GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2012 Volt is due for its second yearly emissions test. It failed the test a year ago. I am almost entirely electric and the gas engine had not been run for weeks. So, after failing the test, I stopped plugging in, accumulated 100 consecutive gas miles, and passed the emissions test on the second try.

I hated to waste the gas! :(

MY QUESTION: How many consecutive gas miles do you typically drive in order to get the engine specs suitable for passing the emissions test?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
My 2012 Volt is due for its second yearly emissions test. It failed the test a year ago. I am almost entirely electric and the gas engine had not been run for weeks. So, after failing the test, I stopped plugging in, accumulated 100 consecutive gas miles, and passed the emissions test on the second try.

I hated to waste the gas! :(

MY QUESTION: How many consecutive gas miles do you typically drive in order to get the engine specs suitable for passing the emissions test?

I'd be contacting someone in the state testing program and ask them. Do they sample exhaust or just plug into the onboard diagnostic port?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,150 Posts
Try 25 miles on gas and see if it passes. If not, add another 25.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
Try 25 miles on gas and see if it passes. If not, add another 25.
I'd try just driving to the testing station in Hold. But really, I'd like someone in the program to explain why an emissions program doesn't account for cars like the Volt and why they're actually making the car burn more gas just to test them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
Probably because they need to burn gas to test the emissions equipment. They sit unused for so long the car needs to do a self check to make sure everything is in order. It can't do that without burning fuel.

It's ok. You burned less than 3 gallons of fuel. You didn't kill the planet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
I'd try just driving to the testing station in Hold. But really, I'd like someone in the program to explain why an emissions program doesn't account for cars like the Volt and why they're actually making the car burn more gas just to test them.
I would think this is all you need to do. Starting a car just when testing starts, doesn't make sense. Everybody else rolls up with a warm engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'd be contacting someone in the state testing program and ask them. Do they sample exhaust or just plug into the onboard diagnostic port?
They just plug into the OBDC - no actual exhaust testing. Since I live in Georgia, I doubt that anyone in the state testing program known anything! Georgia just eliminated the state tax credit for electric cars, and in addition slapped on a new $200 per year tax on electric cars. Georgia state gov't rarely misses a chance to do the wrong thing!

Fortunately, the Volt is considered a hybrid for Georgia state tax purposes. I burn about 10 gallons of gas a year, so I'm sort of sticking it to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'd try just driving to the testing station in Hold. But really, I'd like someone in the program to explain why an emissions program doesn't account for cars like the Volt and why they're actually making the car burn more gas just to test them.
No Hold Mode on the 2012 Volt. I live in Georgia, so state gov't does not understand the Volt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
MY QUESTION: How many consecutive gas miles do you typically drive in order to get the engine specs suitable for passing the emissions test?
I recall a thread a few years back in which WOT posted that once the OBDC emissions data has been set it should stay that way unless the 12v battery fails or is temporarily disconnected for some reason. If that happens, the engine has to be run until hot several consecutive times in order to reset the emissions data. If my recollections are accurate and if you eventually passed last year and if the 12v battery has maintained voltage you should be good to go. To be sure, find and check out that prior thread. I believe the OP was posting about a problem in NH. Hope this helps. Let us know how you make out.

KNS

EDIT: See this post for the conditions necessary to set the emissions ready flags http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?71105-My-Volt-Failed-State-Inspection-Not-Enough-Gas-Used.&p=2440321#post2440321
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I recall a thread a few years back in which WOT posted that once the OBDC emissions data has been set it should stay that way unless the 12v battery fails or is temporarily disconnected for some reason. If that happens, the engine has to be run until hot several consecutive times in order to reset the emissions data. If my recollections are accurate and if you eventually passed last year and if the 12v battery has maintained voltage you should be good to go. To be sure, find and check out that prior thread. I believe the OP was posting about a problem in NH. Hope this helps. Let us know how you make out.

KNS

EDIT: See this post for the conditions necessary to set the emissions ready flags http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?71105-My-Volt-Failed-State-Inspection-Not-Enough-Gas-Used.&p=2440321#post2440321
Thanks for the link! I'll give it a try and let you know the results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Thanks for the link! I'll give it a try and let you know the results.
According to several earlier posts in the thread to which I linked, if you eventually passed last year and the 12v supply has not been interrupted, the emissions ready flags should still be set so you shouldn't have to burn any gas to reset them. If you want to be sure, just show up for testing with a hot engine.

