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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Good evening,

I know the question in my headline is way more complex to answer than how I posed it...

I have recently changed jobs and have gone from driving chevy Impalas for years, company cars, to having to go to a car allowance and pay for everything out of my allowance.

I have been considering Volt and Prius for my next purchase because I will drive approximately 2800 to 300 per month and my current ride a 2006 Subaru outback is killing me on gas. I have narrowed my search down to the volt for sure as of last weekend, having finally test driven one.

I have my eye one a good deal for a volt base model 2015 and have test driven it and it was awesome.

After some research on here I considering paying little more for a used 2016 Generation 2 volt, most likely an LT model.

Is there huge difference between the Generation 1 versus the Generation 2 volt?

Can some one advise me or sell me either way on my considerations? Let me know if you need more information from me.
 

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The big deal with the Gen 2 is a bigger battery and more range. It also has faster acceleration, especially 0-30 mph. And available adaptive cruise control. I also appreciate that the headlights work well without needing to be upgraded by the owner. The MPG when running on gas is surprisingly good, and it burns regular instead of premium. For your situation, that may be especially important because you will probably be driving a lot on gas.

I personally am a fan of the Gen 1. I find the seat more comfortable (personal preference only). And of course you can generally get them cheaper.
 

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I was considering a new 2018 (no 2016's around here) but I ended up with 2013 for less than half the price. I had back to back driven a Gen1 then a loaded Gen2 and concluded the Gen2 was better in most every way. Considerations: I like the exterior of Gen1 more than the Gen 2 although the Gen2 looked better in the flesh than its pictures. Most of the "extra stuff of the Gen2 was "toys" that I didn't really need or would use. Although backup camera, and pedestrian sensors would be handy, no substitute for actually looking and being aware of surroundings (don't get lazy in your driving). Wouldn't use ACC, if traffic is busy (only occasionally) I don't use CC. I don't like lane nudging as on twisty roads I take the "racing line". I pay attention on straight roads so I don't wander. According to consensus the Gen1 is better built than Gen2 (?) (are we arguing how many angels can dance on the head of a pin here?). My cell phone is pay as you go and not used much (used for emergencies and to notify when where to meet etc. I'm not tied to it, don't answer while I'm driving, if it's important I will pull over, park and call back.) There is lots of things I can buy with the $18 to $20 thousand I saved. In a few years they would both be "used cars", I have usually kept my cars two to three decades so having a new car isn't a big deal to me (the years of my cars are 2013, 1988, 1980, 1979, 1978, 1976). Other people have different priorities, depends what yours are.
 

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I have my eye one a good deal for a volt base model 2015 and have test driven it and it was awesome.

After some research on here I considering paying little more for a used 2016 Generation 2 volt, most likely an LT model.
A bird in the hand.......?

It depends on how you set priorities. Sounds like mileage is number one. Weigh the fuel savings against the higher price of the two in the bush.

2015 MPGe - 98
premium gas MPG - 37

2016 MPGe - 106
regular gas MPG - 42

Here's a good tool for looking up gas mileage: https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bymodel/2016_Chevrolet_Volt.shtml
 

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Probably the most important questions for you -- do you have charging at work? What is your daily commute? If you can plug in a lot and get opportunity charging, the differences in EV range (38 rated for Gen 1, 53 for Gen 2) may/may not mean a big difference.

Also, you'll need to assess your driving conditions. Highway miles kill EV range in both generations, so you'll have to plan on getting less than you expect or planning different routes to your destination.

This will make a big difference in terms of value. Sometimes a brand new Gen 2 LT--after state/federal tax credits--gets darn close to what many dealers are asking on a used Gen 1, especially a 2015. Make sure you do your homework on that.

I have owned both generations and while I personally liked Gen 1 better, many of my reasons are subjective. You should absolutely make sure you drive a Gen 2 before making a decision. Gen 2 will hands down get you higher MPG, especially if you're like me and burn a little gas everyday because of your commute. In my Gen 1, I had a 100 MPG lifetime and in my Gen 2 I am now at 133 MPG lifetime with similar driving. However, once we're talking differences in MPG in the 100+ range, the actual differences are miniscule in terms of actual cost.

With that said, I like the Gen 1 Volt's operation on gas in extended range mode better. Some will feel differently, so you should make sure you try both vehicles in "HOLD" mode for quite a few miles before making a decision. In my opinion, the Gen 2 is rougher on gas but apparently there is a software update now that may help. The Gen 1 ICE is absolutely louder, though. In terms of gas MPG, my Gen 1 got similar cold weather MPG to the Gen 2, but the Gen 2 in warm weather on ICE blows the Gen 1 away. Gen 2 also takes regular, if that matters. I haven't found the cost difference to be significant when my MPG is 100+.

You'll also want to consider the interior issues, such as the MyLink system, NAV, whether you use Android Auto or Apple CarPlay (not available in Gen 1). Also, I would consider the warranty issues and what's left on the 2015 vs. a brand new car.

