution in my house. Although you actually need a 120V split phase inverter (US). Code compliance is an issue, but there are manual and automatic load control systems that can achieve this.
edk-austin
have you successfully turn on your grid-tie inverter with simulated pure sine-wave 220vac inverter ? if so, what is the model of the 12vdc->220vac inverter ? and the model of your grid-tie inverter ? thanks
 

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According to service manuals, the Gen 1 Volt has a 180A APM, and the Gen 2 Volt has a 130A APM.

That 130A APM translates to roughly 1560W of power at 12V, so I wouldn't go much above a 1000W continuous power draw on the Gen 2, to make sure you don't tax that APM too much or cause a dead battery, electronics damage in the car, etc. etc.

The other question that has never had a definitive answer, is how much power the vehicle requires from 12V, with all user-controlled accessories turned off. If it's more than 300-400W, well then my proposed continuous power draw of 1000W should also be adjusted accordingly.

Note: While the APM may output higher than 12V, for the purposes of this discussion it seems safer to just assume 12V and chalk up the difference to some extra design margin.
 

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Instead of installing the evextend wireing kit is there a problem of just clipping the inverter directly to the 12v battery post. Seems to be more useful and cheaper for occasional use
 

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Instead of installing the evextend wireing kit is there a problem of just clipping the inverter directly to the 12v battery post. Seems to be more useful and cheaper for occasional use
For occasional use, that is fine. You just need to make sure the alligator clips are secure, and nothing is going to bump them. If they get bumped they could cause sparks.
 

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Yes, that is fine. The EVextend kit is mostly for convenience (plus it adds a fuse). It allows you to connect quickly and without lifting the cargo floor, and possibly also the tray under the cargo floor, depending on your set-up, which is a hassle. For camping use, it would be very handy. For emergency use, it is not necessary.
 

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Instead of installing the evextend wireing kit is there a problem of just clipping the inverter directly to the 12v battery post. Seems to be more useful and cheaper for occasional use
Yes! It's less safe in that there is no inline fuse, and it is a bit more inconvenient in that you need the floor space lifted up, etc. and doesn't have the "quick" DC connectors, but it's certainly an option that people have used on vehicles in the past.
 

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Thanks all for your input. I think I will just hook up with clips at the battery post since the inverter will be for emergency use only. I will put a inline fuse on the hot wire to be safe.
 

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To influence having an emergency power out (V2H) option on the next GM EV we buy, complete this on-line survey: svpus.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9B7TyWEsS2Xg5W5?source=facebook

We have been discussing this on the Volt Owner Facebook page and it was suggested that we would get more attention from GM if we got more than the few Facebook Page owners to provide responses.

We are told that, being a factory rather than a 3rd party option, using it as intended would not adversely impact the warranty.

Rather than just 300W capable, we are looking to see if we can have 1500W to 9000W options. But, we need to prove that there is demand for it. So, complete the survey and we will forward the results to the right people.
 
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Hello and thank you every one for this information!
We have recently had 2 Big storms here in New England that had a devastating effect on our power grid for days. Luckily my home wasn't effected as bad as others that I have seen but it got me motivated to seek for a way to possibly use my Gen2 volt for emergency power if needed since these storms have been getting much more powerful and more frequent.
Might I add that I do have a 2000kw gas/lpg sine wave generator but don't like using it because it is to difficult keeping it protected from deep snow and heavy rain, it keeps me up at night by constantly shoveling the snow away from it because I don't have adequate place to run it outside, it's to difficult for my wife to start it when I'm not home and I see a lot of wasted fuel when items like the refrigerator or pellet stove cycles off.
My only 2 dilemmas I have with using my volt for emergency power is; #1 choosing either a 1500 to 3000watt or 1000 to 2000watt inverter since I have read some where on this forum that Gen2 has a smaller 1530 watt APM. #2 Finding out what my true peak surge amperage is for my refrigerator and pellet stove since most every where I read it could be 1.5 to 4 times what the running watts are.
I have figured out how to accomplish #2 by purchasing a electrical clamp meter with Max-Min option for $45. and a AC line splitter for $15. (even thought I could make my own splitter) but when I do get them and actually test the refrigerator and pellet stove to get the true peak surge, if it dose go slightly over 1500watts I guess this means I should get the 1500 to 3000 inverter.
This raises more questions on if this brief 1-2 second surge on the battery is ok and if my 1530watt APM can still recover the battery from this brief surge?
 

