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I suffered a blow out on a 19000 miles 2016 volt. OEM tire But my car has no hand crank to lift it off the dead tire and doesn’t come with wrench thing to remove the nuts! This is crazy that I have to wave down a small car to remove the tire. Is this normal for volt not to include any of the lift or the wrench? Or did my dealer took this on their last tire rotation?
 

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Pretty typical these days with most cars, no spare and no jack. They just give you a compressor and some goop to plug the leak but neither will help with a blowout.
 

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Pretty typical these days with most cars, no spare and no jack. They just give you a compressor and some goop to plug the leak but neither will help with a blowout.
Do you have a 2016 volt were you can check the compartment in the back and see if it comes with it? I can see the styrofoam indent that looks like it’s for the hand crank stuff but of course it’s empty.
 

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I suffered a blow out on a 19000 miles 2016 volt. OEM tire But my car has no hand crank to lift it off the dead tire and doesn’t come with wrench thing to remove the nuts! This is crazy that I have to wave down a small car to remove the tire. Is this normal for volt not to include any of the lift or the wrench? Or did my dealer took this on their last tire rotation?
No, if you are the original owner your Volt would have come with a tire inflator kit under the hatch floor (inside a nylon case) that included a small 12V air pump and a canister of tire sealant (goop.) Chevrolet does sell a space saver spare tire kit for the Volt at an additional cost. The manual covers how to use the sealant and inflator pump to seal a small tire tread leak. This cannot be used in the event of a sidewall puncture or blowout. The New Volt Owners forum here has extensive information on how to put together your own spare tire kit at about 1/3rd to 1/2 the cost of the factory spare tire kit.
 

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No Volt has ever come with a jack, lug wrench or spare tire.

I bought a Cruze jack (also doubles as a lug wrench) and store it in the space provided under the cargo floor.

For my first long distance trip (Seattle to Houston) I also bought an extra wheel and tire to take in the car, but normally leave the spare wheel/tire in my garage.

I do carry a plug kit and have used it to repair a hole in the tire where all the air leaked out rapidly. That allowed me to get to a tire shop for a more thorough repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No Volt has ever come with a jack, lug wrench or spare tire.

I bought a Cruze jack (also doubles as a lug wrench) and store it in the space provided under the cargo floor.

For my first long distance trip (Seattle to Houston) I also bought an extra wheel and tire to take in the car, but normally leave the spare wheel/tire in my garage.

I do carry a plug kit and have used it to repair a hole in the tire where all the air leaked out rapidly. That allowed me to get to a tire shop for a more thorough repair.
what model did you have? Cause under the flood of my trunk, it has these imprint that looking like were jack is supposed to be. Yes I have the tire repair kit along with inflator but I got side wall ruptured...not sure if bumper to bumper warranty covers the OEM tire.
 

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Wow, that tire is toast! No amount of jacking and plugging will help that.

Everyone's Volt has an indent in the styrofoam for a jack. Go to an autoparts store and pick up a jack for a pinch weld lift point. Also, get yourself a lug wrench that will fit. And, get a tire patch repair kit. I got one that shoots rubber plugs. Make sure you got the air pump and goop canister. Don't use the goop, if you can patch the tire. Jacking up the car will help in plugging the tire.
what model did you have? Cause under the flood of my trunk, it has these imprint that looking like were jack is supposed to be. Yes I have the tire repair kit along with inflator but I got side wall ruptured...not sure if bumper to bumper warranty covers the OEM tire.
 

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what model did you have? Cause under the flood of my trunk, it has these imprint that looking like were jack is supposed to be. Yes I have the tire repair kit along with inflator but I got side wall ruptured...not sure if bumper to bumper warranty covers the OEM tire.
The OE tires are covered by GM for the first year of ownership, after that the tire manufacturer's warranty would apply.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow, that tire is toast! No amount of jacking and plugging will help that.

Everyone's Volt has an indent in the styrofoam for a jack. Go to an autoparts store and pick up a jack for a pinch weld lift point. Also, get yourself a lug wrench that will fit. And, get a tire patch repair kit. I got one that shoots rubber plugs. Make sure you got the air pump and goop canister. Don't use the goop, if you can patch the tire. Jacking up the car will help in plugging the tire.
what model did you have? Cause under the flood of my trunk, it has these imprint that looking like were jack is supposed to be. Yes I have the tire repair kit along with inflator but I got side wall ruptured...not sure if bumper to bumper warranty covers the OEM tire.
no I wasn’t looking to fix it but I need to remove the tire to get it for replacement, just can’t believe it doesn’t even have lug wrench or anything to help with removal.
 