In reality, you can't go wrong with either generation just make sure you have your expectations in check on the pluses/minuses of each generation before making an expensive decision so you're not surprised.
 

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All the above information is correct. As someone who has owned both I can only add that there is no doubt that the gen2 is a better car but paradoxically I liked my gen1 more. Cars are both objective and subjective I guess.
 

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All the above information is correct. As someone who has owned both I can only add that there is no doubt that the gen2 is a better car but paradoxically I liked my gen1 more. Cars are both objective and subjective I guess.
Better from what perspective? Reliability is hard to compare. Confidence maybe less hard. I trust the build quality of gen 1 as I see a lot of people do.

And I like the look better. But my priorities aren't those of the OP.
 

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The gen 2 got the gen1 beat on many objective measures.......electric range, gas mileage on regular vs premium, the gen2 is more quiet, safety features, acceleration etc.

I enjoyed driving the gen1 more. It had a lighter on its feet feel on the road, the seats were more comfy for me and the styling suited my taste more ..... All subjective.
 

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Assuming you work a typical five day workweek/20 workdays per month, it sounds like you’ll be driving around 150 miles per day. If much of this is in city traffic below 50 mph you’ll likely be able to get more than the 40 miles (Gen 1) or 53 miles (Gen 2) but either way you’ll likely be burning some gas. Gen 1 requires premium, Gen 2 takes regular, so figure that in.

If you have opportunities for free charging during the day, you’ll want the fastest recharge rate possible - I say this only because per news reports, the 2019 Volt will recharge in about half the time.

Have you considered the Bolt?
 

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Assuming you work a typical five day workweek/20 workdays per month, it sounds like you’ll be driving around 150 miles per day.
With his high end number I came up with 93 miles/day.

Probably the most important questions for you -- do you have charging at work?
This car isn't parked in a lot during the day. Company car/car allowances are for people who travel to various customers. A claims adjuster for an insurance company, for example.
 

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They're both good choices, but we need a lot more information to answer accurately. Lots have already been covered, but one question is whether you're submitting your fuel expenses for reimbursement as opposed to tracking mileage and getting reimbursed IRS or some other set rate. If submitting fuel expenses, Prius might be a better choice, or make sure to talk to your employer about how this would work. If you plan to charge at home, it will be difficult to figure out exactly how much you're paying for electricity, and your accounting department (and possibly clients) may have some issues with it.

If you're doing IRS mileage-based reimbursement, get a Volt.

As to the actual purchase, are your monthly payments covered up to a certain threshold? Does the employer take out the loan? Will you have to give them the tax credit? Is the Volt below that threshold? Long story short, if you will be covered for payments, the Volt is a far nicer drive than a Prius and for most people who can charge even somewhat frequntly, a much cheaper car to operate.

On Gen 1 v. Gen 2, the deciding factors are price and range. Can't even begin to answer the question without knowing your typical commute and charging opportunities.
 

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I'd vote for Gen 1 - due to the high mileage requirement.

Gen 1s cost a lot less then Gen 2s - and if you are going to put a lot of miles on the car, depreciation is likely going to be a larger expense than gas.

I would get a fairly loaded Gen 1. Backup camera, Nav and leather were the key criteria for looking at mine.

It's rumored that the Gen 1s are built to a higher standard as GM didn't know the potential failure points and overbuilt it.

Don't be afraid to use the gas engine. If you do put a lot of miles on the car, you do want a balanced lifetime gas vs electric usage. The battery has a set number of charges - exceeds most typical users for 10 years but you are likely a high mileage user. Same thing with the range extender/engine with a designed amount of usage. For high usage it's best to utize a mix of the two.
 

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Having owned both, for the Gen1 I preferred the body style (it's a more unique look). For the Gen2 I like the greater EV range, adaptive cruse control (big plus), and much better screens and controls. I drive 20k miles a year, and in your situation, finances not taken into consideration, I would go for a fully optioned Gen2, easily. You're going to be spending a lot of time in your car, so I wouldn't limit myself to a base vehicle. ACC makes a big difference when driving on the highway, and I use it daily. If the Bolt had ACC I'd throw this model in the decision mix also.

PS - On my Gen2 I get 41 mpg in gas only mileage on the highway. This is with cruise control set at 70 for entirety of the gas miles driven. I do use premium gas as I've found the engine runs noticeably smoother with it, even though it's not necessary.
 

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We had a 2014 Volt Premier, and traded it in July 2016 for our current 2016 Volt Premier. We now have 42,000+ miles on the 16 Volt about the same we had on the 14 Volt when we traded it in for the 16 Volt.

MPG on reg. gas far exceed what we ever obtained on the Volt 14. The Volt 14 highest in optimum conditions was mid 40's mpg. Our 16 Volt had broken the 60 mpg figure just on gas under the same conditions.

Electric range in the Volt 14 max was 50 miles, with our 16 Volt we have been averaging well over 60 miles on a full charge in summer last trip yesterday on electric was over 69 miles.

The Gen 2 Volt (16-18) has it heads and tails over the Gen 1 Volt in my opinion...
 
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