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2 page article on Ford's plan for greener products:

Link

I snipped out the meat of the article:

In the near term, Ford will begin to roll out its EcoBoost range of four and six-cylinder engines. The adoption of gasoline direct injection and turbocharging improves fuel economy by 20 per cent or more while dropping CO2 emissions by 20 per cent without diminishing overall performance.

For example, Ford's 3.5-litre EcoBoost V6 brings much better torque over a broader range.

As used in the 2009 Lincoln MKX, it promises 340-plus pound-feet of torque between 2,000 and 5,000 rpm. This compares with the 270 to 310 lb-ft developed by a naturally aspirated 4.6L V8 over the same speed range.

Another key step is to roll out more six-speed transmissions and increase the use of electric power steering as both measures improve fuel economy while reducing emissions.

Next year, Ford will roll out an updated Escape Hybrid with a new 2.5L Atkinson-cycle engine in place of the current 2.3L four and will add a hybrid version of the Fusion.

In the mid-term (as early as 2012), Ford will introduce a plug-in version of the Escape Hybrid. Replacing the current 330-volt nickel-metal-hydride battery with a lithium-ion pack and then charging it from the power grid allows the SUV's first 64 kilometres to be driven using electric power alone. On a typical drive -- most daily commutes are less than 64 km -- the environmental impact would be massive.

For the long term, Ford is betting on the fuel cell. At present, the company has 30 Focus FCVs (fuel cell vehicles) in operation in North America, five of which are running around the Vancouver area. In all, these test mules have amassed more than 1.2 million test kilometres without significant problems. In fact, Franette says the fuel cells have been very reliable, with only one being replaced to date.
It seems Ford is at least 2 years behind GM in offering an E-REV type vehicle, but after 2012, they seem to be following the same strategy as GM - create an E-REV platform, then eventually substitute a fuel cell in for the ICE range extender. If immitation is the highest form of flattery, then Ford has high praise for GM's product plan.
 

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Interesting find. And you are right, this is almost identical to GM's plan. Although the Escape is an SUV version of the E-REV. Ironically 64 KM is almost exactly 40 miles. They may be a day late and a dollar short if GM's plans take off. Somehow I doubt Ford is investing the capital that GM is.

I will say however, that Ford has been testing numerous plug-in versions of the Escape with power companies. They seem to be performing well, but they aren't E-REVs.
 

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If true I'm truly disappointed in Ford. However, based on the hybrid comment I'm confident they are just tossing up a smokescreen. They need to keep the funds rolling in and also make other companies keep on the research. Now, when are they going to introduce their secret project? Ford? We're waiting. We know you're not going to let GM get a 2 year head start. The gag is up.
 

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In the mid-term (as early as 2012), Ford will introduce a plug-in version of the Escape Hybrid. Replacing the current 330-volt nickel-metal-hydride battery with a lithium-ion pack and then charging it from the power grid allows the SUV's first 64 kilometres to be driven using electric power alone. On a typical drive -- most daily commutes are less than 64 km -- the environmental impact would be massive.
This Escape hybrid is very doable and does not take a lot of engineering to accomplish. Our local electric coop had one of their Ford Escapes converted to a plug-in hybrid by installing litium ion batteries and changing the computer programming. The work was done by a company in Colorado at a cost of $10,000 for the hand made conversion. Ford should be able to do much better price wise once they put it on an assembly line. As for the 64KM range. On the road experience with town driving of the coops Escape is showing almost exactly those numbers if not somewhat better. I'd say that if Ford was really serious, they could have this modified Escape at dealerships next year. 2012 seems like a really lazy schedule for introduction of a vehicle that requires almost zero in new engineering.
 

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I don't know for certain about the Escape but one of the limitations of the Prius Hymotion-enhanced hybrid is that the electric end of the drivetrain isn't good for more than 30mph or so. I'd expect the Escape has a similar limitation.

Ford does not have the resources that GM does and is making a more conservative but more predictable play. Combined with their improving reputation for building stuff that works, Ford's strategy may be a good one for returning to profitability soon while being positioned for reasonable competition in 2012.

Remember, GM can't supply ALL the world's vehicle needs in 2012, there will be room for Ford to provide alternative products. RE-EVs will be a miniscule portion of the market, even if the Volt is very successful, for some years to come.

If Ford can't get profitable relatively soon, long-term investments in very highly advanced powertrains will be pointless because Ford will be gone.
 

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RE-EVs will be a miniscule portion of the market, even if the Volt is very successful, for some years to come.
Assuming the price is reasonable, I believe the REEV / E-REV will really take off. When people understand that they will get the same / better performance of a car using cheaper fuel (electricity), and using NO gas for the first 40 miles, I think sales will take off.
 
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