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The technology has been around for years, but the acceleration and implementation is moving at a such rapid pace, that the neither the public, or our law makers have considered the implications of the technology. Questions we need to ask ourselves, are, how many drivers will be displaced in the trucking and public transportation field and is worth the cost benefit human from reductions of accidents. How can we safeguard the technology from being hacked bringing our transportation system to a standstill, I know here in NJ we don't Need hackers for it we have chris christy. But these things do need to be considered before we allow this technology on the street in any real numbers. Once again the technology is outpacing any thoughtful discussion in this area.
 

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Questions we need to ask ourselves, are, how many drivers will be displaced in the trucking and public transportation field and is worth the cost benefit human from reductions of accidents.
The change won't be overnight so there will be plenty of time during the transition for them to find other work. Workers in the horse and buggy industry adapted so will truckers. As to the costs of accidents, what about the savings in human lives? Thats way more important than the cost of bent metal and broken glass.

The hacking concerns are valid but we have several systems operating now, like the airline industry guidance systems for example, that fall under the same thing.
 

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This concept is more practical because most bus transports have fixed routes, so it only needs to manage obstacles on the route. It should also have all the stops preprogrammed, and detect all passengers getting in and out. Much more simple than a regular self-driving passenger car!
 

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The change won't be overnight so there will be plenty of time during the transition for them to find other work. Workers in the horse and buggy industry adapted so will truckers. As to the costs of accidents, what about the savings in human lives? Thats way more important than the cost of bent metal and broken glass.

The hacking concerns are valid but we have several systems operating now, like the airline industry guidance systems for example, that fall under the same thing.
Boy how cavalier you are with people's livelihood to say they can easily find new jobs. It appears that there is 20% unemployment among males in this country. The vast majority who happen to of color, some of this is do to current how we view those who served in prison this will only be acerbated by herr frumpf and his new administration. What needs to be done is a national discussion on the matter, and should we go this way we certainly will need to build programs for those who will be displaced. I should also add that those are only three questions, in order for traffic to run more efficiently an investment in smart signals and smart roadways need to be considered, the cost benefit needs to be discussed, as well as each country will need to decide on local content on the vehicles being made. As for the horse and buggy argument thats a red herring as in the fact that we were, as was most of the world an agrarian economy, with in reality very little infrastructure and employment in the horse and buggy era. Whereas, there are over 200,000 truckers alone in this country. A very disingenuous argument.
 

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Cavalier? No. Pragmatic? Yes. I have both friends and a family member who drive trucks for a living. I was in the journalism field and have watched it die over the last 15 years due to the internet.

Do you still see large offices full of accountants cranking numbers on manual adding machines? No. One mainframe does it. Or a room full of telephone operators? No, one voicemail system does it. etc. etc etc. If automated trucks are cheaper and more efficient than human drivers, companies will switch.
 

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Helsinki launching self-driving bus into regular service

http://www.metro-magazine.com/technology/news/722918/helsinki-launching-self-driving-bus-into-regular-service

The Finnish capital of Helsinki plans to launch a new bus line operated with one self-driving bus to start operation in the fall of 2017. The introduction of Helsinki RoboBusLine represents a shift from an experimental phase to regular, scheduled public transit service with self-driving buses.

Paving the way for RoboBus, two driverless minibuses have been tested in real traffic conditions in Helsinki and other Finnish cities since summer 2016, and these test runs will continue in Helsinki in summer 2017.

The Sohjoa project launched two EasyMile EZ10 electric minibuses in Helsinki's Hernesaari waterfront district in mid-August 2016 to carry passengers on a straight quarter-mile course on a public street. With an operator on board in case of an emergency, the buses traveled at 7 mph, learning the route and accruing knowledge about autonomous bus operation. Sohjoa is an EU-financed joint project by the six largest cities of Finland, Finnish universities, and transportation authorities to prepare for new public transit services and autonomous vehicles.


After the Helsinki debut, Sohjoa self-driving bus trials have continued in the Finnish cities of Espoo and Tampere, to resume in Helsinki for July to August 2017, when the buses will shuttle passengers in Helsinki's Mustikkamaa recreational island to Helsinki Zoo.


Self-driving buses could offer a solution to the last mile of public transit in Helsinki — taking riders from a regular public transit stop to their homes. Automated, remote-controlled bus service could markedly reduce the costs of the last-mile service and improve access to public transit. The ultimate goal is to increase public transit use and so to reduce cars and needs to drive in the city.

 

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The way many of the bus drivers in Denver drive I think our streets would be far safer with driverless busses.
 

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The change won't be overnight so there will be plenty of time during the transition for them to find other work. Workers in the horse and buggy industry adapted so will truckers. As to the costs of accidents, what about the savings in human lives? Thats way more important than the cost of bent metal and broken glass.

The hacking concerns are valid but we have several systems operating now, like the airline industry guidance systems for example, that fall under the same thing.
The transition from horse and buggy to ICE didn't eliminate the need for a driver. It did change the skills needed. Driverless busses eliminate the need. This is not a valid analogy.
 

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Most likely, automated heavy trucking will still require a driver at the wheel for safety to take over in case a situation arises that the automation is not handling correctly, or to do specialized work like backing into a tricky loading dock, or truck maintenance and inspections, etc. A driver will also have to be present to handle the paperwork associated with cargo delivery. In fact, there is quite a bit of paperwork that truckers are responsible for with the logs, weigh stations, changing pickup and delivery orders, etc. that they currently struggle to find time to complete. Also there is a current shortage of drivers and rising demand. So automation won't make drivers unemployed, but more likely will change the nature of their work, eliminate the most mundane aspects, and possibly make them more productive and safer.

A model for this is the airline pilot. Most of the flying of an airliner has been taken over by the auto pilot, even including the landing in some cases, but airline pilots are still employed and there are more than ever.
 

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Boy how cavalier you are with people's livelihood to say they can easily find new jobs. It appears that there is 20% unemployment among males in this country. The vast majority who happen to of color, some of this is do to current how we view those who served in prison this will only be acerbated by herr frumpf and his new administration. What needs to be done is a national discussion on the matter, and should we go this way we certainly will need to build programs for those who will be displaced. I should also add that those are only three questions, in order for traffic to run more efficiently an investment in smart signals and smart roadways need to be considered, the cost benefit needs to be discussed, as well as each country will need to decide on local content on the vehicles being made. As for the horse and buggy argument thats a red herring as in the fact that we were, as was most of the world an agrarian economy, with in reality very little infrastructure and employment in the horse and buggy era. Whereas, there are over 200,000 truckers alone in this country. A very disingenuous argument.
Quick, let's take away tractors from farmers, computers from...everyone. ATM machines, credit cards, Amazon all must be abolished in the name of making work for unemployed males. Remove all automation, let's get back to the 1940's? 1800's? 1600's? :)
 
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