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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have an L2 EVSE installed in the garage but used for outside charging and is in accord with local electrical code? (cord not run under the garage door)

I acquired my Volt 3 days ago and greatly see the need for an L2 EVSE. I cannot park in the garage (wife's car takes presedence :) ). I'm in the process of gathering the information needed for the installation. It makes sense to me to put the 240 outlet and EVSE inside on the garage wall and run the charge cord through the exterior wall to the car. There are advantages to this configuration such as:
  1. the EVSE is not out in the weather
  2. it allows a greater selection of EVSE's since it is indoor
  3. the EVSE is secured from being ripped off the wall, smashed, or stolen
  4. unless the car was plugged in and charging there is no high voltage available on the exterior of the home.

I fear that this configuration violates code and waiting to hear back from (so far, unresponsive) electricians. Can you validate whether this is a possible solution (do you have or have seen this type of installation)?

-=JGR

BTW: I've searched the forums and haven't found any discussion pertaining to my specific question. If I have overlooked a post please kindly direct me and resist the urge to be spiteful.
 

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I cannot park in the garage (wife's car takes presedence :)
Does wife's car require charging every night? (Seems like the precedence is reversed.)

I would suggest "notching" a corner trench under the door sill on one side and laying the J1772 cable in the trench. Or you could install a small trap door that is just large enough to pass the cable through the wall. (NOT IN THE DOOR.) But both of these suggestions will require a significantly long J1772 cable. (Longer than standard length?) These extra installation requirements will add cost to the installation. However... you will need to check and see if this is a code violation. Your electrician should know the answer to this question. Charging the Volt IN the garage and keeping the wife's car outdoors will save MONEY on the installation cost. (Money the wife can spend on new shoes?)

However whenever the J1772 cord is plugged into the car you run the risk of Vandalism. Someone can unplug your car. Someone can cut the cable and steal your J1772 connector. And the connector will be exposed to rain and weather.

Seems like parking the wife's locked car outdoors and putting your Volt (which requires charging every night...) in the garage is a more logical solution. (I understand that "logic" and "reason" does not always apply to wives.)
 

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Yes, you can have the EVSE in the garage and a long cable and J1772 plug going outside, because that is how I am installing mine (I have a EMW JuiceBox EVSE with a wireless remote and a 20-foot cable). There is only one condition based on the distance: you have to use a heavier gage cable. If your L2 EVSE is rated as 30 A, use a J1772 cable rated higher (the next gage is for 40 A, which is what I have), and so on. The higher code requirements for long cables is to prevent heating and voltage drops, but you can wire up to 100 feet in some states.

I do recommend putting a protection cap on the J1772 plug, or install an external box with a lock to place the plug and cable inside.
 

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I mounted mine close enough to the door that I can reach outside (barely) plus charge in either bay. I just run the cord under the garage door as the door and floor are not aligned. There is a considerable gap. Plus the door has a very large rubber bumper strip. No issues.

There are some considerations such as being too close to the door mechanism that it could (possibly) pinch the cord. There was something in my install manual about that and the height above the floor.

I wouldn't do anything like punch a hole in the wall. There are grommet and chaffing considerations that may not be code. If you have a lined hole (like a dog door), it's still not good, but, better. There are also plastic hole-in-the-wall liners you can get made specifically for electrical, however, I don't think they are supposed to be used for temporary cable like extension cords and EVSE cords.

Better to make a channel in the floor under the door after inspection. Maybe wrap a little tape around the cord to prevent chaffing. Although that hasn't been an issue in my case. The cord on the GE is pretty tough.

Edit:
Found the PDF.
Step 3: Install wall mount bracket to the wall. Use the provided template to locate
wall-mounting holes to ensure hole locations match the bracket. Distance from
floor to bottom of wall mount bracket should be 18” minimum for indoor use, 24”
minimum for outdoor use, and 38” maximum for all applications per NEC 625.39.

Nothing about mechanical door parts, but, they are in NEC somewhere.

Within NEC are also allowances for 'temporary' extension cords such as for Christmas lights etc. If your EVSE is portable, it may fall under these guidelines.
 

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I know I know the Volts unit is ok to charge outside in the rain, but I do so wish it came with a "charging boot. Something to slip over the plug once you plug in your car. Maybe a collapsible ring or something. IDK
 

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Does anyone have an L2 EVSE installed in the garage but used for outside charging and is in accord with local electrical code? (cord not run under the garage door)
I doubt you'll be able to do what you want, as it's not allowed by code to have a flexible cord run through a wall. A carport with an open side would be one thing, but with a fully enclosed garage you'd technically have to mount the EVSE outside the garage to be legal.

Specifically, NEC section 400.8 says that you can't run a flexible cord "through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended or dropped ceilings, or floors" or "through doorways, windows, or similar openings"

Just buy a Clipper Creek LCS-25 and mount it outside your garage.
 

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..

..It makes sense to me to put the 240 outlet and EVSE inside on the garage wall and run the charge cord through the exterior wall to the car. There are advantages to this configuration such as:
  1. the EVSE is not out in the weather
  2. it allows a greater selection of EVSE's since it is indoor
  3. the EVSE is secured from being ripped off the wall, smashed, or stolen
  4. unless the car was plugged in and charging there is no high voltage available on the exterior of the home.
...ul.
the clipper creek LCS-20 is $395, has a great reputation on this forum, 3 year warranty and made in the US and can be installed indoors or out. I don't know why you would feel constrained to buy an indoor only unit and create a cluudgee installation.


