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Discussion Starter #1
Last week my cabin heater (HVAC) on my 2016 Volt suddenly stopped producing any heat. Also no defrost. Cold air only coming out. Not fun in the freezing temps here in the Northeast. After two days, I called my dealer. No appointment for three days. This morning I was making a 50+mile commute into New York City. After my routine 15 mile EV drive, I perform my typical transition to ICE mode for the high speed highway portion (about 15 miles). Five miles into the ICE portion I get a warning "Engine Overheat - Reduce Speed Immediately". I was driving about 65 MPH and outside temp was 38 degrees F. I slowed down and pull over. Engine coolant temp was 258 degrees!! I tried putting on the HVAC heat to siphon some engine heat and it did nothing - more cool air from the vents and no decrease in engine temp. I switched to EV. Coolant temp fell to about 75F. After 10 miles I returned to ICE mode. Coolant temp shot up in 30 seconds to 230+F.

After toggling between EV and ICE mode I hobbled into work. Opened the hood and inspected things. The radiator reservoir was basically empty. Then I inspected the hoses and area. There was obvious evidence of a coolant leak. Then I saw this (see attached photo). A puncture in my coolant line on the underside near this triangular cast metal piece on the engine. I ran my finger over the metal piece - it is insanely sharp and is the obvious cause of the radiator line puncture. What on earth is this metal piece for and WHY is it SO SHARP!!!

Has anyone else had this problem yet? This seems to be a disaster for many owners waiting to happen and an obvious Recall item. Then when I went to restart the car I got a failure of basically every single car system. Airbags, front and rear cameras, side view warning system, etc., etc. WTF!!! After driving for another 20 minutes, I stopped and restarted the car and the warnings went away.

I love my Volt, but this is freaking me out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wait till it happens to you! I just had my car in for two separate recalls. They obviously didn't fix this or ignored it. Plus what kind of damage was done to the engine components that might present itself now or months/years down the road when the car is no longer under warranty?! Thanks for being so glib.
 

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When the car went into reduced propulsion mode you should have stopped and had the car towed to the nearest dealership. Continuing to drive without coolant may have ruined your internal combustion engine. The only thing they will do now is repair the hose, refill the antifreeze and hope for the best that you didn't break anything, and only time will tell wherther there is any premature wear that won't manifest itself until later.

Btw, not everything is a recall, some of these are service bulletins.
 

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Unfortunately I think the OP made an obvious problem worse by ignoring it until the car gave up. Live and learn.
 

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Yea, it's not as bad as oil pressure warnings another volt owner ignored and trashed their engine but when you get warning lights, you stop the car. Hopefully it's not to expensive for you.
 

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Sorry to hear of your headaches, filmvolt. It's a crap shoot between missing important work or events and properly calling towing services (be it under warranty or out of pocket).

I, however, did not know about this and will be checking the coolant hose in my Volt is starting to wear prematurely. I gotta re-visit the forums stickies again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I posted this thread to help all the other owners out there so they know to check their radiator hose routing and see if it is routed across the sharp triangular transmission boss. If it is routed that way, the hose will almost certainly be punctured at some point.

Contrary to all the nasty comments here, I did not ignore the issue or the warning the engine gave me, however at 4:00am in the morning on my way to work where I hold a mission critical position, sitting there waiting for hours for a tow truck with no way to get to work was not an option for me. But I really appreciate all the holier than thou replies to my post.

I am a highly tech and mechanically savvy person who has installed his own 220V lines in his garage and often repaired things on many cars. I am not an idiot. Seeing a stupid design flaw like this exist is what prompted me to post in the first place. I hoped to help others out who may have already or will have the same issue. I appreciate "somms" reply with the Service Bulletin but GM should issue a recall on this. I've had four already on my 2016 Volt for mostly software issues, none which seemed serious enough to cause engine failure or trip interruption so why only a SB this issue? If your hose is improperly routed and is sitting on the transmission boss, as your engine moves up and down on the engine dampening mounts, the hose (which is mounted to the coolant reservoir attached to the frame on one end and the radiator on the other end) does not move. As you hit any bumps in the road or the engine is rattled around (think winter potholes) it will rub and stab into the radiator hose and eventually puncture it. Did all you so smart "Senior Members" out there think of that? Spend less time making smart ass posts and responses on this forum and let it be a place to help and educate people who love their Volt. Remember what your mom said - "If you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all."

When I originally lost hot air flow from the HVAC system several days ago, I searched this forum and could only find posts relating to other issues like blown fuses, bad relays, etc. None mentioned the possibility of a punctured heater water auxiliary pump hose as a possible problem. If it had I would have checked for that and found my problem before the engine overheat warning.
 

