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This has never happened with our 2016 Volt Premier, with nearly 47,000 miles and over 16,000 miles of that just
on the gas engine.

So, we returned from vacation from Wallowa Co. Oregon after 4 days with our Volt, nearly 1,300 miles. We never plugged in the entire trip and just used the electric from the full charge when we left home.

We were up in the Wallowa Mountains above Hells Canyon on the Snake River 6,000 + feet. On the decents down to the river the Volt charged up to 3 bars on the battery, 15-17 miles) and I placed in hold at the bottom and saved that electric generated. We had already used our full battery from home charging (54 miles). I did this a few times on our vacation.

So after we arrived home I charged with our level two charging and in the morning, 082818, 88 miles were on the electric range gauge. I thought it was a glitch. Now today, 083018, my wife took the Volt to work, 16 miles one way. She arrived and there is still 65 miles of range left, and 81 % battery showing. Normally she would have 50-55 miles left in these summer conditions.

I am sure this is a glitch but I have never seen this before. The highest I have seen the electric range after a full charge is 76 miles or so and that is after getting over 70 miles on a charge for a few trips.
 

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The few times you gained electric during regen probably caused a recalculation in the GOM estimate and "fooled" it into thinking it could go farther resulting in the higher estimate. I generally average 44-45 on my GOM (gen 1) but when I take a trip out of town I try to maximize the amount of regen I get through the mountains and when I get home I've had mine peg at the max 60 miles several times. All this is also without any intermediate charging while out of town. Have you taken this trip before? and if so, did you do anything different during your regen opportunities than other times? Weather may also have played a role as well as how heavy any climate control usage you may have used.
 

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No, this is the longest trip we ever too with our Volt. I'm sure its just a glitch but this weekend we are going out of town and we
will use the entire electric charge and will see how many KWH we get out of it....
 

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We were up in the Wallowa Mountains above Hells Canyon on the Snake River 6,000 + feet. On the decents down to the river the Volt charged up to 3 bars on the battery, 15-17 miles) and I placed in hold at the bottom and saved that electric generated. We had already used our full battery from home charging (54 miles). I did this a few times on our vacation.
"Hold" mode is designed to allow the driver the choice of when to use the grid power obtained by charging the car from the wall. In essence, it allows the driver to temporarily increase the battery state of charge at which the Volt "switches to gas" as long as some grid power remains in the battery.

Once you fully deplete your battery, there is no more "grid" power. It is no longer possible for Hold Mode to "preserve" grid power for use later. It still remains possible for downhill regen to recharge the battery, and when level terrain is reached, that regen will be used for battery-powered driving. And, of course, turning the car off and on over the course of a vacation when regen might or might not have increased the battery soc above the switch to gas point can play havoc with the computer tracking of electric vs gas miles...

You write that you had fully depleted your battery before you reached the portion of the vacation when you descended the mountain roads several times down to the river, each time charging up to three bars of power, at which point you placed your Volt in Hold Mode to save that generated electricity. Is it possible to engage Hold Mode if there is no grid power in the battery?

Did you turn the car off and back on again when you reached the bottom so that the computer would recognize the battery had power above the "switch to gas" point that could be "held?" I would expect use of that power to count as Electric Miles without increasing the kWh Used number, but your trip numbers seem to indicate normal ev numbers.

Perhaps your Volt’s computer is counting the miles you drove on that "held" downhill regen after the grid power ran out as Electric Miles in the full charge range estimate (i.e., the estimate is weighted for recent driving data), and that’s why the start of day estimate is higher than expected. The guesstimate is expecting you to obtain more regen than you normally do while driving far enough to deplete the battery.
 

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The few times you gained electric during regen probably caused a recalculation in the GOM estimate and "fooled" it into thinking it could go farther resulting in the higher estimate. I generally average 44-45 on my GOM (gen 1) but when I take a trip out of town I try to maximize the amount of regen I get through the mountains and when I get home I've had mine peg at the max 60 miles several times. All this is also without any intermediate charging while out of town. Have you taken this trip before? and if so, did you do anything different during your regen opportunities than other times? Weather may also have played a role as well as how heavy any climate control usage you may have used.
You speak of the max 60 miles ... which leads me to believe you are speaking of a Gen1 Volt. I used to be able to get my Gen1 (a.k.a. Sparky to my kids) to that estimated range on a weekly basis, and would actually get between 56 and 63 miles of EV driving. I've been unable to get Sparky to the 60 miles of estimated range even once this summer, after having the coolants flushed/refilled as per GM recommended service, and also having had the transmission drained/refilled (not flushed). Is there a chance that something happened in either of these processes that has caused this "decline" that I'm seeing? I'm not looking forward to winter if I'm only able to get 43 miles of estimated range when it's still relatively hot outside! As for my Gen2, I've had it show up to 74 miles of estimated range on multiple occasions, but since I don't drive it that often, I can't get it much past that value. Anyone have any suggestions as to why this might be? I've driven at least 44 miles of EV each of the past 9 days (while the estimated started at 31 miles on my first day of driving), and wonder if my estimated range will start to climb towards the 60 mile mark again soon? I realize the estimated range is just that ... an estimate based on previous drive cycles. I know I can also drive more EV miles when I start with a higher estimated range too. For example, if I start with 33 estimated, I might drive 39-44 miles on full EV, yet when I start with 55 estimated, I'll get 50-63 miles of actual EV driving. I would love to get my Gen1 back to having an estimated range of at least 50-55 miles! Any suggestions/words of wisdom would be welcomed and greatly appreciated.

On a side note, I did happen to check out the "efficiency" screen on my Gen1 while driving yesterday, and happened to notice that the KwH used will actually decrease when you're in regen mode. I'd never really paid attention to KwH used before, but found it interesting (yet understandable) that the power used would decrease upon regeneration driving. While driving down a fairly steep hill, the car was in regen mode, and the KwH used went from 3.3 to 2.8.
 

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every technology extracts a cost. 50 years ago internal combustion vehicles loaded the sky with choking smog, the culmination of the move from horses and horse drawn transportation which left cities cluttered with dead animals and mired in manure.
 
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