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Discussion Starter #1
Would that be the adaptive cruise control?

I want the feature so that if I am on the freeway and don't notice that traffic has come to a stop I want the car to automatically slam on the brakes.

I want the premier but I wonder what options I need over that.

Any help?

DD
 

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You would need to purchase a 2017 or 2018 Volt Premier

Under Packages:
Driver Confidence Package ($495)
Driver Confidence Package II ($495)

Under Safety:
Forward automatic braking (Adds adaptive cruise control for $595, requires both the Driver Confidence Package ($495), Driver Confidence Package II($495))
 

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You would need to purchase a 2017 or 2018 Volt Premier

Under Packages:
Driver Confidence Package ($495)
Driver Confidence Package II ($495)

Under Safety:
Forward automatic braking (Adds adaptive cruise control for $595, requires both the Driver Confidence Package ($495), Driver Confidence Package II($495))
Correct, that's how my 2017 was built.
 

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Even with the ACC and lane control on, you can't ignore what's going on around you unless everyone is behaving or traffic is light on the freeway. The Volt is currently only a level one autopilot but I still find it very useful and would not buy a car without it.

You'll probably be wishing for software updates. I'm not sure GM will follow Tesla's lead on frequent updates. You have to get GM software updates at the dealership, no OTA, it's the law. Tesla does not have dealerships so the law does not apply to them. GM needs to consider a new autonomous division for the electric car revolution that does not utilize dealers unless they can get some state laws changed. Electric cars are more digital than mechanical maintenance wise. Just swap out the circuit board and reload the backup software from the satellite, then reboot. If they don't, Silicon Valley companies like Apple or Google will eat them for lunch.

The Volt is a great transitional car, but in 10 years, software will dominate the driving experience. DoorDash will bring you your dinner in a driverless electric car. Will we even need to own a car? Future generations won't want to drive. They would rather spend time on their tablet. This might be what makes the world great for them. It's not going to be like your grandfather's new Oldsmobile.
 

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Is there any way to add these features onto an already purchased Volt LT? I suspect not, but figured I'd ask the experts.
 

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What you really need to know is that the Chevy auto-braking and ACC systems are not the most advanced. If you ignore traffic you WILL hit someone, and the car won't save you. The Chevy ACC does not look forward very far, so it's intervention is usually a little late. You also need to know that the ACC will not pick up a stopped vehicle. So you will keep barreling towards it until you take control. Supposedly the car will eventually try to stop somewhat, but you will still have an accident.
 

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... You also need to know that the ACC will not pick up a stopped vehicle. ...
I do not think this statement is correct (?) (However, I agree that the driver needs to stay aware and involved!)

Interesting, coming up on a previously undetected vehicle which is stopped. May be a wrong impression from using a close gap setting? I don't use it this way, however I think as soon as it "sees" the vehicle, it acts on the gap length. I think it detects a stopped vehicle in lane, am I missing something?

My ACC routinely stops in around town driving. I prefer to stop myself more gently, but ACC immediately slows and stops if the car in front slows and stops.

Now, if the car is way out in front, the VOLT does not react until it picks it up, and that result is rough at best to my taste, but as far as I know, it always does stop.

By contrast, on the highway (where I really appreciate ACC), coming up on a slower vehicle seems to work just fine and with some finesse (not rough at all).
 

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Interesting, (standby typing)

My ACC routinely stops in around town driving. I prefer to stop myself more gently, but ACC immediately slows an stops if the car in front does.

Now, if the car is way out in front, the VOLT does not react until it picks it up, and that result is rough at best to my taste.
Based on my experience with my 2017 w/ACC the statement "ACC will not pick up a stopped vehicle" is correct. The Volt's ACC system is not capable of tracking a stationary object whether fully stopped vehicle, large trash container, clothing donation box, etc.

Scenario 1: You are following a vehicle in the middle lane of three lanes of traffic using ACC. The vehicle ahead slows as you approach a traffic signal that is red with vehicles stopped ahead. At the last second the vehicle in front of you changes lanes, moving to the right lane to turn right at the intersection. The Volt's ACC absolutely will not be able to determine that one or more stopped vehicles are now directly in your path, in fact the ACC will attempt to accelerate to the ACC set speed. Yikes! You need to be alert and ready to disengage ACC and manually apply the brakes anytime you are in potential stop and go traffic.

Scenario 2: You are using ACC on a secondary road, traveling at 30 mph, and come to the crest of a hill. As you come over the hill you see a slow moving or stopped vehicle ahead. The Volt's ACC camera and radar sensors are at first pointed too high, then pointed too low, to see the vehicle that is now in your path. To avoid a panic stop and collision warning alert you need to disengage the ACC and manually apply the brakes as soon as you see the traffic that lies ahead that the Volt has not yet detected.

Scenario 3: You are using ACC on a secondary road, traveling at 30 mph, and come around a curve. As you come around the curve you see a slow moving or stopped vehicle ahead. The Volt's ACC camera and radar sensors are pointed wide of the curving road ahead and cannot see the vehicle that is now in your path. To avoid a panic stop and collision warning alert you need to disengage the ACC and manually apply the brakes as soon as you see the traffic that lies around the curve in case the Volt has not detected the vehicle.

