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What's your desired EV Range of the next Chevy Volt?

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Based on VoltStats pattern of trip distribution it seems that the mileage pattern of Volt owners is bi-modal. This means that there's significant number of drivers out there that are commuting to work within the 40 mile EV range and then travel long distances on their day-off. This agrees with GM's findings a long time ago that 80% of the trips are within 40 miles. The other findings which was not discussed much is that 99% of the trips are within 100 miles. So if we could have a Chevy Volt with 100 mile EV Range, these new owners would most likely hit 99% of their trips in EV mode.

But of course consumer preferences and perception is different than statistics. So what is your desired EV Range, considering that the longer the EV Range, the higher the price.
 

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It wont be much more than 80 miles at best, that is enough to max the CARB ZEV credit. With the 2016 they went for over 50 mile AER to get the max of 2 credits, but for next gen it will max at 1.3 credits so there is little incentive for them to increase AER unless people are willing to pay for it. My guess is they don't increase it much at all.

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/zevtutorial/zev_tutorial_webcast.pdf
 

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It wont be much more than 80 miles at best, that is enough to max the CARB ZEV credit. With the 2016 they went for over 50 mile AER to get the max of 2 credits, but for next gen it will max at 1.3 credits so there is little incentive for them to increase AER unless people are willing to pay for it. My guess is they don't increase it much at all.

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/zevtutorial/zev_tutorial_webcast.pdf
Of course, the higher the EV Range, the higher the price. But with battery tech changing, the trend is the same price for a lot longer range. Besides, GM would be making profit with the Chevy Volt and the Chevy Bolt by now. The ZEV credits are now immaterial.
 

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It wont be much more than 80 miles at best, that is enough to max the CARB ZEV credit. With the 2016 they went for over 50 mile AER to get the max of 2 credits, but for next gen it will max at 1.3 credits so there is little incentive for them to increase AER unless people are willing to pay for it. My guess is they don't increase it much at all.

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/zevprog/zevtutorial/zev_tutorial_webcast.pdf
Yep, I'm thinking 70 is a good guess. A 70 mile EPA range would likely max the # of ZEV credits a PHEV can grab under current CARB regs. I believe the metric they use to determine how many credits a plug-in receives is loosely equivalent to the EPA city cycle for range testing.
 

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I'd love to have 75 miles of battery. That would give me 50 miles in the Minnesota winter, making probably 95% of my driving electric (excluding those lovely ERDTT days, of course!)
 

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Of course, the higher the EV Range, the higher the price.
Exactly.

And higher weight.

And more space taken away from the cabin.

Everyone would like more range, but it's a balancing act / trade-off. Range/cost/weight/space. Improvements in battery density and cost will help reduce those trade-offs tho.

GM did a great job improving range from Gen 1 to Gen 2 by 39% while only increasing battery capacity by 12%, but most of that came from larger %SOC window and a more efficient vehicle design. It will be harder to make similar incremental improvements on top of Gen 2.
 

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Of course, the higher the EV Range, the higher the price. But with battery tech changing, the trend is the same price for a lot longer range. Besides, GM would be making profit with the Chevy Volt and the Chevy Bolt by now. The ZEV credits are now immaterial.
They aren't immaterial, and they will surely optimize to maximize profit. I don't know exactly what number that is. Also remember that federal credits will be gone by then. My guess is they kill the Volt and replace it with lower range Voltec models or maybe turn it into a REx, so EV range is more than gas range, which gets more credits. The issue I see is that they seem to have to offer heavy discounts to move the Volt in large numbers. Maybe they just leave it largely unchanged and work more on cost reductions. I don't imagine they update it for a couple more years, and the electrified vehicle market is set to change dramatically by then.
 

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Exactly.

And higher weight.

And more space taken away from the cabin.

Everyone would like more range, but it's a balancing act / trade-off. Range/cost/weight/space. Improvements in battery density and cost will help reduce those trade-offs tho.

GM did a great job improving range from Gen 1 to Gen 2 by 39% while only increasing battery capacity by 12%, but most of that came from larger %SOC window and a more efficient vehicle design. It will be harder to make similar incremental improvements on top of Gen 2.
Given what we've seen them accomplish with the Bolt's battery, I would think a 75 mile EV range Gen 3 Volt, with less cost, less weight, and more cabin space than the Gen 2 Volt, is entirely achievable. And I would buy one too, since I won't be ready for both of the vehicles in our household to be BEV's yet!
 

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I didn't vote because what I really want is a larger (ie Malibu) sized vehicle with the Voltec drive system. I've lived with a Gen1 for the past 6 years and have no real issues with it as far as range goes. Sure it would be nice to have a slightly longer range, but a mid-sized 4 door with something in the 40-60 mi range would suit me just fine.

Oh yeah, and please add a POWER DRIVER'S SEAT WITH 2 MEMORY POSITIONS. Really, please.

VIN # B0985
 

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I would think that GM would keep the range about 50 miles, and focus more on reducing weight and cost.
I'd much rather have a $30k, 50 mile Volt than a $35k 75 mile Volt.
 

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I think there's four fundamental ways to go:
(0) Ditch the Volt and focus more on BEV and high-end PHEV
(1) Ditch the Volt and put plugs across the line-up
(2) Use incremental improvements in batteries to improve price, efficiency and packaging.
(3) use incremental improvements in batteries to increase capacity, range and charging rate.

I don't think they'll do option 0, but might do option 1. However, I expect one more Volt generation.

I think that option 2 would give the biggest overall gain and that's what I want to see. The tax credit will not be around for the next generation and the base price needs to fall significantly.
 

