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The first generation Volt, particularly the 2011, will likely be a collector's car. Heck, even GM designed it that way by putting the VIN on the center stack at startup in the early builds. It was a revolutionary vehicle for many reasons given GM's history. It also helps that it was a "polarizing" car, subject to political controversy--adding historical interest.

That brings us to Gen 2. Some have speculated that the Volt will be discontinued in the early 2020s or morphed into something else, like a crossover. It's also been surpassed in some ways by the Bolt EV, which has other significance.

What do you think? Is the 2011 the only "collectible" Volt? Would Gen 2 share the same long-term historical value?
 

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I collected both a 2011 Volt and a 2017 Bolt EV. I'm like Jay Leno, but with just two cars in my garage, haha.
 

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It's doubtful. Early 2011, RHD models ( holden Volts ), the Ampera and the ELR have much more of a shot of being a collectible car.

It's sheer numbers and rarity and condition.
 

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Anyone can collect a car, and yes, in 20-30 years there probably won't be many 1st gen Volts left out there, but that doesn't automatically mean it's going to be worth huge money.

Look at 80's Corvettes for example - lots of great "collector cars" out there, but they do not command any huge value unless there was something particularly special about that car in particular - pace cars, etc.
 

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I have a 2016 with a build date of July 2015, It must be a very early unit off the line. From stories I've read, production for California started in August. I wonder if mine will be collectible? Supposedly, it was a demo for a GM executive and it went straight from the factory floor to them-it never went to a dealer.
 

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I collected both a 2011 Volt and a 2017 Bolt EV. I'm like Jay Leno, but with just two cars in my garage, haha.
Well, you only have 148 cars to go to catch up with Jay. :) FWIW Jay bought a Volt early on. Not sure if he still has it. He has a few other electrics, including his antique Baker Electric and hybrid Owen-Magnetic. (Both Baker and Owen Magnetic had regenerative braking 100 years ago!)
 

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In 30 years there will be more 55-57 Chevy on the road then gen 1 Volts.
Right now, here in Australia, I'm pretty certain there are more 55-57 Chevies on the road here than Volts.

In likely fact, there have always been, as we have approximately 280 Volts on this continent, all gen 1, and no gen 2 that I know of.
(Maybe they tested some at the local proving grounds)
 

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Years from now when EVs are the norm historians will look back to see which vehicles played a critical role in the transition from fossil fuel to electricity. I think three vehicles will stand out, Tesla Model S, Chevy Volt, and Nissan Leaf. These vehicles will be important if collectors values historical significance in their collections.
 

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Years from now when EVs are the norm historians will look back to see which vehicles played a critical role in the transition from fossil fuel to electricity. I think three vehicles will stand out, Tesla Model S, Chevy Volt, and Nissan Leaf. These vehicles will be important if collectors values historical significance in their collections.
I think historical significance and collectable are two completely different things.
 

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In 30 years there will be more 55-57 Chevy on the road then gen 1 Volts.
And the reason will be that it takes a lot less skill to keep a 55-57 Chevy on the road. Volts are throw away cars. They are too complex to be of interest to car hobbyists. Once they are good and broke it's time to recycle them.
 

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Volts are throw away cars.
Just like 99% of everything else produced today.


They are too complex to be of interest to car hobbyists.
Heck, there is barely anyone now who knows how to fix them.

I can't remember the last time I touched anything under the hood of a car. I think it was in the 90s. There just aren't any user serviceable parts anymore. Even a comprehensive set of mechanics tools doesn't get you very far. You need specialized knowledge, and a computer analyzer before you even begin.
 

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The only thing GM will cancel is the name. Some sort of voltec propulsion technology will carry on to a vehicle platform that is more popular than a small cruze sized bean can.
 

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Ah, come on. I've even got the welcome kit (book, brochure, and flip camera). That makes it collectible, right? j/k :)
Run over to Mecum and put it on the block then. Let us know how you do! ;)

ELR has a better chance of being collectible. I think the issue will be replacement batteries when these cars get old enough to qualify as classics. There's little chance that the OEM battery will have anything left to give.
 

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Please don't even joke about it being "collectable". GM already thinks every car they make is a "limited edition" and prices like they are selling to collectors.
 

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LOL collector car. Not gonna happen with this car. Maybe a few Gen 1 Volts.
 
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