GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I just recently purchased the Ebusbar EVSE with the 3 prong NEMA 10-30 dryer plug. However, I'm currently on a rental property and cannot run any new 220V lines or do any electrical modifications. Because the Ebusbar is listed as being able to charge not only at Level 2, but also at Level 1 (110-120V), I was hoping to wire up a little adapter that would allow me to plug into a regular NEMA 5-15R, energizing the NEMA 10-30R to only 120V. However, I'm stumped on how to wire the NEMA 10-30R.

Normally, it's hot-hot-neutral for the dryer plug, so how would I wire it to achieve only 120V operation so that the Ebusbar can operate at Level 1 charging? hot-neutral-neutral? It's hard to know without cracking it open to look at the transformer, but maybe someone here has already wired it and knows how.

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,100 Posts
Why don't you just use the stock EVSE?

For a Nema 10-30 it's actually hot-hot-ground. There is no neutral. So you would just replace one of the hot legs with neutral and you're at 120V.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Good question! I do currently use the stock EVSE as my dedicated "home" charger, however my wife and I will visit my family who live far enough away to warrant an overnight stay, so I end up constantly packing up the travel charger and unpacking it over and over. This isn't a huge deal, but I figured that I might as well try and get the second EVSE I have (the Ebusbar) to work as a dedicated home charger, since I already have it, and the convenience would be great.

I found out from posting on another forum that a Nissan Leaf owner did exactly what I wanted to do, and it's exactly what you suggested. The Nissan Leaf owner simply wired the NEMA 10-30R as 'hot-neutral-ground', and he was good to go.

Thanks for your input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Why don't you just use the stock EVSE?

For a Nema 10-30 it's actually hot-hot-ground. There is no neutral. So you would just replace one of the hot legs with neutral and you're at 120V.
A NEMA 10-30 is hot-hot-neutral. No safety ground. That is why 10-series receptacles have not been allowed in new construction for the past 20 years. With the neutral, it allows appliances that need both 120v and 240v to be plugged in. (For example an electric oven would use 240v for the heating elements, but might use 120v for the timer circuits.) Its modern replacement is a 14-30 - which does have a safety ground.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top