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I am curious if anyone needed a brake pad replacement so far, oldest Volt being 10 years old.
If you did, I'd appreciate if you can give some info about your car and your driving habits. Like:

Year your car manufactured
Year you acquired it
Your average yearly mileage since you owned it
Your driving patterns (how much inner city, how much highway driving)
Anything else you think which might be useful

Thank you
2012 Volt purchase 12/31/2011. Currently has over 256,000 miles:

reversed front pads (flipped to counter the wedge wearing making them even) at 120k miles
replaced all brake pads and trurned all rotors (due to rust/corrosion) at 212k miles
replaced RR rotor due to brake caliper pin corrosion/frozen 220k miles
replaced LR rotor due to corrosion (chunk broke off)

I used to drive 85 miles round trip 6 days a week (until the pandemic) to work in SE Michigan (salt belt) 95% highway driving at 80MPH. When I drive in the city I use L the majority of the time. I also use it like a pickup truck and sometimes pull a small trailer with it when items won't fit inside.

BEST>CAR>EVER!
 

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Bought a 2015 with 92,000 miles. Car has spent its life nothern Ohio and NW Pennsylvania, lots of road deicer, salt and otherwise. The dealer replaced back pads and rotors "due to rust" before putting the car on sale. I've driven a few thousand miles since then and still see the cross-hatching on the rotors.
 
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Watch a video of a professional brake job, like any south main auto, and watch what you have to do to prevent this. It's not just about the sliders. The rust builds up under the hardware and has to be removed. If you have to force the pads to fit in the calipers, they won't last long. Performing a service like once a year would prevent the rusted rotors.
 

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2014 garaged volt, 96k miles, never replaced, matters not which mode used as I always cost or lightly apply brakes to get regen and during each ride cause some brake use to keep the rotors clean and not get too rusty...heck just from one rainy day from 1 day to an other I can hear the rust build up from backing out of my garage after just 1 day of sitting. So its a must. Also reason why I always use my parking power brake to keep it all moving!
 

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For us who live in colder climate with lots of road salt: weekly "hard braking in N" is best way to keep rotors from rusting. Californians will probably see their brakes live forever, but salt chews up things quickly.
 

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Compared to previous cars I have owned, the almost 10 years of service I got on the pads is amazing.
 
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replaced all brake pads and turned all rotors (due to rust/corrosion) at 212k miles
Would you mind sharing the labor cost and how many hours the car was tied-up for the four rotor turn service? I had guesstimated in my case that the cost for my new rear rotors and the time to remove and install the two of them would be less than the cost of their removal, turning (hoping they had enough thickness), and re-installation. Your data point in your case might make me re-think my estimating abilities.

... just from one rainy day from 1 day to an other I can hear the rust build up from backing out of my garage after just 1 day of sitting. So its a must. Also reason why I always use my parking power brake to keep it all moving!
I agree with one, and I disagree with the other.
Braking when driving in reverse appears to not use any regen, only hydraulics. I'm now in the practice of backing down my long-ish driveway, left foot on the brake pedal, right on the accelerator, any first departure of the day when rain, dew or car washing might have left liquid on the rotors. This at minimum wipes most off before it can really start to rust. This is a new habit I've begun since my rotor replacement this past autumn.
Setting the park brake before dew condensation will prevent moisture only on the section of the rotor that the pad contacts. I believe the pulsation I experienced with my old rotors was specifically exacerbated by being parked in one spot for several very rainy weeks while on vacation. Not setting the park brake might have provided less 'protection' to that segment of the rotor and would have caused at least a more even rusting of the entire rotor. I'd still have had rust, but no pulsing as the pad-protected rotor section passed the pads.
 

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145k miles, just did rear pads and rotors. Pads were down to just about metal (maybe 1/64" of material left) and rotors were trashed from rust.

Fronts appear to be brand new, I suspect they were done just before I bought the car.
 

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Today I was very upset to see my new (5k miles) rotors already scoring from rust here in NH. The car is garaged every night and driven regularly. I have even started using "N" to activate the friction brakes as I leave my neighborhood each day. It seems, for those of us in the salt belt, that there's no way around this issue with the Volt, at least not that I know of.
 

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Would you mind sharing the labor cost and how many hours the car was tied-up for the four rotor turn service? I had guesstimated in my case that the cost for my new rear rotors and the time to remove and install the two of them would be less than the cost of their removal, turning (hoping they had enough thickness), and re-installation. Your data point in your case might make me re-think my estimating abilities.
The labor cost was my own time other than the cost of having the rotors turned (~$50). I did it in 2 days because I was not in a hurry and had to drop off the rotors. All in, I spent less than 2 hours assembling and disassembling the 4 brake assemblies. I don't have a lift but I am a former mechanic with an abundance of tools. I hope that helps.
 

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I hope you guys are cleaning an lubing the Caliper Slider pins.
This was a failure point on two cars I have had. Salt Country.
Tesla has recently called this out in their scheduled maintenance.
I try to do it every two years or so.
Way more often than pad replacement, which goes without saying on EV's!(y)
EDIT:
From the Tesla M3 Maintenance Schedule:
Font Art Number Brand Rectangle
 

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I have a 2015 with about 65k on it. Had to replace rear rotors a year ago--they simply rotted away. The fronts aren't much better, but at least they pass inspection. The pads, however, look like new. We live in a hilly area and a brake job every couple years is pretty much par around here. Now I pull the calipers and grease the sliders. And smash on the brakes now and then.
 
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