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what model did you have? Cause under the flood of my trunk, it has these imprint that looking like were jack is supposed to be. Yes I have the tire repair kit along with inflator but I got side wall ruptured...not sure if bumper to bumper warranty covers the OEM tire.
The OE tires are covered by GM for the first year of ownership, after that the tire manufacturer's warranty would apply.
only for the first year? Was hoping for bumper to bumper warranty coverage, so you know how we can obtain the tire manufacturer’s warranty?
 

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I don't believe any tire damaged by a road hazard (as it appears this one was) is covered by the mfg's warranty (car or tire).


You can sometimes purchase a "tire care package" at an extra cost when you buy a car that would cover things like this, or a road hazard warranty/certificate when buying tires after getting your car - but in my experience, it's like buying 5 tires at the price of 4. So you'd need two of them to be replaced to come out ahead, and I've never seen the case where I'd personally come out ahead buying that coverage.
 

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Even if you have AAA you would be in a better situation if you had a space saver spare, scissor jack and lug wrench. The AAA service person can change the tire, takes less time than towing. Also, if you have a flat front tire the Volt Owner's Manual states that you should swap the flat tire for one of the rear tires before attempting to load the Volt onto a flatbed tow truck. Otherwise you risk damaging the front of the Volt as it is winched onto the flatbed. Having a spare tire with you skips the whole problem.
 

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It's well known that many cars today don't come with a spare or jack or lug wrench. Well known by many, but not by all obviously. You bought a car without knowing what's included, you never looked in the rear cargo storage area to see what did and did not come with the car, and never looked in the owner's manual.

Do you look under the front hood monthly as recommended by the owner's manual? If not, one of these days you may have another big surprise coming your way. Do you know how to jump a Volt correctly? Or jump another car from the Volt? Did you know there are also right and wrong ways to have a Volt towed? All owner's manual stuff.

If you threw away your owner's manual, there is a PDF version for download at the Chevy website.

Anyway, I bought my donut spare and scissor's jack at a local junk yard. $20 total. I keep them in my garage along with lug wrench, torque wrench, wheel chocks, and a second scissor's jack. In the car I keep a tire plug kit, needle nose pliers, plastic sheet, gloves.

If needed, I can have my spare tire brought to me or my car brought to my house. On a long road trip I can put the spare, etc. in the cargo area to minimize any blowout inconvenience. On the other hand, in 7 years and 97+k miles I have not had a tire incident.

I have details on spare tires for both Gen 1 and Gen 2 Volts in my FAQ's in the Newcomer's forum in case you want to get the right size, etc.
 

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Even if you have AAA you would be in a better situation if you had a space saver spare, scissor jack and lug wrench. The AAA service person can change the tire, takes less time than towing. Also, if you have a flat front tire the Volt Owner's Manual states that you should swap the flat tire for one of the rear tires before attempting to load the Volt onto a flatbed tow truck. Otherwise you risk damaging the front of the Volt as it is winched onto the flatbed. Having a spare tire with you skips the whole problem.
That's funny. I wonder what happens when the AAA guys shows up and you say - "Nope - has to be a flat bed". Then another one shows up and starts to hook up and you say "Nope. Have to rotate the tire first."

I already had my first flat and it held enough air to get to the station for a patch. Most of the time I can get somewhere for a patch. If you blow out the front, I don't know what the solution will be.

And you can't really run mismatched tires with this vehicle can you?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It's well known that many cars today don't come with a spare or jack or lug wrench. Well known by many, but not by all obviously. You bought a car without knowing what's included, you never looked in the rear cargo storage area to see what did and did not come with the car, and never looked in the owner's manual.

Do you look under the front hood monthly as recommended by the owner's manual? If not, one of these days you may have another big surprise coming your way. Do you know how to jump a Volt correctly? Or jump another car from the Volt? Did you know there are also right and wrong ways to have a Volt towed? All owner's manual stuff.

If you threw away your owner's manual, there is a PDF version for download at the Chevy website.

Anyway, I bought my donut spare and scissor's jack at a local junk yard. $20 total. I keep them in my garage along with lug wrench, torque wrench, wheel chocks, and a second scissor's jack. In the car I keep a tire plug kit, needle nose pliers, plastic sheet, gloves.

If needed, I can have my spare tire brought to me or my car brought to my house. On a long road trip I can put the spare, etc. in the cargo area to minimize any blowout inconvenience. On the other hand, in 7 years and 97+k miles I have not had a tire incident.

