GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I recently totaled my 2013 Volt (not my fault). Most of the damage is up front, and it doesn't appear to be too deep - radiators will need to be replaced, etc. Charger module got scuffed, but it's probably fine. Steering wheel and knee airbags deployed. It looks like most of the crucial running gear is good and the frame isn't bent.
The loss claim is $15K and the salvage value is $3200. I'm really tempted to pay the $3200 and keep it as a project.
Q: Is this even *possible* to repair myself, or will I wind up like the guy who repaired a totaled Model S only to find Tesla wouldn't allow it to be re-activated? It is clear that some modules will need to be "serviced" and re-enabled to get the car to drive again. I'd love to hear of any DIY repair stories or links to similar threads. Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,424 Posts
There is zero chance you will beat the insurance company, they do this analysis for a living and have the lowest cost resources available.

Airbags alone are like 5-6K and the pricing on Volt specific parts start at 1K and go up from there each. Even if you put it all together for 15K, you could have just shopped around and found a better 2013 for less that wouldn't have a salvage title.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
I believe you would have to get GM to do something to the car to make it drivable again, not sure if they would be willing to do that. You would probably have to replace the airbags.

Also, what could be tempting is to use the battery for a conversion project, but again, might have to strip BMS and use your own to avoid compatibility issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
There is zero chance you will beat the insurance company, they do this analysis for a living and have the lowest cost resources available.

Airbags alone are like 5-6K and the pricing on Volt specific parts start at 1K and go up from there each. Even if you put it all together for 15K, you could have just shopped around and found a better 2013 for less that wouldn't have a salvage title.
I wouldn't say zero chance, but it's not going to be cheap, that's for sure.
There's been a couple people post on here about buying salvaged volts, but I don't think any of them have ever come back and said they finished, and the car is running.
You would need the dealer to reactivate the HV pack once the work is done, and they would probably want to charge you for some sort of inspection before they do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I wouldn't say zero chance, but it's not going to be cheap, that's for sure.
There's been a couple people post on here about buying salvaged volts, but I don't think any of them have ever come back and said they finished, and the car is running.
You would need the dealer to reactivate the HV pack once the work is done, and they would probably want to charge you for some sort of inspection before they do that.
Thanks. There seems to be a large discrepancy in people's estimated pricing for air bag replacement. I would want to do all the work on this that I could do myself and would be using salvaged parts wherever available - which would probably be most of the parts except for the airbags themselves. I don't think I'll need any electronics other than replacement crash sensors. The hardest part will likely be re-activating systems disabled in the crash.

P.S. While I appreciate informative responses, I'm not interested in "It'll never work" responses unless they're accompanied by *exact* failure points or references to other attempts and failures. Speculative responses do me no good and only waste everyone's time. Thanks all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
Thanks. There seems to be a large discrepancy in people's estimated pricing for air bag replacement. I would want to do all the work on this that I could do myself and would be using salvaged parts wherever available - which would probably be most of the parts except for the airbags themselves. I don't think I'll need any electronics other than replacement crash sensors. The hardest part will likely be re-activating systems disabled in the crash.

P.S. While I appreciate informative responses, I'm not interested in "It'll never work" responses unless they're accompanied by *exact* failure points or references to other attempts and failures. Speculative responses do me no good and only waste everyone's time. Thanks all!
As few have likely done this with a Volt, speculation is inevitable. Those insights probably should not be simply be disregarded. You're already speculating on what's broken and what's probably OK.

Good luck whatever you decide to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
As few have likely done this with a Volt, speculation is inevitable. Those insights probably should not be simply be disregarded. You're already speculating on what's broken and what's probably OK.

Good luck whatever you decide to do.
Thanks, I'm really just looking for specific answers to my relatively specific question:

"Q: Is this even *possible* to repair myself, or will I wind up like the guy who repaired a totaled Model S only to find Tesla wouldn't allow it to be re-activated? It is clear that some modules will need to be "serviced" and re-enabled to get the car to drive again. I'd love to hear of any DIY repair stories or links to similar threads. Thanks!! "

One of the reasons I took a long hiatus from gm-volt forums was the widespread prevalence of replies not addressing the OP's actual question. If the OP posted "Hi, I want to do A. How can I do A?", so many responses would be "Why would you want to do A??? Why not do B, or C?" It became extremely frustrating.

Anyway, I don't want to go off on that tangent - I'm just wondering: Is a DIY repair *possible*, and are there any success (or failure) stories? Nothing more. Not interested in hearing about the economics, etc. I just want hard and fast knowledge of whether it's *possible*. Thanks all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
Thanks, I'm really just looking for specific answers to my relatively specific question:

"Q: Is this even *possible* to repair myself, or will I wind up like the guy who repaired a totaled Model S only to find Tesla wouldn't allow it to be re-activated? It is clear that some modules will need to be "serviced" and re-enabled to get the car to drive again. I'd love to hear of any DIY repair stories or links to similar threads. Thanks!! "

One of the reasons I took a long hiatus from gm-volt forums was the widespread prevalence of replies not addressing the OP's actual question. If the OP posted "Hi, I want to do A. How can I do A?", so many responses would be "Why would you want to do A??? Why not do B, or C?" It became extremely frustrating.

