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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Federal Funding for EV Infrastructure Spreads to Communities

http://www.plugincars.com/federal-funding-ev-infrastructure-spreads-communities-107820.html

"An early criticism of the federal government’s investment in electric car infrastructure was that it focused too narrowly on a few locations. But yesterday the US Department of Energy announced 16 projects to support EV adoption in 24 states and the District of Columbia—in an effort to encourage adoption more broadly across the United States.

The Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Initiative Awards, totaling $8.5 million, were provided to communities ranging in experience—from those with extensive electric car charging plans in the works, to those just getting started.

With these funds, one-year projects will help communities address specific needs, such as updating permitting processes, revising codes, training municipal personnel, promoting public awareness, and developing incentives. Community-specific plans will be created and be made publicly available, allowing all stakeholders to learn best practices.

California's South Coast Air Quality Management District was awarded $1 million to create a unified statewide approach to planning and implementation of plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure.
The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority was granted $994,500 to develop a plan for a network of electric vehicle charging stations throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions.
In Texas, $1 million will be spent to develop a plan for plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the Texas Triangle cities of Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston/Galveston, and Austin/San Antonio. Additional planning work is being conducted in Houston and Austin.
EV readiness and deployment strategies will also be created for Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia. Each of the Clean Cities approved projects will receive at least $300,000.

These latest grants are dwarfed by the D.O.E.’s $114.8 million of funding for The EV Project, designed to deploy and evaluate private and public charging in California, Oregon, Washington Arizona, Tennessee and Texas. Those funds were made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), and were matched by another $115 million in private investment.

The funding was in line with the Obama administration's larger goal of stimulating green jobs-creating infrastructure development, but like some other projects, it's been slow to get off the ground. The EV Project has come under fire in states like Oregon, where it installed its first charger in June—despite having initially promised 1100 chargers by that time. According to Ecotality, the problem with the planned timetable for the EV Project was that it outstripped actual electric vehicle deliveries.

One of the benefits of the Clean Cities Initiative's community-specific funding model is that money (and chargers) can go where they're needed, when they're needed—without the risk of overbuilding some areas at the expense of others in an attempt to meet deadlines."
 

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Am I reading correctly a summary of the work product descriptions of these grants?

create a unified statewide approach to planning... to develop a plan... to develop a plan... Additional planning work is being conducted... readiness and deployment strategies will also be created
Having lived with the apparently extremely well planned out [sic] EcoTality deployment in California, forgive me for being underthrilled with the product goals of this additional $8.5M spending.
 

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James.. thanks for the post.. I followed through the links and have already contacted my local Clean Cities office. Been pushing the University and wanted to engage the city and this was perfect timing. I can say I won't be pushing to just develop a plan, I'll be pushing for a "spiral development planning", where the install some, get experience and then install some more. Not just plan, plan plan.

In the deeper links I also found that my University will be getting funding to launch a new EV drivetrain graduate program. One of my colleagues Greg Plett has been working GM funded project (with U. Mich), and some of the funding is to advance that to a degree program. Your post allowed me to congratulate Greg and push the dean (both were surprised I know, as they just heard yesterday and it was not official yet). Cool to connect via gm-volt back home.. Thanks
 

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Funding to get chargers out there is one thing that is important for BEVs. Not so much for Volt due to the CS-mode.

I've contacted our state's consumer advocate regarding TOU metering for PA's utilities. Until we can get TOU rates and smart-meters out into the community, there is less incentive to go electric at all. Paying near 0.18kWh for night-time electric puts the cost per mile at about 0.06 (2.40 for 40 miles) and that's "not much" less than 40 mpg using $3.65 gasoline. Now, if we can get down to a more appropriate TOU rate of 0.07 for night-time recharging, we'll be under 1.00 for 40 miles which will help with cost containment to pay extra for an EV. Right now, the primary reason to buy an EV or EREV in PA is to help save national oil usage and the price of admission is your opportunity cost to feel good about that. EVs will remain a niche, in some states, until we see a visible improvement on a state-by-state basis to support a charging infrastructure using off-peak TOU rate plans. Some states and regions are ready to go, others not for a few more years. Our utility, PECO, here in PA has a smart-meter program but it is very limited and no rate plans are documented or laid out yet.

One thing about our PA energy consumer advocate is he is on the energy advisory board of the DOE chairman Dr. Chu. One problem I forsee is that there may be a back-lash in 2012 and we may see a change in POTUS and his cabinet and this may mean a lot of clamping down on energy programs should that happen. Get in while we can and try to make for beneficial programs now.
 

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Ouch.. .18 is bad.. even before TOU we were only paying .16, and that is with our our choice for "renewable" (a .02 surcharge if I recall think). With TOU we are at .05 for "green energy" for 10:30-5:30 and .09 for 5:30- finish charging (8am)

Pretty sure PPL introduced TOU in 2010 (after their rate changes caused some backlash and they lost 1/3 or about half a million customers.) Maybe you can use that to push the state as an example of where its used and why they need to help regulate it.
Thought ConEd had it as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ouch is right, we pay 0.095 at peak to Lansing Board of Water and Light.

I am a participant in the Lansing Board of Water and Light/Department of Energy Plug-in Electric Vehicle Community Project. LBWL will be installing a seperate meter to provide off-peak charging rates.

You may want to start helping PECO's smart meter program managers to the extent you are able (and you have the knowledge to do so). These folks are starved for technical resources. Eventually, someone will drop out of their program, and they will be free to select you.

James
 
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