I have details on spare tires for both Gen 1 and Gen 2 Volts in my FAQ's in the Newcomer's forum in case you want to get the right size, etc.
FYI mine never included any owners manual it was just the app on the phone that I look over and it is a new car but my first GM as my family has always been a Toyota family. So I didn’t know what is included in GM and what isn’t. Apparently no lug wrench or jack or physical owners manual is one thing. Or any spare.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
inconvenience. On the other hand, in 7 years and 97+k miles I have not had a tire incident.

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17 years of driving and I have never have a blow out or a flat tire before! This is really a first flat and a total blow out. It’s my luck or it’s GM making cars with tires that just doesn’t stand up to road. But of course all my cars in the past were Toyota Prius and rav4 so it’s nothing to compared to GM.
 

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The OE Michelin EnergySaver A/S tire is a low rolling resistance (LRR) tire. The Michelin tire has stiffer but thinner sidewall construction than a conventional tire. The sidewall is reinforced with Kevlar fabric but is susceptible to damage from impact with curbs, pot holes and road debris.
 

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That's funny. I wonder what happens when the AAA guys shows up and you say - "Nope - has to be a flat bed".
You say, "I specifically requested a flat bed, based on the owner's manual towing instructions."

Then another one shows up and starts to hook up and you say "Nope. Have to rotate the tire first."
You say, "I specifically requested a flat bed, and that the driver come prepared to exchange the good rear wheel with the flat front, based on the owner's manual towing instructions."

This is what an educated consumer looks like.

I already had my first flat and it held enough air to get to the station for a patch. Most of the time I can get somewhere for a patch. If you blow out the front, I don't know what the solution will be.
I think the solution would be to plug the front tire with the the $5 tire plug kit you bought to keep in the car for situations like this. Or use the inflator goop after reading the directions.

If it's a sidewall blowout, that can't be repaired by any means. The solution there is a new tire. You either have the car towed to a tire dealer (I recommend Discount Tire), or worst case a dealer. Or, if you're me, you use the $10 donut spare you bought at the auto salvage yard with the $10 scissor's jack (and lug wrench, wheel chocks). Given I have a set of snow wheels as well, I could even use one of those temporarily while a new tire arrives.

When you get the new tire, mount it in the rear, not the front.

And you can't really run mismatched tires with this vehicle can you?
A donut spare is meant to be temporary. You use them for short duration, under 50MPH to get you to a place that can get a new tire installed.

Depending on the tire wear on the other 3, the rule of thumb is if the other 3 tires have lost only 2/32nds - 4/32nds tread, you can install a new tire of the same model for the 4th. When you get the new tire, mount it in the rear, not the front.

If the wear of the other three is greater than 4/32nds, you either buy 4 new tires or buy two new for the rear.

Mixing tires of different brands/models can be trickier. You'll need to use 2 of the same per axle. So you put two new on the rear. Mismatching this way can work. But eventually, you'll be buying 4 new tires because you'll no longer be able to rotate the tires as normal.

17 years of driving and I have never have a blow out or a flat tire before! This is really a first flat and a total blow out. It’s my luck or it’s GM making cars with tires that just doesn’t stand up to road. But of course all my cars in the past were Toyota Prius and rav4 so it’s nothing to compared to GM.
Bad luck it seems. Google "toyota tire blowout" and you'll find plenty of Toyota drivers with tire blowouts. My Volt OEM all season tires have almost 70k miles on them (over 8 years) and are due to be replaced before putting them back on in the spring. My other car (Bolt EV) has over a year an a half on it. No blowouts for either car. That's a total of 9-1/2 years on GM supplied tires with no blowouts. Not as long as your 17 years, but half way there.

Some feel the LRR tires from Goodyear, Michelin, Bridgestone, etc. are slightly more prone to puncture or blowout if you hit a curb or a deep pothole. Did you hit a curb or pothole? Potholes can kill tires of all makes. If not, it was likely road debris that nailed your tire. That's called bad luck.

The more miles you drive, the better the chances you could encounter road debris that takes out a tire, a radiator, something in the undercarriage, etc. Stuff happens.
 

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Mixing tires of different brands/models can be trickier. You'll need to use 2 of the same per axle. So you put two new on the rear. Mismatching this way can work. But eventually, you'll be buying 4 new tires because you'll no longer be able to rotate the tires as normal.
No but you can change them front to rear and rear to front. The fronts take the brunt of it because they are the driving and the steering tires. The rears are just along for the ride.


In the last 55 years of driving I never had a flat tire. I don't know if that was because a) the tires were thicker 70+ or last car 60 series b) the roads I travelled weren't that bad shape or c) lucky, didn't run over anything that caused air to be lost (did run over a screw that went into tire but didn't lose any pressure). The lower the series 55, 50, 45 the less area of compliance a tire has before damage to the tire and/or rim.
 
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