GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently got caught in a flash flood and quickly found water coming over my hood for a couple hundred feet. The battery was not charged so I was driving with the gas engine only. The gas engine immediately shut down and the reserve battery engine kicked on so I could get to high ground.

I had the vehicle towed to a Chevrolet dealership and was told that the motor is shot because the air filter was wet and the gas engine sounded very distressed when it tried to start. The dealership seems to default to full engine replacement anytime they see that the engine has any water in it. They made no attempts at trying to get the water out of the engine to see if they could get it running.

The dealership wants $7k to replace the engine with a new one and $4k to replace it with a salvage engine. The vehicle is a 2012 with 60k miles on it and appears to be worth around $10k if fully functioning.

The dealership has charged the battery and verified that the electric engine and transmission are working properly. I am planning on going to pick up the car and attempting to get the water out of the engine somehow before I decided on an engine replacement.

I would greatly appreciate any ideas or insight on my dilemma!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,337 Posts

Bad things can happen when Volt engine is operated in a flood.
This is more than likely why the GM service dept may want to replace the ICE...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,763 Posts
Have you contacted your insurance company? If flood damage is covered under your auto policy comprehensive coverage the damaged engine might be covered, the insurance company might consider the vehicle a total loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Have you contacted your insurance company? If flood damage is covered under your auto policy comprehensive coverage the damaged engine might be covered, the insurance company might consider the vehicle a total loss.
Agreed. I'd check with the insurace co. before deciding anything.
 

·
Registered
2014 Cadillac ELR
Joined
·
633 Posts
1. Plugs out, WD40 in cylinders, injector fuses out, crank and watch what comes out of plug holes...
2. If it cranks, and stuff stops coming out of plug holes... plugs in.
3. Compression test. If good, change oil and buy a lotto ticket. If bad, figure out if bent valves, bent rods, or a mix of both (repair or replace engine. If block good, it can be rebuilt, if rods and block good, head can be replaced)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
1. Plugs out, WD40 in cylinders, injector fuses out, crank and watch what comes out of plug holes...
2. If it cranks, and stuff stops coming out of plug holes... plugs in.
3. Compression test. If good, change oil and buy a lotto ticket. If bad, figure out if bent valves, bent rods, or a mix of both (repair or replace engine. If block good, it can be rebuilt, if rods and block good, head can be replaced)
The only way that I can think of to crank the engine is to boot up and pop the hood, not sure it will even do that with the coils off and the plugs removed.
Worth a try though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
If you had it repaired with either a new or used engine, I think that months on down the road you would likely begin to have all sorts of other problems - You had many things completely submerged that were never designed to be under water. Most of them are probably more or less 'waterproof' to keep them working when splashed with water, but completely submerged is a whole other ballgame

If it was me, I *might* spend the money to get it fixed *if* I was 95% sure I could quickly sell it and come come ahead . . . . but my advice would be to just write it off, sell it as it sits for whatever you can, or part it out for whatever you can. I fear fixing it and making it reliable again may cost you way more than you think - The bill on these sort of 'projects' tends to grow when you get into them - and you might find yourself in a deep hole with no good way out

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,476 Posts
Any modern car with its electronics gets written off if it is in a flood. Problems might not be apparent now will rear their ugly head in the future. See your insurance company.
 

·
Registered
2014 Cadillac ELR
Joined
·
633 Posts
Ouch, yep, there's your problem!

Used engine? Not expensive if you DIY...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
Once I saw the oil, I knew it was toast. As others have posted, insurance will most definitely write the car off as a loss and probably wouldn't give what it is worth. Best thing is to either replace with a salvage motor or sell as-is/damaged with full disclaimer. You could probably get $5K for it as a parts car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
It took a breath of water. I would have done the same as you drain everything replace filters and take the chance if you didn't see anything broken. It couldn't compress water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
I forgot to mention that I only have liability insurance. I appreciate the comments so far. I think I might try to get the water out, change the oil and see if it will turn over. Is there a way to force the engine on without having to run a special program on it? The oil looks pretty milky.
With the ignition on, simply popping the hood open will cause the engine to start under normal circumstances. I don't know if the engine failing to start would generate trouble codes.

If you can use the car normally in electric-only mode, you might drive it around for a month or so and see what else crops up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I appreciate all of the advice on this thread! Now, an update:

I ended up finding a used motor at a Chevy-specific parts store in town and used the mechanic they recommended to replace the engine. I paid $650 for an engine with 42k miles and just over $1,000 for the engine swap. The first engine I bought failed immediately upon being installed. Thankfully, the engine came with a 6-month warranty and I was able to get another engine installed. I had to pay another $1,000 for the second swap but the car drives great now and I was able to get it back on the road for several thousand less than the dealership quoted.

After the second engine was installed, I had to take the car to the dealer to get the memory flashed on one of the charging control modules. The dealership only charged me the diagnostic fee to get this done. This still doesn't feel like a total success since the problem was self-induced and I am out a few thousand dollars but I am grateful to have my Volt back and will steer clear of flash floods from now on!
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
Glad to hear you fixed it. I like seeing stories of people still wrenching on their fancy EV's the OEMS are trying desperately to weld the hood shut with.

Next time you planning on fording a river, run it in mountain mode and get some charge before switching back to EV submersible operation. LOL.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top