KNS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
According to several earlier posts in the thread to which I linked, if you eventually passed last year and the 12v supply has not been interrupted, the emissions ready flags should still be set so you shouldn't have to burn any gas to reset them. If you want to be sure, just show up for testing with a hot engine.

KNS
Great suggestion. My Volt 12v battery supply was not interrupted. I'll just run a dozen consecutive gas miles and take my car (with hot ICE) to the emissions test. (The prior year's failed test was done with cold ICE, and the prior year's passed test was done with hot ICE.)

If my Volt fails the first emissions test this year, I'll just continue on gas for another dozen or so miles and retest. There is no charge in Georgia for the retest, as long as it is at the same emissions testing station.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,396 Posts
I still have on incomplete test (O2 sensor) and I've driven 4x drives (with 2h/150km on engine each) in July alone.

If you don't already have one, you can get a cheap bluetooth OBD dongle and check the status on your phone at your convenience, and only bring it in when all the lights say 'ready' (or whichever ones need to say 'ready' to pass - some areas allow 1-2 to be in not ready state and still pass)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Good news! :D

My 2012 Volt passed the emissions test.

It turns out that the initial test failure a year ago (the first year my Volt had to do the test) was probably due to some fault codes present in the ECU.

On July 27 2015 I got the "Service high voltage charging system" message. I took my Volt to the dealer on July 28, and the dealer promptly fixed the problem with a software update, done in consultation with GM engineers. I saved the codes using my Torque Pro OBD Android app, recorded the incident in my paper logbook, and then promptly forgot about it. Two weeks later, I took my Volt in for the emissions test, and failed the test. I think now that it was due to lingering codes left in the Volt ECU from the charging system problem.

Anyhow, the 100 gasoline miles that I accumulated before the retest a year ago were probably unnecessary - at least, not the full 100 miles.

For this year's test, I depleted the battery and ran about 6.5 miles on gasoline the day before the test. On the day of the test, I ran about another 7 miles on gasoline, and then passed the test with no problem. It may not have been necessary to run any gasoline miles at all. I'll give that a try next year.

Still loving my Volt!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Good news! :D

My 2012 Volt passed the emissions test.

It turns out that the initial test failure a year ago (the first year my Volt had to do the test) was probably due to some fault codes present in the ECU.

On July 27 2015 I got the "Service high voltage charging system" message. I took my Volt to the dealer on July 28, and the dealer promptly fixed the problem with a software update, done in consultation with GM engineers. I saved the codes using my Torque Pro OBD Android app, recorded the incident in my paper logbook, and then promptly forgot about it. Two weeks later, I took my Volt in for the emissions test, and failed the test. I think now that it was due to lingering codes left in the Volt ECU from the charging system problem.

Anyhow, the 100 gasoline miles that I accumulated before the retest a year ago were probably unnecessary - at least, not the full 100 miles.

For this year's test, I depleted the battery and ran about 6.5 miles on gasoline the day before the test. On the day of the test, I ran about another 7 miles on gasoline, and then passed the test with no problem. It may not have been necessary to run any gasoline miles at all. I'll give that a try next year.

Still loving my Volt!
Your emissions testing program sounds a lot like what we have in Nevada. Be glad for it, it's very convenient and easy on drivers of newer vehicles. :)

For future reference, before going in for your OBDII test, stop by whatever auto parts store you prefer and ask them to check your car for OBD-II readiness with their scan tool. Even the cheapest ones are usually able to indicate which OBD monitors, if any, are still unset. They're inexpensive and worth having, so don't feel bad about spring for a basic one. I have one I got for $25 that uses a couple of LED lights to indicate OBD readiness. In Nevada, you can have one unset monitor and still pass provided you have no active MIL codes. YMMV of course in other states. If you have more unset monitors than you are allowed (which is the only reason you would fail without an active MIL) you can usually research the drive cycle to figure out what conditions cause the monitor to decide its conditions have been met, and drive the car accordingly.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top