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Yesterday, way too early in the morning, I was driving in Central Penna in a rather dense and pervasive fog. Water was condensing and dripping all over the exterior of the Volt as it cut through the fog at 40-45 or so mph. Suddenly the flat tire with exclamation mark light started flashing on the instrument cluster and a message popped up to service the tire pressure monitoring system. I acknowledged the message and looked at the TPMS screen, which showed dashes for both rear tires, but kept displaying the pressure for the front ones. After a few minutes the flashing light became solid and stayed on. Since the car kept handling normally I kept driving to my destination, plugged it to charge, visually inspected the rear tires which seemed fine, and went for breakfast. On a Sunday early morning no service place was opened so there wasn't much I can do.

By the time I came back the fog was gone and the sun was out. Turned on the Volt and the flashing TPMS light and message came on again. As I drove away the system reacquired the rear TPMS sensors, displayed the pressure, and the light went away. So I think that the fog or the condensed water may have screened the rear TMPS sensors or the receiver and the car eventually gave up trying to reacquire the signal (blinking to solid light). The front sensor readings still came through maybe because the receiver is closer to the front.

With close to 36,000 miles and winter coming the Volt is due for a new set of tires in a couple of months. I will keep an eye on the TPMS and ask service to inspect it when I go in.
 

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I had this happen on a clear day once, except it was only for my right rear tire (which, coincidentally or not, had had a flat a few weeks prior and been successfully patched... TPMS was very helpful that day). It lasted the entire 50 miles to my destination, but the system worked normally when I drove back home later that night. Hasn't happened again. Who knows?
 

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So I think that the fog or the condensed water may have screened the rear TMPS sensors or the receiver and the car eventually gave up trying to reacquire the signal (blinking to solid light).
I take it this is the first fog you have driven through with the Volt? Seems like it could be a coincidence. I have driven through heavy snow and never had this happen.
 

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Since both rear tire pressures disappeared from the display I would not suspect the sensors mounted in the wheels. It is pretty unlikely both would fail at the same time and then begin working again at the same time.

There has to be a common component causing loss of signals from the two rear tires. I am not familiar with the system components but perhaps there is a single rear mounted antenna/receiver for both rear tires. If there are individual receivers at each corner of the car than I would suspect wiring or a connector leading to those rear pickups was shorted temporarily due to the moisture.
 

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If there are individual receivers at each corner of the car than I would suspect wiring or a connector leading to those rear pickups was shorted temporarily due to the moisture.
There is one receiver and it's mounted in the black box on the windshield.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I take it this is the first fog you have driven through with the Volt? Seems like it could be a coincidence. I have driven through heavy snow and never had this happen.
Yes, this is the first time I have driven for almost an hour through such a dense and condensing fog. I have driven the Volt in rain and snow and I have gone through countless car washes. This is the first time this has happened, so before yesterday I could have said the same.
 
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Yesterday, way too early in the morning, I was driving in Central Penna in a rather dense and pervasive fog. Water was condensing and dripping all over the exterior of the Volt as it cut through the fog at 40-45 or so mph. Suddenly the flat tire with exclamation mark light started flashing on the instrument cluster and a message popped up to service the tire pressure monitoring system. I acknowledged the message and looked at the TPMS screen, which showed dashes for both rear tires, but kept displaying the pressure for the front ones. After a few minutes the flashing light became solid and stayed on. Since the car kept handling normally I kept driving to my destination, plugged it to charge, visually inspected the rear tires which seemed fine, and went for breakfast. On a Sunday early morning no service place was opened so there wasn't much I can do.

By the time I came back the fog was gone and the sun was out. Turned on the Volt and the flashing TPMS light and message came on again. As I drove away the system reacquired the rear TPMS sensors, displayed the pressure, and the light went away. So I think that the fog or the condensed water may have screened the rear TMPS sensors or the receiver and the car eventually gave up trying to reacquire the signal (blinking to solid light). The front sensor readings still came through maybe because the receiver is closer to the front.

With close to 36,000 miles and winter coming the Volt is due for a new set of tires in a couple of months. I will keep an eye on the TPMS and ask service to inspect it when I go in.
Hi vdiv,

I'm sorry to hear you experienced TPMS sensor issues. It appears you're just trying to share your experience with the forum members. When you are ready to take it to the dealership to have your tires replaced, please let me know if we can assist you in diagnosing the TPMS concerns you have. We are happy to provide an additional layer of support while working with the dealership.

Katie O.
Chevrolet Customer Care
 

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Take the back tire off and roll it up to the front of the Volt :)

The dealers tire setting tool can also check the battery in the TPMS

But as the ones the most distance from the receiving antenna had a problem for a short time in high fog les blame the wipers.
 
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