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Discussion Starter #1
So my daily work commute is 12 miles to the office. I live in the Denver Suburbs. The elevation at my home is 5600ft. I work in Downtown Denver and the elevation there is 5280 ft.

So when I leave my house the EV range is 52 or 53 miles. But whats really cool is when I arrive at work I still have 52 Miles! I think because its mostly downhill. The ICE is not turning on at all when its above 35 degrees.

When I get home from work I've only used about 10 miles of EV for the entire day. So my charge time is very short overnight. I think this is great and is the beginning of a beautiful relationship with my new Volt!

Of course if its really cold the engine comes on and I lose a whole lot more EV. But even when the temps were below 10 degrees I would get home with 20 EV remaining.

I think this was the perfect car for my type of commute to buy. I'm very impressed so far!
 

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When I was working (retired now) I also had a 12 mile (each way) commute. In my Gen 1 Volt I would usually arrive home with about 20-25 miles remaining. It is really great that almost all of your daily driving can be electric yet there is no "range anxiety".
 

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that sounds fun. I have a Gen 1 and a 38 mile commute (76 miles round trip) going from 1470 ft to 950 ft with free charging at work (yea!)
The upshot of that is (in warm weather) if I drive normally I tend to make it in to work with a mile or two left on the battery and if I'm very careful going home I can usually make it to within a mile before the REX kicks in.

Of course in cold/bad weather all bets are off.

Sometimes I have quite a bit of "battery envy" against you Gen 2 owners <grin>
 

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Sometimes I have quite a bit of "battery envy" against you Gen 2 owners <grin>
Ah, well even with my gen 2 I have "battery envy" for Tesla drivers (and now chevy Bolt drivers) because I hate using gas. My next car is going to be the model 3, I'm ready to go 100% EV!!!
 

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If I were you, I'd experiment with not quite fully charging in the evening. By leaving the car a bit less topped-off, you might still regain a full charge by the time you get to work. That's because when the Volt hits a certain high state of charge, it just rejects the extra energy and doesn't send it to the battery. It really all depends on how much excess regen power is being rejected on your downhill, inbound half of the commute. Of course, if any regen gains are NOT actually exceeding the power needed for the distance traveled, well, this wouldn't work... but I'd still look into it!

Glad to hear you like your new ride!
 

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If I were you, I'd experiment with not quite fully charging in the evening. By leaving the car a bit less topped-off, you might still regain a full charge by the time you get to work.
Agree whole-heartedly with this suggestion! In fact, you may want to try charging every other day given the lack of miles. You could also consider changing your Engine Assist Heat to "Delayed". That will only use the engine <18F. With your commute, you'll probably never use gas even running the heat on max.

My commute is 24 miles each way. No real hills, but I can only make it if its >40F. :/
 

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I also live in the Denver area and have a very short commute to work (about 6-1/2 miles each way with not much elevation change). With my battery fully charged I can drive to work and back, plus come home for lunch using some electric heat and still have 10-15 miles EV range left in the winter. I have the ERDTT set to 15 degrees so the motor doesn't come on till its really cold. So far I haven't had any issues, mechanical, comfort or otherwise - I'm loving this car!

One thing I'd like to try is driving to the top of Mount Evans (highest paved road in N. America, the parking lot at the summit is about 14,200-ish feet elevation). It would be interesting to see how much regen I get on the way down, just for fun/education and to satisfy my curiosity :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I'm going to try what is recommended here and see how it works out. I will stop topping off my charge, and I will charge every other night. After a week or so I will post my results.

Even when its really cold (10 to 20 degrees) and the ERDTT happens I'm still getting home with 35 to 40 miles available. So I could save money on charging by charging every other night.

Thanks everyone!
 

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You could also set up the charging configuration to complete charging an hour after you leave for work. This would have the added benefit of allowing the batteries to be warmer when you depart.
 

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It's great and all you joined the Volt club, but maybe you should've gotten an off-lease, used Gen 1 since it more than meets your commute needs and would save you a lot more money compared to a Gen 2.
 

