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Discussion Starter #1
https://www.fplmaps.com/

The eye of the storm is still near Cuba and things are going poorly in a few counties. Miami-Dade already has over 100K without power.

After watching hours of Texas rescue work I'm more than ever sure that full EVs are not ready for prime time. Fortunately the Volt is. Rescue teams don't have to wait for power to be restored. They bring their fuel with them and more can be trucked in much faster than power can be restored. That and refueling takes minutes - not hours. There's no way those rescues could have had the immediate effect they had without gasoline, diesel and aircraft fuel.

The Houston map looks okay for many areas, but a few are still pretty bad.

http://gis.centerpointenergy.com/outagetracker/?WT.ac=OC_Image_Callout

Further south:

http://outagemap.aeptexas.com.s3.amazonaws.com/external/default.html
 

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FPL officials are talking about having to rebuild entire power systems. They have arrays of power poles lined up, along with service trucks from many states on stand-by. It's not going to be as simple as re-hanging some wires. I wonder about other equipment they'll need, like transformers and such.
 

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FPL officials are talking about having to rebuild entire power systems. They have arrays of power poles lined up, along with service trucks from many states on stand-by. It's not going to be as simple as re-hanging some wires. I wonder about other equipment they'll need, like transformers and such.
Florida will have damage worse than the Northeast Ice Storm of 1998, but at least they won't freeze...:rolleyes:

Many people lost their electrical service for at least part of the storm and, as the temperatures continued to plunge (e.g. minimum temperatures recorded at Burlington, Vermont, ranged from -7°C on 4 January to -12°C on the 12th), families and retirement home citizens alike were forced to seek respite in a shelter. There the effects of several days and nights in cramped living quarters would take their toll in the form of physical exhaustion, depression and mood variations. Particularly hard-hit were elderly people who were dependent on medication and in need of special care during their sojourn in the shelters. Across the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, the shelters numbered 362 and 85 respectively
(Harris 1998a).

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1002/j.1477-8696.2000.tb04012.x/asset/j.1477-8696.2000.tb04012.x.pdf?v=1&t=j7eb7owo&f1bf91f4&systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+unavailable+on+Saturday+and+Sunday+i.e+16th+and+17th+September+at+3:00+EDT+/+8:00+BST+/+12:30+IST+/+15:00+SGT+for+5+hours+and+3hours+for+essential+maintenance.+Apologies+for+any+inconvenience+caused+.
 

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Having both gas and electric options with the Volt is nice after Harvey. We only lost power for a couple of hours, but gas has gone up 40-50 cents a gallon since Harvey hit here in Houston. I also bought a 1500 watt inverter to use the Volt as a generator in case I lost power after Harvey. My Escape Hybrid has one built in, but only 150 watts.
 

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Our electric distribution grid has been in need of updating for decades. Hopefully, we use these situations to rebuild smart.
 

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Our electric distribution grid has been in need of updating for decades. Hopefully, we use these situations to rebuild smart.
Your hope is a good one, but I think it won't happen. Planning for updating needs to happen and equipment and parts have to be identified and sourced. I doubt that any of that has taken place.

What in all likelihood will happen is a rush to restore power as quickly as possible with existing equipment.
 

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Prayers go to HenryFL and all the other forum members in Florida who are seemingly all affected by Irma. I cannot fathom the hit to everybody's pocketbooks as businesses will struggle to reopen, people will be dealing with food, shelter, utilities, and transportation to the point that they can't also be working their daytime jobs to earn their pay. No amount of emergency fund seems to be big enough for this.

My daughter in Atlanta is hunkered down in her apartment with sandbags around her patio door, an ample supply of food and fluids and all the batteries in devices charged up waiting for the tropical storm to pass. Her biggest problem would seem to be finding small pockets of time where the wind slows to let the dog out.
 

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Wow, much of the FPL power tracker have no reports at all up the west coast. It's fair to believe these areas are hardest hit and can't report in.

Miami-Dade went from over 100K to over 800K customers down since yesterday. I keep hearing all sorts of numbers on Florida totals, the most conservative of which are 3.5 million down and the highest being 7 million.
 

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Wow, much of the FPL power tracker have no reports at all up the west coast. It's fair to believe these areas are hardest hit and can't report in.

Miami-Dade went from over 100K to over 800K customers down since yesterday. I keep hearing all sorts of numbers on Florida totals, the most conservative of which are 3.5 million down and the highest being 7 million.
I'll bet those power tracker reports depend on meters which talk through the power grid to the mother ship, but if some of the mother ship is damaged, they cannot collect that data.

I'm watching power outages spread throughout Atlanta. My daughter lost power mid afternoon. Storm is intensifying and winds are climbing.
 

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Prayers go to HenryFL and all the other forum members in Florida who are seemingly all affected by Irma. I cannot fathom the hit to everybody's pocketbooks as businesses will struggle to reopen, people will be dealing with food, shelter, utilities, and transportation to the point that they can't also be working their daytime jobs to earn their pay. No amount of emergency fund seems to be big enough for this.

My daughter in Atlanta is hunkered down in her apartment with sandbags around her patio door, an ample supply of food and fluids and all the batteries in devices charged up waiting for the tropical storm to pass. Her biggest problem would seem to be finding small pockets of time where the wind slows to let the dog out.
Hurricane Irma will create combined insured losses of $20 billion to $65 billion, according to a projection from risk modeling software company AIR Worldwide.

Amid widespread disaster preparations, analysts expect that the government will bear the brunt of these losses, with $2 billion to $4 billion expected to fall to private insurance companies.

Although the final costs of Hurricane Harvey are still being tallied, the more powerful Irma has brought Florida to a standstill and is likely to pack a financial wallop along with its human toll.
 

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Agricultural officials suggested more than $1 billion worth of crops could be lost by the time the storm ends.

Florida is among the top growers of fresh tomatoes, oranges, green beans, cucumbers, squash, and sugar cane. AIR Worldwide estimates insured losses in the United States will be at least $15 billion from Irma.
 
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