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Something I haven't seen mentioned. What if people drive the Volt for months or years on end without ever using the gas stored in the tank? I would imagine they would probably recommend running the gas engine at least once a month to keep the gas engine from locking up and to keep the gasoline from turning into gel.
 

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Having read the manual on the 2017, there is Fuel Management Mode (FMM) which specifically runs the engine to deal with old fuel.
 

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Owners of the Volt do not drive for years without ever using gasoline. I carry very little gasoline in my Volt. I buy two gallons of gasoline per month. I use two gallons of gasoline per month. Furthermore, I did drive a month or two without burning gasoline. The Volt responded by scheduling a brief burn to maintain the generator range extender last week. This week, I drove on a 140-mile trip and burned-off two gallons of gasoline. I have accumulated about three additional gallons in my Volt, so it is not a total burn. However, I have never had issues with the stability of my fuel, regardless of temperature or humidity.
 

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Having read the manual on the 2017, there is Fuel Management Mode (FMM) which specifically runs the engine to deal with old fuel.
And there is an Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) that will run for a few minutes every 6 weeks to keep the engine lubricated. It will burn 0.03 gallons.
 

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I have had two maintenance modes in my 2016 volt and was wondering if I could put the car on "Hold" mode and not use electricity just use the ICE or is it running in an idle mode so that it would not be very effective.
 

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The car's computer keeps track of how often the engine is run and how old the gas is in the tank. While you are driving, the computer will run the engine automatically to keep it lubricated if the engine has been unused for more than a month or so and it will also run the engine enough to burn off fuel if the fuel gets more than about a year old. The driver doesn't have to keep track of either or take any action other than drive the car normally.

If you don't use much gas for driving, then filling just 2 or 3 gallons into the tank helps keep it refreshed more often than if you fill the tank to the top.
 

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I would also assume that you should get a small bump in electric range if you also do not carry as much fuel in the tank --- gas does add some weight (6.183 lbs/gallon ... full tank (8.8 gal) = 54.4lbs). I'm still on my first tank from the dealer and when it eventually is used up (which will take awhile as I'm on electric to and from work), I'll probably only put 2 gallons in the tank unless I think I'm going to make a Vegas run!
 

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And there is an Engine Maintenance Mode (EMM) that will run for a few minutes every 6 weeks to keep the engine lubricated. It will burn 0.03 gallons.
Minimum 0.03 gal (0.11L). It can be 2-3x that if it's cold outside, if you're driving or not, cabin heat use, and other variables.
But your display in gallons may not be precise enough to notice the real amount used, not sure. Even in L it's quite far off.
It's either 0.13L or 0.26L (or higher increments). But you can get the real number from current fuel economy * mileage driven on the display
 

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We had to make a run to Portland Oregon. Needed gas and filled up with a 5 gallon can of gas we had in the garage. Our 2014 Volt ran fine. What I thought was premium gas was actually 87 octane gas that was 4-6 months old. No issues. Still got nearly 40 mpg just on gas and that was in early spring as well....
 

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New to the Volt and have some opinions on fuel storage and usage. First, I am not opposed to the use some gasoline if it is good for the engine. In my current situation, the Volt is using gasoline by nature of the length of the trips it is being used for. However, when the car travels to Florida for its permanent residency, there will be little or no need for the IC to be used. Part of the problem is stale fuel, and the other relates to maintenance of the engine itself. I also own/drive bi-fuel CNG vehicles which see very little, if any, use of the stored gasoline in the fuel tank. In those vehicles (and the Volt) I make sure I use non-ethanol gasoline in the tank. It is available in many states as a recreational fuel (boats, ATV's, snowmobiles, etc.) as ethanol fuel is a disaster for 2 cycle engines and for marine use in general. Phase separation of the gasoline and alcohol during off season storage and the affinity of alcohol for water is a problem in marine use. Non-ethanol fuel can be stored for an extended period of time by adding a stabilizer (like STA-Bil) to the tank. When I am done using gasoline on a regular basis, I will run the car low on fuel and replace the fuel in the tank with non-ethanol fuel. A full tank is better as condensation can be a problem in a partially filled tank in some locations (humid, temperature swings near the dew point, etc.) so you should balance that concern against carrying the extra weight of the fuel. Beyond the fuel itself, as one of the prior posters mentioned, there is the maintenance of the engine. It needs to be run IMO on a monthly basis just long enough to get it to operating temperature. This helps boil out any moisture that has accumulated in the oil, lubricates the internal components of the engine and coats the cylinder walls with oil. It also burns the limited amount of fuel in the lines, filters and injectors and replaces it with fuel from the tank. If you have ever owned a standby device such as a home backup generator, then you know how important it is to exercise it from time to time to make sure it will work when needed. Same goes for the engine in the Volt.
 

