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The first generation Volt, particularly the 2011, will likely be a collector's car. Heck, even GM designed it that way by putting the VIN on the center stack at startup in the early builds. It was a revolutionary vehicle for many reasons given GM's history. It also helps that it was a "polarizing" car, subject to political controversy--adding historical interest.

That brings us to Gen 2. Some have speculated that the Volt will be discontinued in the early 2020s or morphed into something else, like a crossover. It's also been surpassed in some ways by the Bolt EV, which has other significance.

What do you think? Is the 2011 the only "collectible" Volt? Would Gen 2 share the same long-term historical value?
 

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I collected both a 2011 Volt and a 2017 Bolt EV. I'm like Jay Leno, but with just two cars in my garage, haha.
 

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It's doubtful. Early 2011, RHD models ( holden Volts ), the Ampera and the ELR have much more of a shot of being a collectible car.

It's sheer numbers and rarity and condition.
 

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Anyone can collect a car, and yes, in 20-30 years there probably won't be many 1st gen Volts left out there, but that doesn't automatically mean it's going to be worth huge money.

Look at 80's Corvettes for example - lots of great "collector cars" out there, but they do not command any huge value unless there was something particularly special about that car in particular - pace cars, etc.
 

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I have a 2016 with a build date of July 2015, It must be a very early unit off the line. From stories I've read, production for California started in August. I wonder if mine will be collectible? Supposedly, it was a demo for a GM executive and it went straight from the factory floor to them-it never went to a dealer.
 

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I collected both a 2011 Volt and a 2017 Bolt EV. I'm like Jay Leno, but with just two cars in my garage, haha.
Well, you only have 148 cars to go to catch up with Jay. :) FWIW Jay bought a Volt early on. Not sure if he still has it. He has a few other electrics, including his antique Baker Electric and hybrid Owen-Magnetic. (Both Baker and Owen Magnetic had regenerative braking 100 years ago!)
 

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In 30 years there will be more 55-57 Chevy on the road then gen 1 Volts.
Right now, here in Australia, I'm pretty certain there are more 55-57 Chevies on the road here than Volts.

In likely fact, there have always been, as we have approximately 280 Volts on this continent, all gen 1, and no gen 2 that I know of.
(Maybe they tested some at the local proving grounds)
 

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Years from now when EVs are the norm historians will look back to see which vehicles played a critical role in the transition from fossil fuel to electricity. I think three vehicles will stand out, Tesla Model S, Chevy Volt, and Nissan Leaf. These vehicles will be important if collectors values historical significance in their collections.
 

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Years from now when EVs are the norm historians will look back to see which vehicles played a critical role in the transition from fossil fuel to electricity. I think three vehicles will stand out, Tesla Model S, Chevy Volt, and Nissan Leaf. These vehicles will be important if collectors values historical significance in their collections.
I think historical significance and collectable are two completely different things.
 

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Volts are throw away cars.
Just like 99% of everything else produced today.


They are too complex to be of interest to car hobbyists.
Heck, there is barely anyone now who knows how to fix them.

I can't remember the last time I touched anything under the hood of a car. I think it was in the 90s. There just aren't any user serviceable parts anymore. Even a comprehensive set of mechanics tools doesn't get you very far. You need specialized knowledge, and a computer analyzer before you even begin.
 

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Ah, come on. I've even got the welcome kit (book, brochure, and flip camera). That makes it collectible, right? j/k :)
Run over to Mecum and put it on the block then. Let us know how you do! ;)

ELR has a better chance of being collectible. I think the issue will be replacement batteries when these cars get old enough to qualify as classics. There's little chance that the OEM battery will have anything left to give.
 
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