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I posted this thread to help all the other owners out there so they know to check their radiator hose routing and see if it is routed across the sharp triangular transmission boss. If it is routed that way, the hose will almost certainly be punctured at some point.

Contrary to all the nasty comments here, I did not ignore the issue or the warning the engine gave me, however at 4:00am in the morning on my way to work where I hold a mission critical position, sitting there waiting for hours for a tow truck with no way to get to work was not an option for me. But I really appreciate all the holier than thou replies to my post.

I am a highly tech and mechanically savvy person who has installed his own 220V lines in his garage and often repaired things on many cars. I am not an idiot. Seeing a stupid design flaw like this exist is what prompted me to post in the first place. I hoped to help others out who may have already or will have the same issue. I appreciate "somms" reply with the Service Bulletin but GM should issue a recall on this. I've had four already on my 2016 Volt for mostly software issues, none which seemed serious enough to cause engine failure or trip interruption so why only a SB this issue? If your hose is improperly routed and is sitting on the transmission boss, as your engine moves up and down on the engine dampening mounts, the hose (which is mounted to the coolant reservoir attached to the frame on one end and the radiator on the other end) does not move. As you hit any bumps in the road or the engine is rattled around (think winter potholes) it will rub and stab into the radiator hose and eventually puncture it. Did all you so smart "Senior Members" out there think of that? Spend less time making smart ass posts and responses on this forum and let it be a place to help and educate people who love their Volt. Remember what your mom said - "If you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all."
Thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of this and just checked my hose and it was placed properly away from the sharp transmission boss.
Your post about this will help someone.
 

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Seeing a stupid design flaw like this exist is what prompted me to post in the first place. I hoped to help others out who may have already or will have the same issue.
Mission accomplished, I just checked mine and it is OK, so thanks. I don't know that it's a "design" flaw as if it's installed properly then there is no issue, right? Maybe it's better termed as an "installation" flaw that can occur if the installer doesn't route it properly and sets the table for problems down the road?
 

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I searched this forum and could only find posts relating to other issues like blown fuses, bad relays, etc. None mentioned the possibility of a punctured heater water auxiliary pump hose as a possible problem. If it had I would have checked for that and found my problem before the engine overheat warning.
We've had a thread on here about this potential issue for a while now
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread...ervice-Bulletin-16-NA-114&highlight=16-NA-114
Check your hoses people! (or get a dealer to do it)
WOT
 

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I'm sorry if you found my answer 'smart' or "holier than thou'. I did look for an inoffensive Canadian way to put it.

Since I obviously failed, maybe I'll try it straight up.

Given the symptoms, the very first thing a highly tech and mechanically savvy person would look for as a cause would be a coolant leak. These are easy to spot, and usually blindingly obvious: just pop the hood, check the reservoir or look for a puddle under the car. By your initial post, you had plenty time to find this before you put yourself in real trouble. You can't avoid some responsibility.

This was a known issue with some early production Gen2 Volts, and I'm sure owners of those vehicles will appreciate your reminder. I'm just as sure they should take warning from your experience.
 

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Hopefully, all is okay. Sounds like you watched the coolant temp like a hawk after you began toggling back and forth between ICE and EV.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We've had a thread on here about this potential issue for a while now
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread...ervice-Bulletin-16-NA-114&highlight=16-NA-114
Check your hoses people! (or get a dealer to do it)
WOT

Thanks. I wish I had seen that thread earlier. I really like this forum, but there is not enough time in life to read all the posts. Obviously for me and others there was a bad installation. Either the procedure was changed at some time or a particular worker at the factory improperly installed it. It is a strange that the sharp, triangular flange on the transmission even exists. It seems to serve no current purpose in the car. Best I can imagine is that it exists as an installation and alignment aid during manufacturing.

Hopefully someone searching heating issues will see my original post and check their lines as a potential cause.

The reason I probably never saw a coolant leak on my garage floor is the large amount of rain and snow we have been having and also the fact that it was obviously slowly draining only while in ICE mode which I generally only use in the middle of long drives and my commutes., so the coolant was only leaking during driving in ICE mode while I was on the road. By the time I would get home or to work the coolant temp would be low enough that it probably wasn't flowing through the line and leaking anymore.

Live, experience and learn. Now I know. The dual dynamics in play in a car like the Volt are unlike any other.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Btw, I actually pulled up this forum on my phone while on the side of the highway to check what the safe operating range was for the coolant temp. I really appreciate all the amazing info that the forum members share here.
 
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