The LCS 25 has a higher current rating if you are thinking about someday buying a car that has a higher rate charger than the volt ( an electron hog if you will...) and a 25 foot cord and is $520...
 

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It makes sense to me to put the 240 outlet and EVSE inside on the garage wall and run the charge cord through the exterior wall to the car. ....... I fear that this configuration violates code and waiting to hear back from (so far, unresponsive) electricians.
You don't mention what kind of "through the wall" installation you're talking about. And even if you did only an electrician or inspector licensed in your area can give you a firm answer. Can it be done? Absolutely. How will it be done? The electrician will know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ah! Thank you. Very nice install, I hope I can come up with a solution as nice as that!

I'll probably just have an electrician wire up a 30A 240V outlet for me in the garage and do the rest myself, thanks again. I'm surprised this is not more commonly discussed...
 

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One Volt owner ran a 3" plastic pipe through the wall and can pass the plug end through that for outside charging, and can pull it back inside when not used. I don't know the legality of that though. It would probably depend on the State/City codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
1 of 3 Electricians responded. The single quote that I received so far is $675 indoor or $875 outdoor for a 40A 240V outlet (cost of permits included). Seems indecent considering the install is within 2 feet of the meter with the breaker directly on the other side of the wall. He also said our electrical code does not allow the power cord to go through the wall. Expletive! I still like the idea of using a 240V outlet so if I sell my home I can easily take the EVSE with me.

For those of you who have your EVSE outdoors, do you have yours hardwired? Have you had any problems with vandalism or someone using your power?
 

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1 of 3 Electricians responded. The single quote that I received so far is $675 indoor or $875 outdoor for a 40A 240V outlet (cost of permits included). Seems indecent considering the install is within 2 feet of the meter with the breaker directly on the other side of the wall. He also said our electrical code does not allow the power cord to go through the wall. Expletive! I still like the idea of using a 240V outlet so if I sell my home I can easily take the EVSE with me.

For those of you who have your EVSE outdoors, do you have yours hardwired? Have you had any problems with vandalism or someone using your power?
Electricians don't work cheap. Just the permit requires drawing up a plan, delivering it to your city's planning dept, waiting for approval, and then after the job is done, calling the city inspector to come out and sign it off. I'll bet the permit and inspector part is half the cost! SPX was charging $1500 to install anywhere.

...thinking more about this: Ask the electrician if he can do the inside install without the permits.

As for through the wall, have him install it inside, then have a handyman set up a 3" PVC pipe and slotted cap so you can pass it through or pull it back at will. Here's a link yoyodyn's setup (with pictures): Volt Driveway Charging Setup ...only I would use a slip-on cap myself.

One of yoyodyn's pictures:
 

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You don't mention what kind of "through the wall" installation you're talking about. And even if you did only an electrician or inspector licensed in your area can give you a firm answer. Can it be done? Absolutely. How will it be done? The electrician will know.
No it can't, electrical code prohibits running flexible cord through a wall, or any opening in a wall (including a door or window) In the US it prohibited under Section 400.8 of the NEC, and in Canada it is prohibited by Section 4-012(3) of the CEC.

Just the permit requires drawing up a plan

...

Ask the electrician if he can do the inside install without the permits.
Around here the homeowner can get a permit to do the work themselves. A permit for me to install an EVSE and the associated wiring and breaker would cost $96 (which includes up to 3 inspections at no cost)

If you find an electrician willing to do work without a legally required permit, RUN
 

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No it can't, electrical code prohibits running flexible cord through a wall, or any opening in a wall (including a door or window) In the US it prohibited under Section 400.8 of the NEC, and in Canada it is prohibited by Section 4-012(3) of the CEC.
Example: Output cord from the EVSE goes into a J-box and is tied to THHN which is run to an outdoor box through EMT. The remainder of the output cord is tied to the THHN in the exterior box. Gotta think outside the box (horrible pun). In this example no flex cord runs through the wall.
 

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Just had my Clipper Creek LCS-20 installed inside the garage right by the door.
Cut a notch in the wall frame where it meets the garage door to pass the wire through without it going under the garage door.
Not permanent so I can bring it back in the garage anytime I want.
Mounted a DIY pedestal outside with the Clipper Creek holster and a cord holder.

 

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Violating Section 400.8 of the National Electrical Code is not a good idea. Sure some people have run flexible cords through a wall. Sure it works. No it will not instantly burst into flames. Yes your Volt will charge this way.

What it will do is give your homeowners insurance company a 100% iron clad excuse NOT to cover your home if a fire burns it down.

Installing equipment without permits and code compliance voids your homeowners policy. (You might as well cancel your policy and not have any.) Heck they can even squirm out of paying if your EVSE is not UL or CE approved. (Sorry home-brew Open EVSE builders...)

Don't give your insurance company a reason to squirm out of their obligations. Do it to code. Get your permits. (Do it right. Do it once.)
 
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