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New to the Volt and have some opinions on fuel storage and usage. First, I am not opposed to the use some gasoline if it is good for the engine. In my current situation, the Volt is using gasoline by nature of the length of the trips it is being used for. However, when the car travels to Florida for its permanent residency, there will be little or no need for the IC to be used. Part of the problem is stale fuel, and the other relates to maintenance of the engine itself. I also own/drive bi-fuel CNG vehicles which see very little, if any, use of the stored gasoline in the fuel tank. In those vehicles (and the Volt) I make sure I use non-ethanol gasoline in the tank. It is available in many states as a recreational fuel (boats, ATV's, snowmobiles, etc.) as ethanol fuel is a disaster for 2 cycle engines and for marine use in general. Phase separation of the gasoline and alcohol during off season storage and the affinity of alcohol for water is a problem in marine use. Non-ethanol fuel can be stored for an extended period of time by adding a stabilizer (like STA-Bil) to the tank. When I am done using gasoline on a regular basis, I will run the car low on fuel and replace the fuel in the tank with non-ethanol fuel. A full tank is better as condensation can be a problem in a partially filled tank in some locations (humid, temperature swings near the dew point, etc.) so you should balance that concern against carrying the extra weight of the fuel. Beyond the fuel itself, as one of the prior posters mentioned, there is the maintenance of the engine. It needs to be run IMO on a monthly basis just long enough to get it to operating temperature. This helps boil out any moisture that has accumulated in the oil, lubricates the internal components of the engine and coats the cylinder walls with oil. It also burns the limited amount of fuel in the lines, filters and injectors and replaces it with fuel from the tank. If you have ever owned a standby device such as a home backup generator, then you know how important it is to exercise it from time to time to make sure it will work when needed. Same goes for the engine in the Volt.
People avoid the use of ethanol-mix in marine engines because so many of them are build with parts (seals, gaskets, fuel lines, etc) that aren't stable with ethanol, because the marine engines were built 40-60 years ago and never updated. That's not the case with your Volt.

Your Volt will do Volt things to maintain fuel. The gas tank is pressurized and sealed rather than vented. If you haven't otherwise used the Charge Sustaining engine, it'll run the engine every six weeks (Engine Maintenance Mode) fast but lightly for 5-15 minutes to make sure everything gets all the fluids circulated, parts get lubricated, proper temperatures are reached. It'll start chewing through fuel if the average age gets old enough (Fuel Maintenance Mode). If you use the recommended Top Tier gasoline, all the appropriate stabilizers, anti-corrosion additives, detergents, etc are already in the fuel and you won't need to add anything. The only thing you may want/need to pay attention to is that if you REALLY don't end up using much gas at all, leave only about three gallons (~100-150 miles on the meter) in the tank and if it gets old enough to start the "Fuel Maintenance Mode", put two gallons in to stop it.
 

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I do understand all the things that member hellsop mentioned in the reply to my comments. Of course the volt can tolerate ethanol and is designed to do it. However, there are other things IMO that make it smarter to use non-ethanol fuel in an environment where the fuel is not going to be consumed at a normal rate. Yes, condensation is a primary problem in a marine environment with vented tanks. Yes, the Volt fuel system is "sealed" to prevent VOC's from escaping when not in operation. However, if you are using fuel, something must replace the volume of the fuel leaving the tank and that is outside air. You cannot run a high vacuum in the tank and expect the engine to receive fuel. Phase separation can occur regardless of safeguards in place by the engine maintenance mode. Even though the Volt uses standard E10 fuel, it is not certified for E85 so there are parts of the fuel system that are subject to damage by ethanol in higher concentrations found in either E10 or possibly E15 fuel. My only point is how I feel about "stale" gasoline and what I would do. As you can guess, I am not a big fan of Ethanol fuel. I am also not a fan gasoline in general as a transportation fuel. That's why I own and drive alternative fueled vehicles such as BEV',s CNG and a PHEV like the Volt. If it is not going to be used except in limited events why use a "possibly" environmentally correct fuel when there is a possible better alternative out there.

Again, these things are only my opinion. I have no axe to grind and I think doing nothing except let the Volt do its thing as far as the maintenance mode is concerned for stale fuel should work for almost everyone. The thread was about stale fuel and my response was about what has worked for me in vehicles that are either stored for long periods or have fuel remaining in their tanks that has very limited turnover. I've had some really bad experiences with ethanol fuels when introduced into the marine industry from engine failures to major fuel system components and fuel tank failures. Newer vehicles can tolerate it better but I still like the option to avoid it when appropriate.
 
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