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Hi there,
I’ve driven Bolt in L mode, it will slow down and eventually fully stop without hitting the break paddle. However, for my 2018 volt, it cannot fully stop in L mode until I hit the break paddle.
Is there any advanced setting to make volt fully stop in L mode?

Thanks
 

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That has been discussed many times on this forum, with a quick search (above right).

No, the Volt regen paddle will let off at about 2km/h and not bring the car to a full stop - you must use the brake pedal to do so. There is no setting to change this.
 

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creep mode ?
 

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As others have said, the Volt in L (or using the re-gen paddle) will slow the car to about 2mph at which point the car will just roll. You need to put your foot on the brake to stop the car completely.
 

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One pedal driving is not offered in the Volt. Sorry.
 

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The one-pedal driving in the Bolt is nice, we use it all the time. For our Volt, the brake pedal is needed, there are no advanced Volt settings to add the Bolt's capability.
 

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D and L (and the paddle) are settings for degrees of regenerative braking. By its very nature, it requires the car to be moving to create the "braking" effect, and cannot therefore keep a stopped car from moving in the same way the friction braking system can. It cannot also actually "stop" a moving car. Outside forces will eventually stop any car coasting on level terrain, whether in Neutral, D, or L.

Friction braking slows down and eventually stops the vehicle’s wheels from rotating, thereby stopping the car. Regenerative braking uses the rotation of the wheels to crank a generator to create electricity. When engaged while the car is coasting (i.e., foot off the accelerator, not in Neutral), the cranking of the generator consumes the car’s kinetic energy, effectively slowing the car on level terrain, and reducing the effect of gravity on downward sloping terrain.

Regenerative braking uses the momentum of the car to slow it down, and on friendly terrain it may even be able to slow the car enough to allow outside forces to bring the car to a stop. Perhaps the computer can be programmed to apply electric forces to the motor to stop the shaft from rotating when a minimum speed has been reached while regenerative braking is engaged, thereby stopping the car by preventing the wheels from rotating when appropriate terrain conditions allow this. Even the Bolt manual points out that "While driving on grades, One-Pedal Driving may not be able to bring the vehicle to a complete stop or hold the vehicle at a stop."
 

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They did it for the Bolt, but the Volt does not have one foot driving. It is a shock to go from the Bolt which stops in L to the volt which barely slowed down in comparison and does not stop. I am pretty sure GM could get the same programming in the Volt. Maybe the next gen.
 

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I wonder what else is going on here. The idea of regenerative stopping power has to come from motion. Without motion, there is no stopping power. So for L to come to a full stop, at some point they have to engage the friction brakes. Admittedly the Volt actually creeps, but the best you could hope for would be a slow roll (forward or back) if the friction brakes didn't come into the equation.
 

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I was actually thinking about this the other day. I wonder (apologies if someone has mentioned this elsewhere, I'll admit I never looked) if GM engineered the "artificial creeping" into the Volt because it does still have an ICE, and that's what people are used to when having a car with an ICE..

Though, to poke holes in my own theory, I don't think I've ever ran the battery down to such a degree that the ICE stayed on while I was stopped.. :confused:
 

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Though, to poke holes in my own theory, I don't think I've ever ran the battery down to such a degree that the ICE stayed on while I was stopped.. :confused:
It will never do that. Once the battery is technically depleted it keeps a reserve amount of battery left. Then the car will act like it has a start/stop system, where the car takes off on battery up to about 10-15 mph, and then the engine will kick in.
 

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Even though the Volt doesn't have full one pedal, I'm really bothered by the artificial creep, it's poorly executed. It should've just been a hold to prevent roll back. The car could easily use the feedback from the ABS encoders to put some torque on a grade to hold without rolling forward or back. It take a lot more brake to hold my Volt back at a stop than my other car (Subaru Outback). Seems like a liability for GM to build in a feature that basically make the car want to lunge into whatever is in front of it, even if your foot is on the brakes (or hand on the regen paddle).
 

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I wonder what else is going on here. The idea of regenerative stopping power has to come from motion. Without motion, there is no stopping power. So for L to come to a full stop, at some point they have to engage the friction brakes. Admittedly the Volt actually creeps, but the best you could hope for would be a slow roll (forward or back) if the friction brakes didn't come into the equation.
What the Bolt seems to do for this is not "apply friction brakes" but apply a balanced amount of reverse torque until the wheels stop turning, then applies torque, forward or backward as necessary, to prevent the vehicle from rolling due to road slope, wind, etc. Automatic hill-holding feature. It does take a little bit of power, to stay stopped, but not much in comparison to getting up to speed later.
 

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Even though the Volt doesn't have full one pedal, I'm really bothered by the artificial creep, it's poorly executed. It should've just been a hold to prevent roll back. The car could easily use the feedback from the ABS encoders to put some torque on a grade to hold without rolling forward or back. It take a lot more brake to hold my Volt back at a stop than my other car (Subaru Outback). Seems like a liability for GM to build in a feature that basically make the car want to lunge into whatever is in front of it, even if your foot is on the brakes (or hand on the regen paddle).
There is no connection between regen and ABS.
 
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