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Good read by Chris Paine ("Who Killed the Electric Car?", "Charge", and "Revenge of the Electric Car": Five myths about electric cars

Synopsis of myths:
1. The electric car is dead.
2. Electric cars can’t get people where they need to go.
3. Charging is a headache.
4. Electric cars aren’t any better for the environment.
5. Most people will never be able to afford an electric car.​

As the cost of electric-car technology trends downward and the price of oil trends upward, electric cars should prove the more affordable and, based on my experience, more enjoyable choice.
Read how Paine refutes the myths:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/five-myths-about-electric-cars/2013/04/26/5c8504e0-ab77-11e2-a198-99893f10d6dd_story.html
 

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Item 4 electric cars are no better for environment. The naysayers claim electric cars use coal for fuel, this is false. Coal power plants are such that they can not be configured to instant demand, therefore power produced at night or low demand times go to waste. That is why utilities offer reduced rates at these times. The electric car charges during these times of low demand, therefore there is a zero increase in pollution. Until we are off coal and fossil fuel electric cars improve there efficiency.
 

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I am sure my pair of Volts are better for the environment as we get most of our electric off solar and not much coal is used on the remainder here as we are close to Palo Verde nuclear plant and there are several largish Nat Gas plants that I know of.
 

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Item 4 electric cars are no better for environment. The naysayers claim electric cars use coal for fuel, this is false. Coal power plants are such that they can not be configured to instant demand, therefore power produced at night or low demand times go to waste. That is why utilities offer reduced rates at these times. The electric car charges during these times of low demand, therefore there is a zero increase in pollution. Until we are off coal and fossil fuel electric cars improve there efficiency.
Ah, The Great Coal Irony: PEV critics who call EV proponents hypocrites because they claim (incorrectly) they'd all be run on coal, but who don't believe in AGW and think that generating electricity with coal is good because it's cheap.
 

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Item 3 is a "yes" and "no".

There are definitely scenarios where charging is a headache, both with public charging and at home if you don't live in a house with a garage and adequate electrical capability...

We can't just write this one off as a myth in my opinion.......
 

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Great one!
Reminded me of our great FF loving Natural Gas Governor Lepage here in Maine opposing of course renewable energy wind farm because it would "spoil the view".
 

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Washington Post 5 Myths about Electric Vehicles

From Today's Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/five-myths-about-electric-cars/2013/04/26/5c8504e0-ab77-11e2-a198-99893f10d6dd_story.html




Five myths about electric cars
By Chris Paine, Published: April 26

by Chris Paine Chris Paine is a filmmaker whose documentaries include “Who Killed the Electric Car?” ,“Charge” and “Revenge of the Electric Car.” The troubles of electric-car-maker Fisker Automotive have fueled another round of debate about whether plug-ins can live up to their promises. The California start-up, which had already halted production and laid off most of its employees, missed a federal loan paymentMonday and told a congressional hearing on Wednesday that bankruptcy may be unavoidable. This is likely the end of the road for Fisker. But definitely not for electric cars. Let’s dispel some myths.

1. The electric car is dead.

This myth is partly my fault, perpetuated by the title of my 2006 documentary, “Who Killed the Electric Car?” The signs back then weren’t promising. Under pressure from car companies and other lobbyists, California rolled back its Zero-Emission Vehicle mandate, which had helped get nearly 5,000 electric cars on the road. The change in the regulation freed carmakers to round up the cars they had leased — and then surreptitiously crush them.

Thankfully, it takes more than a crusher to kill a technology. Today, almost all the major automakers, along with a cast of new players, are investing in and building plug-in cars. California’s mandate has also made a comeback, and other states are considering similar rules.

Fisker’s struggles can be attributed, in part, to the fact that start-ups in any industry have a high rate of failure, and launching a start-up in the automotive sector is especially expensive. That makes it all the more impressive that Fisker’s rival Tesla turned a quarterly profit this year.

A new report from IEE, part of the Edison Foundation, projects that between 5 million and 30 million electric cars will be on U.S. roads by 2035. “The electrification of the vehicle fleet is a foregone conclusion,” says former GM vice chairman (and former electric-car-basher) Bob Lutz.