Scenario 4: You are using ACC on a highway, traveling at 70 mph, and come to the crest of a hill or come around a curve. You are able to see 800 or so yards ahead and see that traffic is backed up ahead, has slowed to a crawl in all forward lanes. The Volt's ACC camera and radar sensors are not able to see that far ahead. To avoid a panic stop and collision warning alert, probable collision, in spite of having forward automatic braking you need to disengage the ACC, use the regen paddle if desired, and get ready manually apply the brakes as soon as you see the traffic that lies ahead has stopped or has significantly slowed. (If traffic ahead has only slowed, not fully stopped, you can drop your speed to the prevailing speed of the other vehicles and then resume ACC at the lower speed as you reach the area of traffic congestion as long as the vehicle ahead of you is not fully stopped.)
 

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Interesting, coming up on a previously undetected vehicle which is stopped. Not sure. (may be an impression with close gap setting? I don't use it this way, however I think as soon as it "sees" the vehicle, it acts on the gap length). I think it detects a stopped vehicle in lane, am I missing something?

My ACC routinely stops in around town driving. I prefer to stop myself more gently, but ACC immediately slows and stops if the car in front slows and stops.

Now, if the car is way out in front, the VOLT does not react until it picks it up, and that result is rough at best to my taste, but as far as I know, it always does stop.

By contrast, on the highway (where I really appreciate ACC), coming up on a slower vehicle seems to work just fine and with some finesse (not rough at all).
Yes, you can use it in stop and go traffic and it will work just fine if the car you've been tracking stops. But it will not newly detect a stopped car that it was not previously tracking.

Don't get me wrong. The system is nice, but rudimentary at best.
 

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I guess I do so much manual intervention, I have not noticed the previously undetected stopped vehicle case. When I go out later, I will look to see if and when the green car indicator comes on.

I totally agree there are any number of scenarios where the system does not work, and have also experienced the "yikes" acceleration with manual intervention and some disappointment that the system is not more sophisticated.
 

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I don't understand


What's so hard about using the brake if you have to?


Why do you need the car to brake for you?
 

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This "sometimes the vehicle is in charge, sometimes you need to intervene" shade of gray will be/is a problem for some. Some drivers will try to let the car do all the driving and end up in a collision or worse. It's like the doorbell ringing at a house, everyone thinks the other person will get the door. People already drive while texting, this new false sense of AV will make matters worse. Not for everyone, but certainly for some, like the Tesla guy using AutoPilot who was killed when the car drove into a truck crossing in front.

And how many will read the manual (and practice) to understand the nuances? Heck, we had a thread where someone locked themselves in their car, not realizing pulling the door handle (once to unlock, once to open) would free them from captivity.
 

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I don't understand


What's so hard about using the brake if you have to?


Why do you need the car to brake for you?
When you are driving, mostly on the highway but also on secondary roads, in any major metropolitan area, the amount of traffic on the road during most hours makes using conventional cruise control frustrating if not impossible. The speed of the other vehicles on the road is never constant, forcing you to disengage the cruise control almost as soon as you engage it. Adaptive cruise control delivers on the promise of using cruise control under normal traffic conditions. For me, having ACC makes it possible, for the first time in almost 40 years of driving DC area roads, to use cruise control the way it was intended.
 

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How could you not notice traffic has stopped?
Happens all the time, you get distracted by the navigation system or the audio system. Traffic conditions can change quickly. Also, fog can obscure the road and the traffic ahead.
 

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Happens all the time, you get distracted by the navigation system or the audio system. Traffic conditions can change quickly. Also, fog can obscure the road and the traffic ahead.
When you’re operating a motor vehicle you’re supposed to pay attention to the traffic and it’s conditions. People need to put the phones down and drive
 

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When you’re operating a motor vehicle you’re supposed to pay attention to the traffic and it’s conditions. People need to put the phones down and drive
Even without using a cell phone or smart phone while driving the modern automobile can povide so much information to the driver that they can quickly be overwhelmed.
 

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What you really need to know is that the Chevy auto-braking and ACC systems are not the most advanced. If you ignore traffic you WILL hit someone, and the car won't save you. The Chevy ACC does not look forward very far, so it's intervention is usually a little late. You also need to know that the ACC will not pick up a stopped vehicle. So you will keep barreling towards it until you take control. Supposedly the car will eventually try to stop somewhat, but you will still have an accident.
What it does:

The 6 bright red LEDs get in your face and there is an audio warning. Braking boost gets enhanced. When it hits the brakes, it's sharp and to the point of ABS pulsing. Violent would be a way to describe it.

While the Cadillac 2017 is more sophisticated (it also has rear AEB), the Volt has the advantage of the LED HUD which you should have seen many times by now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK8gVr0x6_w

Now the Tesla at a similar speed:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/video/sciencetech/video-1294914/Tesla-Model-S-autopilot-crashes-van-highway.html

There are few of these videos where the AEB fails in traffic. I have yet to see either the Volt or Cadillac fail like this. It stops.
 
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