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Glad to know you are liking your new Volt. You did not mention if you are preconditioning your Volt in the a.m. before you leave. If you precondition your Volt you can enjoy the comfort of always starting out in a warm car and also know that the Volt has preconditioned the temperature of the coolant in the battery heating/cooling loop.

If you choose to precondition, so that the gas engine does not start at colder temperatures you can set the Engine Heat Assist While Plugged In setting to be No so that the gas engine will never run while your Volt is plugged in. You also can set the Engine Heat Assist to Deferred mode so that the gas engine will only come on (once you unplug and manually start your Volt) when the outside temperature is 15 F or below, else by default the gas engine will start whenever you start your the Volt and outside temperature is 35 F or below.

Preconditioning the Volt to heat the car will use some of the battery's charge but since the preconditioning cycle is only 10 minutes the battery drain is not extreme. If you are charging your Volt at Level I (110VAC) the energy recovery time after preconditioning the car is quite a bit longer than if you are charging at Level II (230/240VAC). With Level II the energy used to precondition the Volt will be completely recovered in approx 25 minutes (this includes the 10 minutes while preconditioning plus 10 to 15 minutes after the precondition cycle automatically ends.) Since you will be driving downhill, if you unplug your Volt near the end or just after the 10 minute preconditioning cycle ends this will actually leave some extra battery capacity that can be used to store the energy from the regenerative effect as you drive downhill to lower elevations.
 

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I'm two days in to my 2017 and so far enjoying it very much. We bought two at the same time and my wife's comes in next week.

And I didn't know until the day before I bought the car (happened to mention to someone at work who told me) that my workplace has 6 reserved electric car charging parking spaces. I'm actually quite excited in a geeky way that I can charge it at work. I only have a 12 mile commute each way, so basically I don't need to charge it at home during the week if I charge at work, and only concern myself with plugging it in at home on the weekends.

Actually quite convenient to have a Level II charger at work since my wife will want to charge hers at home - we're having just one Level II charger installed in our garage. That I can charge at work means we don't need to worry about trying to charge two at a time. And there's always the standard level I to top off the other car in the garage if need be.
 

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If you choose to precondition, so that the gas engine does not start at colder temperatures you can set the Engine Heat Assist While Plugged In setting to be No so that the gas engine will never run while your Volt is plugged in. You also can set the Engine Heat Assist to Deferred mode so that the gas engine will only come on (once you unplug and manually start your Volt) when the outside temperature is 15 F or below, else by default the gas engine will start whenever you start your the Volt and outside temperature is 35 F or below.
See bolded part. You have more than enough charge to get to work and back all electric even at 16F.
 

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I'm two days in to my 2017 and so far enjoying it very much. We bought two at the same time and my wife's comes in next week.

And I didn't know until the day before I bought the car (happened to mention to someone at work who told me) that my workplace has 6 reserved electric car charging parking spaces. I'm actually quite excited in a geeky way that I can charge it at work. I only have a 12 mile commute each way, so basically I don't need to charge it at home during the week if I charge at work, and only concern myself with plugging it in at home on the weekends.

Actually quite convenient to have a Level II charger at work since my wife will want to charge hers at home - we're having just one Level II charger installed in our garage. That I can charge at work means we don't need to worry about trying to charge two at a time. And there's always the standard level I to top off the other car in the garage if need be.
Congrats on the workplace charging! Depending on popularity of the 6 spots, you may consider avoiding them if BEVs are present. Otherwise, you lucky SOB, you hit the jackpot.
 

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Welcome to the Forum MileHigh. You made a good choice with your Volt purchased. My wife and I are on our 2nd Volt. We traded our 2014 Volt with 40,000 miles for our current 2016 Volt, now with well over 10,000 miles.

You have purchased, in my opinion, the most technically advanced car for the money. A car where you have the option of using electricity or gas for your travel. What other car can you get up to 60 miles on pure electric power and than get well over 40 mpg just on regular grade gas? A car you can buy for the price, when you consider the available tax credits, of a well equipped 2017 Honda Civic, and the Volt, when running just on gas, beats the EPA Civic mpg....
 
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