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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
#1 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV at 112 MPG. #2 2012 Nissan Leaf at 99 MPG, #3 2012 Azure Dynamics Transit Connect Van at 62 MPG #4 the 2012 Chevrolet Volt *Ranked by combined gas/electricity rating of 60 MPGe

http://fueleconomy.gov/feg/topten.jsp

Are you getting more than 62 MPG in your Volt?

Let them know! You can provide the mileage for your Volt here:
https://www.fueleconomy.gov/mpg/MPG.do
 

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Where the hell did they get 62?!

I am sitting at 192 and I know that is low compared to many on this site.

What a joke.

Dan
 

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Obviously they're using MPGe for BEVs and MPGe and MPG for hybrids. Why anyone cares about MPGe is beyond me. As they say "Electric when you want it, gas when you need it."
 

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When will people abandoned this whole MPG thing and start talking about cost per mile? That is really the only stat that is really relevant with this car and puts it on an even playing field when comparing it with other cars. Clearly we have a long way to go to educating the public about this car.

Dan
 

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Where the hell did they get 62?!
I am sitting at 192 and I know that is low compared to many on this site.
They are using MPGe and calculating kw-hr as 33.7 kw-hr = 1 gallon of gas.
If someone goes 650 miles on electricity, and 350 miles on gas, using EPA combined figures, they use 6.91 "electric gallons" and 9.46 gas gallons, so 1000/16.37 = 61 MPGe. I think GM says their OnStar figures show people doing roughly 2/3 electric on average, so that's slightly low, but not that far off, if people are on average getting EPA range on both electric & gas. Fleet MPGe on the self-selected voltstats.net group is currently at 63, although that's using EPA kw-hr/100 figures since Onstar doesn't let him read kw-hr consumption figures; we don't know if people as a whole are beating EPA or not. I am (110 mpge vs. 94 mpge electric, 102 overall combined), but someone on the bottom end could easily be canceling me out.

192 is kind of a bogus number since it doesn't account for electricity usage at all. Do you track your electric consumption?

MPGe is divorced from costs, so the figure is good for nationwide comparison, and it just so happens that with current average gas & electric prices it works out to be an OK ballpark figure to compare vs. gas car for fuel costs. If you have substantially cheaper or more expensive electric rates than the 11-12 cent national average, it's far off though. For personal use it's of course better to estimate your own %EV driving and calculate everything from the kw-hr, gas usage, and prices in your area.
 

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When will people abandoned this whole MPG thing and start talking about cost per mile? That is really the only stat that is really relevant with this car and puts it on an even playing field when comparing it with other cars. Clearly we have a long way to go to educating the public about this car.

Dan
Uh, how you gonna do that since the price of fuel comodities is always changing???

MPGe ties the cost of electricity to the cost of gasoline by an equivalency. That way you get electric and gas cars on a common denominator.

Don't go confusing the public any more than they already are by changing the cost per mile for any car on a daily basis depending on the pump prices at their local gas station or their electric rates depending on the time of day, etc.
 

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MPGe ties the cost of electricity to the cost of gasoline by an equivalency. That way you get electric and gas cars on a common denominator.
I'm not sure if this is what you meant or not, but just wanted to clarify that MPGe is based on the amount of energy and not cost.
 

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Uh, how you gonna do that since the price of fuel comodities is always changing???

MPGe ties the cost of electricity to the cost of gasoline by an equivalency. That way you get electric and gas cars on a common denominator.

Don't go confusing the public any more than they already are by changing the cost per mile for any car on a daily basis depending on the pump prices at their local gas station or their electric rates depending on the time of day, etc.
OK, agreed...somewhat.
The price of gas will always fluctuate, but at least it is always the same at any one time, in any one place for everyone. The problem is that useage will dramatically effect the MPGe on cars like the Volt when it doesn't effect ICE cars much at all.

Dan
 

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Of all the electric vehicles on sale, the ONLY one I can buy now here in Puerto Rico (If I had the money) is the Azure Dynamics Transit Connect Electric (number 3 in the list). A local Ford dealer (one of the largest) offers the TCE for $60,000 plus extra charges (monetary). I have seen a few Transit Connects here, but not the EV version.

It received a positive review in our local paper last week.
 

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Well, I'm at 552 miles per gallon or 0.4 litres per 100 km. I haven't taken any road trips yet. My friends and family can't wrap their heads around it. The ones that "get it", want one.

As for electricity costs...it costs me 80 cents to travel 60 miles when I charge at off-peak rates (which is easily 90% of the time).

The 400 dollars per month I was spending on gas can now go to other things and is not polluting our planet, not making the petroleum corporations richer than they already are, and not flowing to the middle east. Nope, I fuel up on the grid and that money supports local jobs and further development of Ontario's clean energy grid that does not use any coal fired power plants.

I am well aware that once I take a road trip, these numbers will change...but at least I CAN take a road trip to wherever the road leads.

No longer a slave to gas.

Figaro
 
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