GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Faraday says its main investor is ‘deliberately starving’ it into bankruptcy. A new court filing details Faraday Future’s attempt to break the deal, but the EV startup only has enough cash to last into December.


https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/13/18088438/faraday-future-electric-cars-ev-news-layoffs-bankruptcy

Say what you will about Tesla (and I have said plenty, good and bad), they are still holding on and may actual survive another 5 years.

Meanwhile, other start ups like FF never get to the 'up' stage, much less a production car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,181 Posts
Unfortunately, the founder, Jia Yueting, was a paper billionaire, ie his wealth was tied up in the stock of his original company, LeEco. Probably would have had better luck launching in China, than in the US, but I get the sense he may have thought a US-based company was a way to get his wealth out of the country. Unfortunately for him, you can't fool all the people, all the time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,277 Posts
Look at this list:
DEFUNCT CAR COMPANIES SINCE 1960:

American Motors (AMC) (1966–1987)
Apollo (1962–1964)
Aptera Motors (2005-2011)
Autoette (1948–1970)
Bricklin (1974–1976)
Checker (1922–1982)
Citicar (1974–1976)
Corbin (1999–2003)
Dale (1974)
DeLorean (1981–1982)
DeSoto (1928–1961)
Dovell (circa 1980s)
Eagle (1988–1998)
Edsel (1958–1960)
Electricar (1950–1966)
Eshelman (1953–1961)
Fiberfab (circa 1960s)
Fisker (2007-2013)
Frazen (1951–1962)
Gaslight (1960-circa 1961)
Geo (1989–1997)
Henney (1960–1964)
Hummer (1992–2010)
Imperial (1955–1975, 1981–1983)
International Harvester (1907–1975)
King Midget (1947–1970)
Mercury (1939–2010)
Nu-Klea (1959–1960)
Oldsmobile (1897–2004)
Plymouth (1928–2001)
Pontiac (1926–2010)
Powell (1930s-1960s)
Rambler (1958–1969)
REO (or Reo) (1905–1975)
Saab (1937–2012)
Saturn (1985–2010)
Studebaker (1902–1967)
Stutz (1968–1987)
Stutz (1968–1987)
Vector (1971–1999, 2006-2010)
White (1902–1981)
Willys (1916–1918, 1930–1942, 1953–1963)




And hundreds here:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defunct_automobile_manufacturers_of_the_United_States
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Hmmm, those are not all companies. Many are brands of companies still in existence. And some didn't go away, but morphed...REO became Oldsmobile, which was a brand that eventually went away. Other examples there as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,172 Posts
Hmmm, those are not all companies. Many are brands of companies still in existence. And some didn't go away, but morphed...REO became Oldsmobile, which was a brand that eventually went away. Other examples there as well.
Oldsmobile was named after the founder of the company, founded as Olds Motor Vehicle Company in 1897. The founder, Ransom E. Olds left Olds Motor Vehicle in 1904 to found REO Motor Car. GM purchased Olds Motor Vehicle in 1908 and renamed it to the common name for the cars - Oldsmobile.

Olds Motor Vehicle Company was the first car company to use an assembly line, which Henry Ford later put onto a conveyer belt to create the first moving assembly line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Oldsmobile was named after the founder of the company, founded as Olds Motor Vehicle Company in 1897. The founder, Ransom E. Olds left Olds Motor Vehicle in 1904 to found REO Motor Car. GM purchased Olds Motor Vehicle in 1908 and renamed it to the common name for the cars - Oldsmobile.

Olds Motor Vehicle Company was the first car company to use an assembly line, which Henry Ford later put onto a conveyer belt to create the first moving assembly line.
Correct, so Oldsmobile was never a "company", but a division and Brand of GM..so the "car company" never went away. One could argue that General Motors Corporation went away through bankruptcy and re-emerged as General Motors Company, LLC...but the "company" never ceased production. Brands and nameplates come and go in virtually every industry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,172 Posts
Correct, so Oldsmobile was never a "company", but a division and Brand of GM..so the "car company" never went away. One could argue that General Motors Corporation went away through bankruptcy and re-emerged as General Motors Company, LLC...but the "company" never ceased production. Brands and nameplates come and go in virtually every industry.
Old Motor Company's cars were referred to as Oldsmobiles, so when GM bought the company in 1908 (after it had been in existance for 11 years) it named the division Oldsmobile.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,680 Posts
Correct, so Oldsmobile was never a "company", but a division and Brand of GM..so the "car company" never went away. One could argue that General Motors Corporation went away through bankruptcy and re-emerged as General Motors Company, LLC...but the "company" never ceased production. Brands and nameplates come and go in virtually every industry.
Oldsmobile most certainly was a company - just not in living memory. Prior to 1908, it was an independent manufacturer. After GM bought it, they gradually transitioned it to just another badge and option set on the GM corporate cars. Aside from Saturn and Edsell and some recent luxury marquees, I think the rest of the "brands" are the same story - formerly independent companies bought out by bigger fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
But was the COMPANY name Olds Motor Company...or Oldsmobile? Referred to doesn't mean company name (prior to 1908) This is all minutia but I don't get the point of the list....as inaccurate as it is for many of the BRANDS listed.

Note the title of the list...."since 1960"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,476 Posts
Starting a car company is not easy, in America or elsewhere, Bricklin was basically Canadian (made in New Brunswick) DeLorean, English (made in Ireland). There have been over 1800 English car companies the have at least produced one prototype and are no longer in existence.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,680 Posts
Again, minutia. Does the list portray accurate information, especially given the title?
I think the list was introduced for the purpose of demonstrating that building modern cars in a profitable fashion is hard and lots of folks have tried and failed at it, and I think the list is sufficient to that intended purpose, despite the issues with the details.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,617 Posts
I think it would be more correct to say that the Olds company ceased to exist in 1908. Similarly for the other company/brands that were purchased. Once you are purchased, you no longer exist as a company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
A brand or product line is definitely not the same thing as a "company," but I think it is relevant that certain brands have failed or been taken off the market. It indicates that their product lines eventually failed in the market place. Whether a large corporation owned the brand doesn't change that fact. I think it still makes the point that it is hard for a new product line in the car industry to gain and keep market share long term. The list of brands that are successful to date is a lot shorter than that one.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top