Economics, politics and technology all played a role in the turnaround. Soaring gas prices in 2008 got everyone complaining. U.S. manufacturers, stuck with large inventories of low-mileage SUVs and facing bankruptcy, watched with envy as Toyota rode the buzz from its Prius hybrid to become the world’s No. 1 carmaker. The chief executives of Detroit’s Big Three further reassessed after being chastised for flying corporate jets to congressional bailout hearings in November 2008. When they returned to Washington two weeks later, they arrived in electric hybrids. Since then, partly with the help of government loans (some already repaid), electric-car technology has made big strides.

2. Electric cars can’t get people where they need to go.

I’ve been driving electric cars for 15 years and have yet to run out of power. But ask people what their biggest hesi*ta*tion is about electric vehicles, and they’re most likely to say something about the cars leaving them stranded. This myth is so pervasive that General Motors applied to trademark the name for it: “range anxiety.” A controversial New York Times test drive in February of Tesla’s Model S, which ended up needing a tow to a charging station, seemed to confirm the fear.

But that test drive — covering more than 500 miles in temperatures as low as 10 degrees — was not your everyday trip. The average American drives fewer than 40 miles a day. That’s well within the 75-mile-plus range of most electric cars. And while batteries do run down faster in extreme cold, on a normal day Tesla’s Model S can go as far as 265 miles on a single charge.

The answer to range anxiety for many carmakers is the plug-in hybrid, an electric car with a backup gasoline engine. The Chevrolet Volt, the Toyota Prius Plug-In and the Ford C-Max Energi all use electric power for the first 20 to 50 miles (or most daily trips) and then switch to gasoline for longer drives.

3. Charging is a headache.

Charging an electric car can be as simple as plugging it into a wall outlet. But AC outlet charging is slow, taking between eight and 24 hours. So it’s not usually the method of first resort.

That’s why most plug-ins are sold with charging docks that work in a home garage and can charge a car in four to eight hours, allowing drivers to treat their cars like their cellphones: topping them off periodically or charging them up overnight.

I didn’t have my own garage when I first leased an electric car, so I often used a public charging station within walking distance of my home. There are now 5,734 public stations in the United States, many with multiple charging points. The newest generation will charge your car nearly 10 times faster than home stations and 50 times faster than an AC outlet. Tesla just installed several of these supercharger stations on the East and West coasts, and Nissan recently announced plans to install 500 in the coming months.

4. Electric cars aren’t any better for the environment.

Electric cars have clear environmental benefits: They don’t require gasoline, they don’t pollute from tailpipes, and they operate at 80 percent efficiency (vs. about 20 percent for internal-combustion engines).

Skeptics will cite a 2012 report from the Union of Concerned Scientists as evidence that electric cars aren’t as green as some people make them out to be. That study correctly notes that autos powered by coal-generated electricity are little better for the environment than small gas-powered cars. But the same report concludes that “consumers should feel confident that driving an electric vehicle yields lower global warming emissions than the average new compact gasoline-powered vehicle.” That’s because only 39 percent of U.S. electricity comes from coal. With the retirement of old power plants and the addition of cleaner energy sources, electric cars will have even greater advantages for the environment.

Another environmental concern is about batteries. Won’t they end up in landfills like billions of disposable batteries do? No. Even gasoline-car batteries avoid that fate when they are exchanged and recycled. And electric-car batteries are valuable as energy-storage devices after life on the road. Backup power systems for utilities, businesses and homes create a secondary market for these batteries before their elements are recycled.

5. Most people will never be able to afford an electric car.

At $102,000, the base price of a 2012 Fisker Karma was clearly beyond the reach of most drivers. Tesla, too, was critiqued for the assumptions built into its recent claim that a Model S could be leased for $500 a month. (The Washington Post calculated that the monthly cost would be closer to $1,000.)

But these two luxury cars have targeted the high-end market. By contrast, the cost of leasing a Nissan Leaf ($199 a month with $1,999 down) is equivalent to leasing a compact gasoline car such as the Mazda3 — except you don’t have to pay for gas.

Keeping electric car sticker prices from decreasing right now are low production volumes and the cost of batteries. But a 2012 McKinsey report estimates that the price of lithium-ion batteries could fall dramatically by 2020.

