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Anyone in québec could point where we can get an electricity monitor?

I would like to get some real data about electricity consumption when the volt is plug-in.
 

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254$........... I was looking for something below 20$, once i get data after a week I will probably get enough data maybe I will repeat this summer then...
 

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Like Loboc said, I just log into myvolt.com and download the data from there. It measures actual power pulled from the wall, not the power stored to the battery. This means there is no need to apply efficiency corrections or otherwise manipulate the data. It's already accurate. The only downside is that it does batch uploads from the car to the Onstar servers once per day so you can't get real-time data. That's not really a big deal to me. Once I have the CSV file downloaded, I use Excel to crunch it into graphical form for trend analysis. This requires a bit of custom programming work to get daily summaries because the data comes in with a new line for every time you plug in the cord which could mean as many as 6 lines of data per day for me.
 

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www.roulezelectrique.com can be contacted, check at the website. There is an article about Jacques Duval
recharging plug for his Tesla S. This article shows the meter (which is approved in Canada and in the US).

They sell 240V watt-hour meters for around $120, which is the setup of Mr. Duval, and
which is of lower cost that the EKM product, which usually melts at 12Amps sustained charging.

I hope this helps,

Francois Boucher
B2653
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Like Loboc said, I just log into myvolt.com and download the data from there. It measures actual power pulled from the wall, not the power stored to the battery. This means there is no need to apply efficiency corrections or otherwise manipulate the data. It's already accurate. The only downside is that it does batch uploads from the car to the Onstar servers once per day so you can't get real-time data. That's not really a big deal to me. Once I have the CSV file downloaded, I use Excel to crunch it into graphical form for trend analysis. This requires a bit of custom programming work to get daily summaries because the data comes in with a new line for every time you plug in the cord which could mean as many as 6 lines of data per day for me.
I saw my volt stats, but i was not sure if this take in account all the electricity.

So if I understand right.......if the car is plug for a week but not use, i should have 5 lines from My volts stats? This should give me how much KwH is being use to maintain the car.
 

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I saw my volt stats, but i was not sure if this take in account all the electricity.

So if I understand right.......if the car is plug for a week but not use, i should have 5 lines from My volts stats? This should give me how much KwH is being use to maintain the car.
Hmmm.... Interesting question. I've never gone 2 days without using my car so I can't rightly say. I just downloaded my most recent record and looked for a day of non-use and couldn't find one. I also discovered that when you download the last 12 months worth, it just gives monthly totals. This means that you need to download and save the CSV file on a regular basis or you will lose the fine-grained details that are more than a month old.
 

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http://www.amazon.ca/P3-International-P4400-Kill-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU

There is this but I don't know how long I would run a 12a charge through it. Also it won't do a level 2 charge. Which is why I suggested the first one.
PLEASE BE CAREFUL! Use caution with these Kill-A-Watt units. If you search this forum for Kill-A-Watt... You will find photos of a Volt owners who tried this device and it MELTED. (More than one.)

In my Opinion... This inexpensive device is not capable of safely monitoring a 12 amp load for a prolonged period of time. It might work for an hour or so... But I would NOT leave it unattended. (Especially if it's an older unit.)

The Volt does tell you an accurate measurement of how many kw/h are used EACH time it charges. You can see the numbers on the charge information screen on the center console.

There is no "cheap" data logging system that will safely monitor a Volt charger that I am aware of. The Kill-A-Watt is just not safe to use without some caution. You may find some people on this foam who disagree... But I am an engineer and I have seen how the internal component of the Kill-A-Watt are constructed. (I have owned 3 of them...) The device is just not designed to handle a 12 amp load for twelve hours a night.

This is a typical example of what you risk when you overload an outlet that has old tarnished contacts with weak spring tension:



I recommend using a hospital grade outlet for the Volt's L1 EVSE to avoid this type of overheating. I might suggest:

Cooper GFCI VGFH15
Cooper 8200_M

You might want to read this thread on charging FAQ:

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?48937-120V-Charging-FAQ&highlight=charging+faq

Stay safe.
 

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I've been running 12A through it (Kill-a-watt) since 2011 and never had a problem.
You are lucky... I have seen more than one MELTED Kill-A-Watt photos on this forum posted by other Volt owners. I would never leave one plugged in overnight. (Unless I was there to monitor it's temperature.) It's just not safe. I don't think the quality of the receptacle & current shunt are of sufficient quality to supply 12 amps for 12 hours a night without significant heat build up. You might have been lucky so far...

Please be careful. If it's getting warm. Don't use it.
 

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I note the date on the photo above is 2006, obviously before any Volt was sold or produced. (Just trying to avoid alarming anyone...)
 

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I note the date on the photo above is 2006, obviously before any Volt was sold or produced. (Just trying to avoid alarming anyone...)
It's just a photo showing a typical example of what CAN happen if you overload ANY outlet. Not specifically a Volt incident. If you want to see a specific photo of an outlet melted by a Volt EVSE you can see one in this excellent & helpful FAQ page posted by a moderator of this Forum:

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?48937-120V-Charging-FAQ&highlight=charging+faq

I am certainly NOT saying the Volt is at fault. (Nor implying that Volts have any sort of safety issues.) But the L1 Volt EVSE does draw 12 amps continuously for 12 hours to charge. There have been a significant number of Volt owners that have discovered their home outlets are not up to the task. (And they do post pictures of melted plugs, outlets and connectors on this forum from time to time.) Many home outlets are fine for running a 7 amp vacuum cleaner for a few minutes... or a freezer that cycles on and off. But a Volt's EVSE draws continuous power for extended periods of time. If an outlet was connected using the "stab" connectors or the outlet has tarnished contacts or weak spring tension they can overheat. This happened so frequently Chevrolet decided to change the default setting on the 120 volt EVSE to automatically reset to 8 amps EACH time you plug it in on 2013 and newer models. If a Volt owner wants to charge at 12 amps he must now manually force the EVSE into the 12 amp setting each and every time he charges.

The Kill-A-Watt is a device that seems to work OK for taking measurements of devices that draw low current. Or devices that cycle on and off. (Like a fridge.) But if you plug a large load into Kill-A-Watt for a prolonged period of time... It may overheat and melt. Sure... If the unit is brand new and the contact springs are tight and there is no corrosion on the contacts... You might get by with charging a Volt and measuring the load without incident. But as the unit ages... You are likely to experience an overheated Kill-A-Watt.

All I am saying here is... Some owners of Volts, room air conditioners and space heaters have reported issues with Kill-A-Watt units overheating from the loads. I would suggest that if you are using a Kill-A-Watt unit that you check it frequently for heat. If the plug feels hot after a few hours of use... Don't continue to use it. Or it could melt the Kill-A-Watt. Or it could melt the outlet that the Kill-A-Watt is pugged into. Or it could melt the plug on your $500 Voltec EVSE.

The photo is just an example of what CAN happen to ANY outlet if it is not in good condition. Volt owners need to be especially diligent about the condition of the outlet they are using for the 120 volt Voltec EVSE if it is being used at the 12 amp setting. And I use every opportunity to point this out to new owners. Just like the moderator who posted this helpful FAQ: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?48937-120V-Charging-FAQ&highlight=charging+faq
 
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