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"Now, here's the rub: Reports suggest the Volt can make it through the EPA test cycle -- which from 2008 includes high speed running, air conditioning load, and cold start tests in addition to the city and highway cycles -- with the internal combustion engine running about 15 percent of the time.

The straightforward calculation gives the Volt an EPA fuel consumption rating somewhere north of 100mpg. But the EPA apparently wants to certify the Volt differently, insisting it finishes the test with the batteries close to full charge. That drops the calculated fuel consumption to just under 48mpg, because the internal combustion engine has to be run to replenish the batteries."

http://blogs.motortrend.com/6293345/government/could-the-epa-cripple-the-chevy-volt/index.html
 

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That's more stubborn / stupid than nuts, but it's also hearsay very early in the process, so it remains to be seen how the EPA will eventually rate mileage for EREVs.
 

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You can never under estimate the average intellegence of a beuraucratic Federal agency. Given a simple set of guidelines they will come up with the least logical and stupidest solution to almost any situation presented to them.
 

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Administratium Akin to Beuraucracy

New chemical Element Discovered

by William DeBuvitz

This bit of humor was written in April 1988 and appeared in the January 1989 issue of The Physics Teacher. William DeBuvitz is a physics professor at Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey (USA). He retired in June of 2000.

The heaviest element known to science was recently discovered by investigators at a major U.S. research university. The element, tentatively named administratium, has no protons or electrons and thus has an atomic number of 0. However, it does have one neutron, 125 assistant neutrons, 75 vice neutrons and 111 assistant vice neutrons, which gives it an atomic mass of 312. These 312 particles are held together by a force that involves the continuous exchange of meson-like particles called morons.
Since it has no electrons, administratium is inert. However, it can be detected chemically as it impedes every reaction it comes in contact with. According to the discoverers, a minute amount of administratium causes one reaction to take over four days to complete when it would have normally occurred in less than a second.

Administratium has a normal half-life of approximately three years, at which time it does not decay, but instead undergoes a reorganization in which assistant neutrons, vice neutrons and assistant vice neutrons exchange places. Some studies have shown that the atomic mass actually increases after each reorganization.

Research at other laboratories indicates that administratium occurs naturally in the atmosphere. It tends to concentrate at certain points such as government agencies, large corporations, and universities. It can usually be found in the newest, best appointed, and best maintained buildings.

Scientists point out that administratium is known to be toxic at any level of concentration and can easily destroy any productive reaction where it is allowed to accumulate. Attempts are being made to determine how administratium can be controlled to prevent irreversible damage, but results to date are not promising. :)
 

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"Now, here's the rub: Reports suggest the Volt can make it through the EPA test cycle -- which from 2008 includes high speed running, air conditioning load, and cold start tests in addition to the city and highway cycles -- with the internal combustion engine running about 15 percent of the time.

The straightforward calculation gives the Volt an EPA fuel consumption rating somewhere north of 100mpg. But the EPA apparently wants to certify the Volt differently, insisting it finishes the test with the batteries close to full charge. That drops the calculated fuel consumption to just under 48mpg, because the internal combustion engine has to be run to replenish the batteries."

http://blogs.motortrend.com/6293345/government/could-the-epa-cripple-the-chevy-volt/index.html

The problem I see is the car isn't designed to operate in that manner so the EPA rating will be ARTIFICIALLY TOO LOW. Sort of like making the vehicle idle overnight before taking a trip. Doesn't work that way.
 

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This is silly. Why don't they just calculate the mileage for when the car runs on gasoline and post that?

Then you could have a chart that factors in the battery based on how many miles you drive in an average day. Then a person could look at the chart for their commute or driving habits and get a guess. For example:

MPG (gasoline only): A City, B Hwy, C

MPG (with battery). Length of trip:

0-40 = n/a
40-50 = x
50-60 = y
60-70 = z
etc.
 

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So the Volt exploits a loophole in the "all-new and improved" EPA test procedure that they spent years of tax dollars to develop that was supposedly required to make sure the tests are more fair, accurate, and more representative of actual realized economy. So what!

You can bet when they test a Prius or an HEV Escape they start with a fully charged battery and they should do the same with the Volt!! If it gets 200mpg after an identical test cycle then THAT's what they should put on the sticker!!

I have visions of brush-cut, black spectacled EPA goofs in white smocks looking at their clip-boards going.... WTF??
:)
WopOnTour
 
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