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$$$

Ford was trying save money on the EVSEs and got burned.
 

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Perhaps they simply used the same supplier, Lear. The newer EVSE's are from Clipper Creek.

And perhaps they did not change the car to default to 8A as GM did?
 

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The FFE was released in 2011 like the Volt and the Energi's were well into thier 2012 pre-production rollout when the GM recall occurred in the spring of 2012 so it was a little too late to "learn" by then.
 

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I read the article. Three of the fires were caused by owners using extensions (no complete details are given). I suspect that the fires are at the outlets where the EVSE plug and outlet (or extension) contacts suffer the most resistance. At 12 A, there can be several hundred watts of heat generated (P = i2*R or 144 watts per ohm), thus producing smoke, melting insulation, and possible flames. Maybe if the current was lowered to 8 A these conditions would be reduced.

Anyway, an upgraded cord with temperature sensor can reduce the possibility of a fire, but bad extensions will continue to create the same risk. BTW, the image shown is for a Ford Fusion Hybrid which does not need or use an EVSE. It should be a Ford Fusion Energi instead as mention in the article.
 

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Next up "Smart Cords" with a thermocouple in each end.

I'm not going to lie, I expected "thermal monitoring" to be a thing in electrical outlets YEARS ago but it still hasn't happened.

As EV and home charging take off, I suspect it WILL become a thing, at least for the EV outlets.
 

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Recharging any EV from a 120 volt outlet is always going to be problematic. Every manufacturer wants to claim there car can be quickly recharged, but they don't want to limit their sales to only those who have 240 volt outlets in their garages

This puts you between a rock and a hard place - 12 amps (the best you can ask of a standard 15 amp 120 volt outlet, which is what most people have) at 120 volts is only 1,440 watts and because of built in inefficiencies, you are actually putting less than 1,200 watts into the car battery and since the car holds 15 times that amount, that near max load on the outlet is present for hours upon hours, which causes things to get hot - Hotter yet if the outlet isn't new, hotter yet if the owner is plugging and unplugging it every day - They could mandate that everyone replace their tired outlet every year . . . . but few would actually listen and do that

The solution is L2 charging on 240 volts . . . . but most people don't have an outlet and many electrical contractors will charge an arm and a leg to install one, so we will continue to hear all sorts of horror stories about melted 120 volt plugs and sockets. If you're not in a hurry to recharge, stick with the 8 amp setting - You'll have far fewer problems than asking your garage outlet to provide 12 amps for several hours every day

Don
 

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I use an extension cord with my leaf blower. I have aftermarket end on an extension so I don't wear out the plug on the blower. I noticed this this extension getting so hot it was melting the plastic around the prongs. The screws had come loose on the multistrand wire. I soldered the wire into the loop to go around the tightening screw and put some Loctite on it so it wouldn't work loose. JB Welded the prongs to the melted plastic to keep them tight. Works fine now. An example of how any resistance in extension cord connectors creates heat. They've got to be tight. If they are not heat can go way up.
 

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Next up "Smart Cords" with a thermocouple in each end.

I'm not going to lie, I expected "thermal monitoring" to be a thing in electrical outlets YEARS ago but it still hasn't happened.

As EV and home charging take off, I suspect it WILL become a thing, at least for the EV outlets.
:) The best solution is a J1772 extension cable - like the JLong or ICEbreaker.

I'm as guilty as the next though. I recently built a 50' extension cord with 6-20s on each end. I used commercial quality connectors and 12 ga SJOOC cable - which should be fine. Though when I added up the cost of the cable and connectors, which I bought retail at Lowes, I was almost half way to the price of a JLong...
 

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the last time I took apart a new type Kill-a-watt there was a thermal fuse in the power link.
 

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Next up "Smart Cords" with a thermocouple in each end.

I'm not going to lie, I expected "thermal monitoring" to be a thing in electrical outlets YEARS ago but it still hasn't happened.

As EV and home charging take off, I suspect it WILL become a thing, at least for the EV outlets.
The 'real solution' should have happened years and years ago - Forget about 120 volt appliances all together and use only 240 volts, like they do in Europe. Whatever the load, the current is halved because the voltage is double.

We stayed in a little adobe villa in Spain one time which was probably 300 years old. When they 'electrified' it 50 or 60 years ago, they stapled wire to the walls up near the ceiling. There was a small water heater which was running off what looked to be speaker wire stapled to the wall

12 gauge copper is pretty standard here - In Europe, most circuits use 14 or even 16 gauge wire. Here in North America, we could probably have saved a million tons of copper if we had switched to 240 volts 150 years ago . . . .

Don
 

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The 'real solution' should have happened years and years ago - Forget about 120 volt appliances all together and use only 240 volts, like they do in Europe. Whatever the load, the current is halved because the voltage is double.

We stayed in a little adobe villa in Spain one time which was probably 300 years old. When they 'electrified' it 50 or 60 years ago, they stapled wire to the walls up near the ceiling. There was a small water heater which was running off what looked to be speaker wire stapled to the wall

12 gauge copper is pretty standard here - In Europe, most circuits use 14 or even 16 gauge wire. Here in North America, we could probably have saved a million tons of copper if we had switched to 240 volts 150 years ago . . . .

Don
True 'dat.
And we'd also be able to have decent electric tea-kettles not the water luke-warmers we have now.
 
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