As the cost of electric-car technology trends downward and the price of oil trends upward, electric cars should prove the more affordable and, based on my experience, more enjoyable choice.

[email protected]

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© The Washington Post Company
 
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Just A Little Deeper Look Into Things-

Thanks James for this thread!

This article by Mr. Chris Paine that ran in Washington Post attempts to counter the 5 myths of electric cars.

I ran across this on April 26, 2013. As you can see below, I fealt a need to address a few of his points- Strongly...

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"[...}A new report from IEE, part of the Edison Foundation, projects that between 5 million and 30 million electric cars will be on U.S. roads by 2035. “The electrification of the vehicle fleet is a foregone conclusion,” says former GM vice chairman[...]"


Actually this source is stronger and more stunning then the IEE, Edison Foundation and states that the electrification of the transportation is happening a whole lot quicker then Chris has been led to believe!

The Wall Street Journal
April 19, 2013, 5:15 a.m. ET

Nearly 22 Million Electric Vehicles Will Be Sold from 2012 to 2020, Forecasts Navigant Research-

"BOULDER, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 19, 2013--
While sales of electric vehicles (EVs) have not met the expectations of governments and automakers, they continue to expand steadily. Both plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) have become widely available in Asia Pacific, North America, and Western Europe, and are being introduced in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. According to a recent report from Navigant Research, a total of 21.9 million EVs will be sold worldwide during the period from 2012 to 2020."

Link to Source- No Paywall!

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130419-904887.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

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"[...]“The electrification of the vehicle fleet is a foregone conclusion,” says former GM vice chairman (and former electric-car-basher) Bob Lutz.[...]"

WHAT? Chris, in you remarkable film, "Revenge of the Electric car", Mr. Lutz states, on camera that he was subject to death threats promoting the Chevy Volt!.

Yes, he did not rescue the EV-1 but surely, you must admit that even mentioning that old history was out of line! One wonders, given the recent editorial content of The Washington Post of the last few years wether above snide comment on Mr. Lutz was added by Mr. Paine's editors...

Mr. Lutz IS the Father of the Chevy Volt and since its deployment has been a relentless backer including his heavy association with Viamotors Inc
( ViaMotors.com ) and his Volt affirming articles as a writer for Forbes-

Source- Forbes- Online

http://www.forbes.com/sites/boblutz/2012/01/30/chevy-volt-and-the-wrong-headed-right/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/boblutz/2012/09/10/the-real-story-on-gms-volt-costs/

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"[...]A controversial New York Times test drive in February of Tesla’s Model S[...]"

While still discussed in cyberspace, data from NYT Writer, Mr. Broders' "Test" Tesla Model S highly disputes his written words as to the events as they unfolded.

Mr. Elon Musk, Tesla CEO, has staunchly defended the companies' product as have others with hands on experience with the Tesla Model S.

Combined with the downplaying of the article by The NYT City Editor, the scores of Tesla Owners and competing Journalists and Reporters who completed the same route as Mr. Broder without incident, the origonal report has been all but discredited and has faded away. Let's let it remain so!

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"[...]The answer to range anxiety for many carmakers is the plug-in hybrid, an electric car with a backup gasoline engine. The Chevrolet Volt, the Toyota Prius Plug-In and the Ford C-Max Energi all use electric power for the first 20 to 50 miles (or most daily trips) and then switch to gasoline for longer drives.[...]"

The Toyota Prius Plug Ins' battery can be fully charged using a standard 110V AC outlet in around 2 1/2 hours. This sounds quite amazing until one understands that the AER ( All Electric Range ) of the 2014 Toyota Prius Plug In is 6- 11 miles- MAYBE!

I would have to plug in the Prius Plug In over 4 times a day, warm weather charging, to equal the 40-55+ miles on a single charge, bout a buck in electricity for my Volt, to not burn any gas in this car, not to mention the Toyotas gas engine assist under demand, regardless of battery SOC.

While the Ford C-Max Energi, the Honda Accord PHEV and the Ford Fusion Energi can travel upwards of 20 miles AER, half the distance of the Chevy Volt, the inclusion of the Toyota Prius Plug In, with its tiny battery, in the group mentioned above was an oversite at best.
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"[...]Charging an electric car can be as simple as plugging it into a wall outlet. But AC outlet charging is slow, taking between eight and 24 hours. So it’s not usually the method of first resort.[...]"