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I think there's four fundamental ways to go:
(0) Ditch the Volt and focus more on BEV and high-end PHEV
(1) Ditch the Volt and put plugs across the line-up
(2) Use incremental improvements in batteries to improve price, efficiency and packaging.
(3) use incremental improvements in batteries to increase capacity, range and charging rate.

I don't think they'll do option 0, but might do option 1. However, I expect one more Volt generation.

I think that option 2 would give the biggest overall gain and that's what I want to see. The tax credit will not be around for the next generation and the base price needs to fall significantly.
+1

Because everything is subjective, even the word "NEXT" Volt could mean MY18 or the Gen3...GM increased the Gen1s range what, 3 times? I could see the same happening for the MY18, I could also see GM giving the Volt the Bolt EVs LG Chem cells if they get savings...

The elephant in the room with the Gen3 Volt, if they even create one, is high odds the federal tax credit will be gone...I believe they would be better off to get the MSRP to $29,995 even if that means not increasing the range vs putting 100 miles of range into the thing and charging $40K...
 

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My first impulse was to select 75. I then realized that I wanted both my cake and to eat it, too. I selected >100 with range-extender backup (EREV). Why not? I'm driving a 2014 with the 2015 battery and infrequently travel locally beyond the range of the battery. But, if I could have a Volt in the future that exceeded 100 on battery with a range extender for my cross-country trips, that would be the best!
 

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I always felt that combining the GEN I LEAF and Volt would hit the "sweet spot" for range of an EREV.

Once you go above 75 miles range I think you are adding a significant cost increase for only a small percentage of potential buyers.

Volt stats is becoming a smaller percentage of Volt owners. (I'm no longer on there) The percentage of Volt stat drivers commuting over 75 miles may not represent the percentage of Volt owners/buyers as a whole...
 

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I think there's four fundamental ways to go:
(0) Ditch the Volt and focus more on BEV and high-end PHEV
(1) Ditch the Volt and put plugs across the line-up
(2) Use incremental improvements in batteries to improve price, efficiency and packaging.
(3) use incremental improvements in batteries to increase capacity, range and charging rate.

I don't think they'll do option 0, but might do option 1. However, I expect one more Volt generation.

I think that option 2 would give the biggest overall gain and that's what I want to see. The tax credit will not be around for the next generation and the base price needs to fall significantly.
As far as (1)....

I would be fine with replacing the Volt with the Cruze EREV, and then adding Malibu, Equinox and other EREV and BEV models.

We are still in the very early stages, so lets see where this goes...
 

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It is likely that there won't be a next gen Volt because all vehicles in the lineup will be PHEV or EV.

I need something taller and bigger, so, a plus-size Bolt luxury CUV would be my next need. I don't expect to be traveling >200mi by car after I'm 70. The new Cadillac program where you can get any car at any time could be an option.

Should have options:
- full autonomy keeping ability to drive myself if I want.
- power seats with maybe power egress (seat turns towards the door opening).
- seats, mirrors, cameras, cup holders and steering wheel have heat/cool as appropriate.
- outside mirrors are cameras or fully retracting conventional mirrors.
- doors move out of the way totally. Like a slider on a van. Maybe a retractable awning for rain/snow.
- all other lux such as killer audio, refrigerator with ice/water dispenser. Since drinking and driving won't be an issue, why not a bar?
- bio-defense cabin air filtering.
- voice control more like Siri or Alexa. But better.
- medical telemetry interface. Make sure I'm still breathing and beating. If I'm 'under the weather', don't let me drive.
- decent acceleration. Maybe 0-60 in 5.8 sec.
- range > 200 mi (normal will probably be 400mi by then. I'm talking 2023 or so.) with 80% recharge in < 15mins. Or a fuel cell backup.
- optional 3-rows of two-seat (6-passenger) seating. Aforementioned sliding doors would allow full access to all rows.
 

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My first impulse was to select 75. I then realized that I wanted both my cake and to eat it, too. I selected >100 with range-extender backup (EREV). Why not? I'm driving a 2014 with the 2015 battery and infrequently travel locally beyond the range of the battery. But, if I could have a Volt in the future that exceeded 100 on battery with a range extender for my cross-country trips, that would be the best!
Why not?
Because then you end up with an i3
 

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About a 30kv pack would be great. I found after living with my volt for a couple months now I drive more than I thought and my miles/kWh are really bad going home on my commute. I use all 14.1 kW every day. Turns out I need more than 10kwh to make the drive home from the office.
While I like the volt, knowing what I know now I would have waited and bought a bolt and something with an ic engine to replace our two Tdi's. While we may still get a Bolt as a second replacement, we have to have one car capable of longer drives that current ev technology allows. Places are a long way apart here in co along with hills, cold and high speeds all make it tough to go full ev.
 

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Why not?
Because then you end up with an i3
I'm glad you brought up the i3.

Cuz as much as the i3 REx has been maligned due to its under-powered engine and comically under-sized gas tank, there's little reason why a vehicle similar to the i3 REx couldn't be made vastly more practical with:
  1. a slightly more powerful engine
  2. a few more gallons of capacity added to the gas tank
  3. updated controls to add something similar to a Hold or Mountain mode to give ample battery buffer for high-power driving
Most of the i3 REx's main functional deficiencies are due to compliance with short-sighted CARB rules/incentives for "BEVx" vehicles that purposefully cripple the vehicle's performance and usability when running on gas by limiting gas tank size and outlawing Hold/Mountain modes. There's no reason BMW or any other automaker couldn't make a ~100mile EV with a small, lightweight engine (with just a bit more power than the i3) that could handle 99+% of driving scenarios.
 
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