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‘13 Chevrolet Volt, Base, E-Flex @ 181K Miles/203 Lifetime MPG/AER: 44 mi | Volt Nickname: Cornpop
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I usually go to the dealership for only tire rotations but this dealership seems to not know the correct rotation pattern for the Chevrolet Volt or FWD vehicles in general. They took the rear tires and directly mounted them to the front without crossing them to the opposing side from the original position, like how it should be for FWD cars with directional tires. They rotated the tires like they're directional style tires which I believe they're not (Michelin Energy Saver A/S 215/55 R17).
I emailed the service manager and he seemed to believe the service technicians were correct, despite giving him evidence of what that owners manual states. I'll attach his response. Handwriting Book Font Publication Pattern
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Thoughts?
Thank You!
 

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He said that the techs "SHOULD" know but they obviously do not.
 
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Question, did they cross the front tires when moving them to the rear. It doesn't matter which way the cross is done as long as it's done and it's consistent through at least four rotations.
 
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‘13 Chevrolet Volt, Base, E-Flex @ 181K Miles/203 Lifetime MPG/AER: 44 mi | Volt Nickname: Cornpop
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They did not :(
 

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How did you discover the incorrect rotation?
 

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on mine I could tell because they also did not reset the Tire sensors to the new location.

they did follow the chart BUT had the chart upside down
 

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‘13 Chevrolet Volt, Base, E-Flex @ 181K Miles/203 Lifetime MPG/AER: 44 mi | Volt Nickname: Cornpop
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I took note of where each tire was before going it and I watch the servicemen because I have a deep distrust for them.
 

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‘13 Chevrolet Volt, Base, E-Flex @ 181K Miles/203 Lifetime MPG/AER: 44 mi | Volt Nickname: Cornpop
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They finally acknowledged their mistake :)
 

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Hi, I usually go to the dealership for only tire rotations but this dealership seems to not know the correct rotation pattern for the Chevrolet Volt or FWD vehicles in general. They took the rear tires and directly mounted them to the front without crossing them to the opposing side from the original position, like how it should be for FWD cars with directional tires. They rotated the tires like they're directional style tires which I believe they're not (Michelin Energy Saver A/S 215/55 R17).
I emailed the service manager and he seemed to believe the service technicians were correct, despite giving him evidence of what that owners manual states. I'll attach his response. View attachment 173369 View attachment 173370

Thoughts?
Thank You!
I never change direction of my tires, so it’s just a front to rear and vice versa, regardless of what the manual says. Talk to a knowledgeable tire guy. They’ll tell you not to change rotational direction on quality radial.
 

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Tire rotations are very important to even wear and performance throughout the tire life, but to cross or not, has been an argument as long as I can remember. Of course, this doesn't apply to directional tires. The reason for crossing the rears to the front is, primary force direction (opposite for rear wheel drive) and loading. Primary force direction is opposite, front to rear. Rotating the rears to opposite fronts ensures the primary force direction of the (new) primary traction tire is not abruptly changed. Abruptly changing the force direction causes additional wear, internally and externally, as the plies are resistant to the new force direction. After a few heating cycles, the plies balance into their new force direction, which is significantly less abrupt on the rear. That is the scientific explanation. Is it actually practical, today? I dunno. What is important is, choose a pattern and stick to it. Random swaps are bad policy, in any case. I rotate 5 tires, having a full-size spare on an OEM wheel. I use the pattern in the manual (been doing it that way since radials were a thing), and swap the spare into the pattern the same, every time. The OEM tires on my 2017 Volt were replaced at 82K miles, with an estimated 10K+ remaining (4 tire rotation on that set).
 

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Tire rotations are very important to even wear and performance throughout the tire life, but to cross or not, has been an argument as long as I can remember. Of course, this doesn't apply to directional tires. The reason for crossing the rears to the front is, primary force direction (opposite for rear wheel drive) and loading. Primary force direction is opposite, front to rear. Rotating the rears to opposite fronts ensures the primary force direction of the (new) primary traction tire is not abruptly changed. Abruptly changing the force direction causes additional wear, internally and externally, as the plies are resistant to the new force direction. After a few heating cycles, the plies balance into their new force direction, which is significantly less abrupt on the rear. That is the scientific explanation. Is it actually practical, today? I dunno. What is important is, choose a pattern and stick to it. Random swaps are bad policy, in any case. I rotate 5 tires, having a full-size spare on an OEM wheel. I use the pattern in the manual (been doing it that way since radials were a thing), and swap the spare into the pattern the same, every time. The OEM tires on my 2017 Volt were replaced at 82K miles, with an estimated 10K+ remaining (4 tire rotation on that set).
Me too, I follow the manual on tire rotations. My four 2011 OEM tires delivered 70k mies with 4/32" tread remaining when I replaced them. Say what you want, but that's an outstanding result.
 
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Talk to a knowledgeable tire guy. They’ll tell you not to change rotational direction on quality radial.
Yep, "tire guys" always know more than trained engineers with millions of dollars of research and testing backing up their conclusions.
 
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