Very confusing to the uneducated masses reading this story as they do not understand that a 265 AER Tesla Model S would take 24+ for the first 98 miles vrs 2 1/2 hours for a full charge with the 6-11 AER Toyota Prius Plug In.

"[...]That’s why most plug-ins are sold with charging docks that work in a home garage and can charge a car in four to eight hours, allowing drivers to treat their cars like their cellphones: topping them off periodically or charging them up overnight.[...]"

No, Chris, most owners of the Chevy Volt, Nissan Leaf, Ford C-Max energi PHEV, Honda
Fit PEV, Mitsubushi IMev PEV, Fisker Karma EV-RE, BMW Active e PEV, Ford Fusion energi PHEV, Mitsubushi Uplander PEV, etc, use the standard 110V AC outlet at their homes and work.

While 220V with an installed device, as you mentioned is more convienent, most owners, driving the Fed estimated average of 25-35 miles a day standard commute do just fine without an upgrade!
...And with north of 1.5 billion AC outlets in North America, we have been EV Charging ready for decades!

Know this, 99 out of 100 people asked on the street do not know that ALL Electric Vehicles charge simply using an AC outlet. They read what you have written above and think that they MUST install a device in their home at to much cost and bother-

They must be told the ease of daily driving using an AC outlet in their home, work, dining or shopping area!
...With permission of course-

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"[...]Another environmental concern is about batteries. Won’t they end up in landfills like billions of disposable batteries do? No.[...]"

Worrying about an unlikely event a decade into the future is senseless. All HOV compliant Electric Cars, PEV, BEV, PHEV, EV-ER, EREV Vehicles sold in California must warranty the High Voltage and Electric Drive systems for 10 years, 150,000 miles. This states strongly to the ultra lifetime usability of the current EV batterys and NOT any enviromental concern into the near future.

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"[...] By contrast, the cost of leasing a Nissan Leaf ($199 a month with $1,999 down) is equivalent to leasing a compact gasoline car such as the Mazda3 — except you don’t have to pay for gas.[...]

-By contrast, the cost of leasing a Chevy Volt ($299.00 a month with $2,499 down, 12,000 miles a year. 2,000 more miles a year then the above mentioned Leaf ) is equivalent to leasing a upscale midsized car such as the Infinity G ---except you don't have to pay for gas, unless you need to!

Source # 1

http://www.chevrolet.com/volt-electric-car.html

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Source # 2

http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/Upscale-Midsize-Cars/


Source # 3

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?11367


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In November of 2011, I drove 120 miles in my gas car, a 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP to see the opening night of Mr. Paine's movie, "Revenge of the Electric Car." in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
This was one month to the day of the first beta deployments of the Chevy Volt in just 6 States and the District of Columbia, a deeply planned limited sales area marketing stratagy that would remain until the end of August the following year when a few more States were brought in.

Mr. Paine was there that night and hosted a robust Q&A session afterwords. It was on that night that I knew that the Automobile Business was about to change, forever!

I respect Mr. Paine for being a major influence in my life as I push foreward with the promotion of sustainability driving.
If any of my above amplifications or corrections of his article entitled "5 Myths About Electric Cars" offends him in any way I state here and now that I am sorry to have done so.

It is my absolute conviction however, that the uninformed masses need to be informed.
Informed in a way that is clear, concise, enlightening and to the point.

Not discussed in Mr. Paine's article was the electric grid.
Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn) has gone on record on the floor of the US Senate stating that the unused electricity at night is our countries'
greatest natural resource-

http://www.torquenews.com/397/senator-alexander-unused-electricity-our-greatest-national-resource

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Remember, the internet never forgets. All anti Electric Vehicle articles, blogs, comments and emails from the last 5 years still thrive online in their complete form. They are unchallengable, uncontestable and far to many uninformed reader stumble opon them in a Google, Yahoo or Bing search reading these pieces as absolute facts.
Remember the friend of yours saying- "The Internet Says...."

Best-

Thomas J. Thias

@AmazingChevVolt

517-622-6081
 

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