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should be interesting to see how it pans out. don't have space currently in the garage and I am loathe to give up my daily driver for an EV; mostly because I have a convertible and that lifestyle choice is more important to me currently.
 

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I looked up the battery weight in the Bolt and it's 980lbs, about twice the weight of the Volt's battery but at four times the EV range. I hope they offer the same battery technology in a future Volt, it would be nice to have a hundred miles of EV range and still have the Volt's unlimited total range, that would be enough for all of my local driving (a trip into Boston for me leaves 9 miles of battery so most of the trip back is on gas, a round trip to Newton misses by about 10 miles). The Bolt's 200 mile range still limits it to local use only so it's not a Volt replacement but it's very encouraging that the battery technology has doubled the miles/lb of the Volt's.
 

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should be interesting to see how it pans out. don't have space currently in the garage and I am loathe to give up my daily driver for an EV; mostly because I have a convertible and that lifestyle choice is more important to me currently.
Maybe GM will produce a convertible Bolt EV, smilar to the Buick Casada's design. Or you can get it done with a hacksaw and a torch.

Raymond
 

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Maybe GM will produce a convertible Bolt EV, smilar to the Buick Casada's design. Or you can get it done with a hacksaw and a torch.

Raymond
What kind of sense would a drop top Bolt make? The Bolt has a limited range, 200 miles is great for a commuter car but it's useless as a touring car. A two seat drop top car based on the Volt is a much better idea. Lets look at the places a convertible makes sense and where it doesn't.

Horrible drives made even worse in an open top,

128 around Boston
Dan Ryan, Kennedy in Chicago
101 to San Francisco
Could you imagine sitting in that traffic with the top down so that you can breath all of the fumes from all of those ICE cars?

Now lets look at the delightful drives made even better with an open top.

Any back road in Vermont
US 1 along the coast of Maine
CA 1 along the coast of California (convertibles should probably be required by law for this road)

The Bolt can handle any of the horrible drives, it can't make it to the delightful drives and then come home. There is no supercharger network for Bolts and even if there were 200 miles of range means that you would have to stop every 150 miles to charge up. The Volt on the other hand can do the pleasant drives without having to stop at all. I do trips to Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island every weekend in the summer, since I got the Volt the only reason we stop is to empty or fill our human tanks, we have never had to stop to fill the Volt's tank. When batteries get 2X better then they are now, i.e. a 400 mile range, then a pure EV can be used for touring. Even a 300 mile range with an extensive supercharger network would be good enough but the only car that could do that now is a $90K Tesla and the only state that it could do it in is California.
 

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Click bait, not a single piece of new information
Well the link is a confirmation, it shows that unlike the Tesla Model 3, the GM Chevy Bolt is on schedule in the real world. If you order the base model Tesla 3, it would come sometime in 2020, 4 years later than the Chevy Bolt.
 

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A drop-top is useful for all conditions. Especially if there is a mechanical top instead of cloth.

My '70 Vette had a removable hard top as well as the cloth drop top. I drove it year round in northern Indiana.
 

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A drop-top is useful for all conditions. Especially if there is a mechanical top instead of cloth.

My '70 Vette had a removable hard top as well as the cloth drop top. I drove it year round in northern Indiana.
You misunderstand my objection to a Bolt drop top. It all comes down to range. Your Vette could go anywhere, it probably had 350 miles of range on a full tank and more importantly there are gas stations everywhere so you could always pull in an fill it up in 5 minutes. The Bolt has only 200 miles of range and no supercharging capability so it can only go a maximum fo 100 miles from home. A 200 mile range is very comfortable for local use where a typical trip is much less than that, but unless you live in Monterrey Ca it doesn't make sense to own a convertible version. Sometime in the future a Bolt like convertible will make lots of sense, i.e. if batteries get 2X better then it would have a 400 mile range, or alternatively if it had Tesla like supercharging and there were lot's and lot's of supercharger sites. In the next 5 years a Volt like roadster is the far more desirable car.
 

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A drop-top is useful for all conditions. Especially if there is a mechanical top instead of cloth.

My '70 Vette had a removable hard top as well as the cloth drop top. I drove it year round in northern Indiana.
This is what you really want,

https://www.wired.com/2016/07/electric-corvette-destroy-world-record

Chevy should seriously be thinking about something like this. Take a Corvette, put in 4 electric motors, one for each wheel, 1/2 of a Bolt battery pack (30 KVA at 500lbs, but they would have to add much more cooling), and the Volt's engine and generator. The Corvette is light, combine that with the torque of four motors, the Volt has 295 ft/lbs, double that to get 600 ft/lbs, and it will accelerate like a bat out of hell. With the Volt's engine, configured so that it keeps the batteries charged more that the Volt's 10 miles of charge on mountain mode, and it would out perform the current Corvette while buring a fraction of the gas.
 