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I realize this is an ancient thread, but I've been pondering this question as well. In the Volt, we have this amazing, high-capacity source of energy that literally could save lives during a storm if it were able to be used as a backup power source for the home.

A number of people have suggested that it would be ideal if one could get a high-voltage/high-power DC to AC inverter so that the main batteries could be tapped directly.

While I haven't tried this, here's a possible solution - use a solar inverter. These take in high voltage DC from a string of solar panels and pump out AC to run your home. They automatically accept voltages up to 600VDC converting it to utility-grace AC output.

The problem is, all the readily available inverters are "grid-tie", meaning they're only supposed to operate when there's utility power present - they feed power on to the grid.

A kludge might be to use a small inverter tied to the 12V battery (the same setup discussed extensively in this thread) to trick a grid-tie inverter into thinking that the grid is active. Someone clever could probably also figure out a more elegant method to bypass the requirement for grid-tie.

Of course, you'd absolutely need to connect this to a transfer switch to avoid sending voltage back into the grid. These are readily available for generators. You'd also need to get access to the high-voltage feed from the Volt's batteries.

Chevy Volt HVDC ---> Solar inverter ---> Transfer switch ---> Home power

Grid power -----------------------------------------^
 

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My Volt is powering my home as I type this. I had started putting together an inverter system as described at the beginning of this thread some time ago. A 4 and a half hour county wide power outage a few weeks ago was the impetus I needed to finish it. I did so last week, and today we are being with yet another countywide outage. I had electricity from my Volt powering stuff in my house within about 10 minutes.

I belong to an emergency communications ham radio group, so must of my concern was getting my radio gear up and working. That was fast and easy. I am pleased to find that Comcast Cable Internet has stayed up and working thoughout this widespread outage. I hadn't expected that and it is a pleasant surprise.

So thank you goes out to my Volt for keeping the lights on and to the OP for suggesting this.
 

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My Volt is powering my home as I type this. I had started putting together an inverter system as described at the beginning of this thread some time ago. A 4 and a half hour county wide power outage a few weeks ago was the impetus I needed to finish it. I did so last week, and today we are being with yet another countywide outage. I had electricity from my Volt powering stuff in my house within about 10 minutes.

I belong to an emergency communications ham radio group, so must of my concern was getting my radio gear up and working. That was fast and easy. I am pleased to find that Comcast Cable Internet has stayed up and working thoughout this widespread outage. I hadn't expected that and it is a pleasant surprise.

So thank you goes out to my Volt for keeping the lights on and to the OP for suggesting this.
Can you tell me how you keep the Volt's electronics powered up so the high-voltage battery will continue to charge the 12-V battery? I tried running an inverter from my 2016 Volt during a power outage yesterday; after a couple of hours, the Volt would power down. I had to restart the Volt several times to make it through the outage. Thanks.
 

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Can you tell me how you keep the Volt's electronics powered up so the high-voltage battery will continue to charge the 12-V battery?
Just use a heavy duty rubber band to keep the shifter button depressed. The computers will then not realize the car is in Park and therefore not limit you to the normal 150 minutes before shutdown.
 

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Just use a heavy duty rubber band to keep the shifter button depressed. The computers will then not realize the car is in Park and therefore not limit you to the normal 150 minutes before shutdown.
Thanks! I thought I had seen this hint somewhere but couldn't find it with an hour plus of searching this morning.

Do you happen to know the thread size of the bolts on the Volt (Gen 2)'s 12 V battery? I was hoping to find bolts to hold the cables in place.
 

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Do you happen to know the thread size of the bolts on the Volt (Gen 2)'s 12 V battery? I was hoping to find bolts to hold the cables in place.
I do not know (Gen1 here), but I can't understand why you can't put the cables under the existing bolts.
 

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My thought was I wanted to get wing nuts (preferably with insulated wings) so I could quickly but securely add (and remove) the cables. My one day of use was using jumper cables with alligator clips. Not a good solution if I'm drawing an appreciable fraction of a KW. It all worked but I was nervous.
 
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