Anyway, I don't want to go off on that tangent - I'm just wondering: Is a DIY repair *possible*, and are there any success (or failure) stories? Nothing more. Not interested in hearing about the economics, etc. I just want hard and fast knowledge of whether it's *possible*. Thanks all!
It's possible. Chevy won't play games with you, but you'll need their help with resetting a few things like airbags and such.

You might appreciate this thread - one of a few IIRC: http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?177842-Rebuilding-a-Salvage-Savage
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
Have you asked a Dealer (or GM) if they would be willing to reset things after repair?

At least that would answer the Tesla issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
The loss claim is $15K and the salvage value is $3200. I'm really tempted to pay the $3200 and keep it as a project.


Another forum member had success rebuilding a crashed Volt he purchased for $5k that seems to have had similar damage as you described. For those with short attention spans, jump to the 30min mark in order to see he now has the previously totaled Volt 'running'.~!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Mister Dave, smarti, and somms, that's some solid info. The repair video was really solid in terns of telling me what I need to look for in the car before I make my "salvage or not" decision. Looks definitely to be a big project, but with such low engine miles on the ride, and knowing how well I took care of it otherwise, it seems, even if I fail miserably, that I could probably at least recoup some of the $3200 by selling it back to salvage. Interestingly, I searched around youtube and didn't find much in the way of volt repair, and I didn't find the above video - so if anyone else knows of ongoing repair projects, please feel free to post 'em.
Thanks again everyone!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,464 Posts
To me, the car's components should be worth more than $3,200, but I wouldn't be looking to fix the Volt. I would use the parts and the battery to convert a donor car over to EV. That's just me, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Do you have pictures of damage to your Volt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,788 Posts
Any Volt certified dealer can re-program the computers etc. once you have replaced all the broken parts, etc. But it can ONLY be re-programmed by a Dealer with the proper equipment.

Check the seatbelts, because if they are jammed, you have to replace them and the pre-tensioners that jammed them, which costs close to $1000 for both front seats.
Headlights are about $500 each, and lower turn signal assemblies are about $150 each.
The complete radiator package costs about $500 aftermarket, $1000 from a dealer.
Radiator fan assembly costs about another $500, if broken/damaged.
Front bumper clip costs about $500, chrome grille about $250, hood about $500, paint another $500-$1500 depending on color.
Wiring harnesses are about $150 each, and there are several that could be damaged in the front.

Just so you know ahead of time what to expect. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Any Volt certified dealer can re-program the computers etc. once you have replaced all the broken parts, etc. But it can ONLY be re-programmed by a Dealer with the proper equipment.

Check the seatbelts, because if they are jammed, you have to replace them and the pre-tensioners that jammed them, which costs close to $1000 for both front seats.
Headlights are about $500 each, and lower turn signal assemblies are about $150 each.
The complete radiator package costs about $500 aftermarket, $1000 from a dealer.
Radiator fan assembly costs about another $500, if broken/damaged.
Front bumper clip costs about $500, chrome grille about $250, hood about $500, paint another $500-$1500 depending on color.
Wiring harnesses are about $150 each, and there are several that could be damaged in the front.

Just so you know ahead of time what to expect. :)
Great info! Thank you much SharkVolt! It all adds up - that's for sure. I'm going to inspect it again tomorrow at the salvage yard. If I see any crumple-zone action, then it's a definite no-go for me, but if the frame's still straight, then I might still give it a go. It's still a tough call. Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Find out what the title will look like if you buy it. If you can get them to NOT put "Salvage" on it, the car will be worth a lot more, after you fix it.

I don't know what the rules are for salvage vs. clean title, but they are not always consistently used. Push for a "clean" title.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
One thing I would be worried about down the road if you get it working again is the value of the car (If you may think about selling it some day). A salvage title or even an accident on the history report really hurts the value, especially for a complicated car like the Volt.

I haven't found a lot of guides on repairing the Volt. It also isn't a very common car, not a lot of parts cars available. It definitely looks like a big project.

Good luck on reviving your Volt!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,359 Posts
Hello, I recently totaled my 2013 Volt (not my fault). Most of the damage is up front, and it doesn't appear to be too deep - radiators will need to be replaced, etc. Charger module got scuffed, but it's probably fine. Steering wheel and knee airbags deployed. It looks like most of the crucial running gear is good and the frame isn't bent.
The loss claim is $15K and the salvage value is $3200. I'm really tempted to pay the $3200 and keep it as a project.
Q: Is this even *possible* to repair myself, or will I wind up like the guy who repaired a totaled Model S only to find Tesla wouldn't allow it to be re-activated? It is clear that some modules will need to be "serviced" and re-enabled to get the car to drive again. I'd love to hear of any DIY repair stories or links to similar threads. Thanks!!
Anything is "possible" if you have the money to throw at it. If $3,200 to keep the car is more than "casual pocket change" money to you then I'd take that amount and use it as a down payment on another car because you'll be going into uncharted territory trying to restore a crashed Volt and I have no doubt at all that you will find a lot of unpleasant surprises.

just my 2 cents worth.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top