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it probably had 350 miles of range on a full tank
It had a range of about 150mi since it was a 454 beast. And it only ran on 110 Sunoco, so, finding stations wasn't that easy. I could get to work and back a couple days and that's about it.

For a day trip, 200mi is more than enough for me. That's like 3+ hours of driving. Different strokes.. different era.

http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/reviews/a9795/1970-chevrolet-454-corvette/

edit: OK. It says 162 miles range on one tank, but, I never got over 150 even to empty. It only got 8mpg or so.
 

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The Bolt can handle any of the horrible drives, it can't make it to the delightful drives and then come home. There is no supercharger network for Bolts and even if there were 200 miles of range means that you would have to stop every 150 miles to charge up.
Um the Bolt EV will have a DC fast charge option on the CCS network. Below is an image of the CCS DC fast charge network as of July 5th (filtered for only CCS stations). and it's growing at an amazing speed. In my area Ontario is adding 214 DC fast charging stations in the next 9 months (they will all be dual CCS / CHAdeMO stations). The future is bright. While just like a Tesla the Bolt EV will not be a go everywhere anytime car. But it will likely work for a large number of people.

 

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135 miles from Monterey to SLO (both with CCS DC fast chargers) on Hwy 1. That should be very comfortable with the Bolt's 200 mile range.
 

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I hate Forbes. Not for the content (which I wouldn't have a clue), but for the initial "thought for the day" or whatever they call it. Secondly, they ban me because I use a ad blocker.
 

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The bolt is appealing to me in some ways: the whole ICE drivetrain feels frivolous in the Volt for the one weekend a month I make a 200 mile trip when a Bolt is available. With the bolt and DC fast charging at CCS's 350 limit I should be able to add about 150-180 miles of range in about 15 minutes if everything plays nice and GM actually offers the full spec.

The only issue I see is the "GM doesn't get it" part. At first DC charging seemed to be out, then they added it. How fast is the charging going to really be by GM (150kw? 350kw? maybe only 50kw?) They aren't doing super cruise or even adaptive cruise control from what I am seeing. Seems like planned obsolescence where those features might drop as nexgen leaf or Tesla comes out. The Bolt's range is somehow achieved despite its rumored .315 vs the Model 3's .21 mean it's range will drop off much faster than the 3 at faster Speeds. Given estimated frontal areas the Bolt has almost the same drag at 60mph as the 3 does at 80mph...

The 37,500 price tag vs the Tesla at 35,000. $2500 is the current cost to enable supercharging on Tesla's old Model 60s that didn't come with it. DC Fast Charging on a leaf is $1750. So if chevy's pricing is similar I've just enabled autopilot at 2500, in addition to supercharging for roughly the same price -- and I have full access to all the superchargers. In the end Tesla will charge 35000, and I am sure the retail price of the 37,500 bolt will actually be charged at some amount less. Then at later model years, charging speed will be increased and super cruise added to make it competitive.
 

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The bolt is appealing to me in some ways: the whole ICE drivetrain feels frivolous in the Volt for the one weekend a month I make a 200 mile trip when a Bolt is available. With the bolt and DC fast charging at CCS's 350 limit I should be able to add about 150-180 miles of range in about 15 minutes if everything plays nice and GM actually offers the full spec.

The only issue I see is the "GM doesn't get it" part. At first DC charging seemed to be out, then they added it. How fast is the charging going to really be by GM (150kw? 350kw? maybe only 50kw?) They aren't doing super cruise or even adaptive cruise control from what I am seeing. Seems like planned obsolescence where those features might drop as nexgen leaf or Tesla comes out. The Bolt's range is somehow achieved despite its rumored .315 vs the Model 3's .21 mean it's range will drop off much faster than the 3 at faster Speeds. Given estimated frontal areas the Bolt has almost the same drag at 60mph as the 3 does at 80mph...

The 37,500 price tag vs the Tesla at 35,000. $2500 is the current cost to enable supercharging on Tesla's old Model 60s that didn't come with it. DC Fast Charging on a leaf is $1750. So if chevy's pricing is similar I've just enabled autopilot at 2500, in addition to supercharging for roughly the same price -- and I have full access to all the superchargers. In the end Tesla will charge 35000, and I am sure the retail price of the 37,500 bolt will actually be charged at some amount less. Then at later model years, charging speed will be increased and super cruise added to make it competitive.
You forget the main point. If you order a Bolt, you will receive it in a few weeks or months. The Model 3 may not arrive in your dog's lifetime.
 
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