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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As mentioned elsewhere, it is a requirement for Bolt dealers to purchase a DCFC charger for the service department.
Although they will likely be used to routinely charge Bolts in for service, they are mostly necessary in order to insure that they are in a position to be able to test and if necessary diagnose DCFC issues.

The unit itself is interesting as it is a 25kW unit from Bosch which only requires a 240V single phase input (albeit with a service rated to handle a maximum of 138A input current)

The 24x18x10" enclosure is IP54 rated, can be wall or pedestal mounted and weighs 104lbs

WOT

 

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I couldn't find this particular Bosch dcfc online anywhere, but it looks identical to this one

http://www.evchargesolutions.com/Delta-EV-DC-Quick-Charger-Wallbox-p/deltadcfc.htm

So I'm guessing Bosch bought it and slapped their logo on it like they did with the SPX EVSE in my garage. With a price of $9999, it's really going to be hard for me to justify getting one from a dollars and cents perspective. Is there any info out there on how long it takes to fully charge a depleted bolt with one of these puppies, and whether charging on a daily basis might have long term effects on the battery? I'm probably not buying a bolt, but I do need to learn more about dcfc as GM preps my Subyukonade EV someday (oh please, oh please make it soon)
 

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I couldn't find this particular Bosch dcfc online anywhere, but it looks identical to this one

http://www.evchargesolutions.com/Delta-EV-DC-Quick-Charger-Wallbox-p/deltadcfc.htm

So I'm guessing Bosch bought it and slapped their logo on it like they did with the SPX EVSE in my garage. With a price of $9999, it's really going to be hard for me to justify getting one from a dollars and cents perspective. Is there any info out there on how long it takes to fully charge a depleted bolt with one of these puppies, and whether charging on a daily basis might have long term effects on the battery? I'm probably not buying a bolt, but I do need to learn more about dcfc as GM preps my Subyukonade EV someday (oh please, oh please make it soon)
Nice find. The unit in your link is a dual CHAdeMO and CCS unit. So I'd guess a CCS-only (or CHAdeMO-only) unit would knock a grand or so off the price. Delta is in Fremont, Ca - literally on the other side of I-880 from the Tesla plant.
 

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I read a 480v, 80 capable DCFC is required?
The tech specs say it is available for either 240v single phase, 208v three phase, or 480v three phase.
 

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Hmmm.....I've done the engineering for the new or remodeled facilities of several local dealerships, including Chevy and GMC dealers, the past few years. Most had 120/208 volt/3 phase electrical services. As noted by WOT, this takes a high-amp circuit to charge even at 25 kW and is not a trivial install on the input side of installation. Hope there isn't too much push-back by the dealers on this. This will definitely further limit the # of dealers nationally who are interested in selling the Bolt EV.

I suspect the quote about 80 kW DCFC being required at the dealers was a mis-quote or a mistake. There's no way most dealers could even install such a large single load. They'd need a new electric service, which is $$$$. GM probably is aware of that.

And to consider installing such a device (the Bosch 25 kW DCFC unit) at home? Go talk to your utility and your electrician before getting too excited.
 

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Daily charging with that high a current rate would shorten your battery life quite a bit, I am sure. Probably not a good idea.
 

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It only took a couple years for EVSEs to go from $1,000 to $300. I'll bet this goes from $10,000 to $3,000 pretty soon. At that point, it becomes viable for a home user. All ya need is a 400amp power entrance or a 200amp separate meter. Lol.
 

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Daily charging with that high a current rate would shorten your battery life quite a bit, I am sure. Probably not a good idea.
How do you figure? The Bolt is 60 kWh, so charging at 25 kW is about 0.4C. Charging is only a real concern above 1C. By comparison, the newest Superchargers can pump 135 kW into a 90 kWh battery, which equals 1.5C
 

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And to consider installing such a device (the Bosch 25 kW DCFC unit) at home? Go talk to your utility and your electrician before getting too excited.
Telsa's home HPWC (L2) can do 20kW if you have the optional dual charger onboard (a $2k option, last I checked). But yes, many homes cannot handle this without a costly upgrade, though the unit allows you to dial it down to whatever your house can handle. It's exciting that higher power options are becoming more affordable / available, though many homes aren't set up for it. Oh well, I'm still happy on my L1 at home and 3.3kW L2 at work (though I wouldn't mind 6.6 capability). I doubt any Bolt owners will spring $10k (plus upgraded electrical service) for home 25kW charging, but who knows (if I was rich enough for that, I'd just get a Model S).
 

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Nice! This is a way to fast charge the Bolt EV at home! Sure, it's almost 1/3rd the cost of the car, but for taxis, Uber/Lyft/Maven this would be great!
Except most uber drivers are using their existing cars to make a little extra cash. Plowing $40+K into a car and dcfc puts you way behind in turning a profit on your uber business. How many miles and hours do you need to donate before you turn a profit?
 

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Daily charging with that high a current rate would shorten your battery life quite a bit, I am sure. Probably not a good idea.
Not sure about the Bolt, since there's not history of it. However, there's a 200k mile Model S that shuttles people between LA and Las Vegas that's Supercharged thousands of times. Very little range loss on that car (6% loss.) And it's charged to 100% every day of its life.

Let's hope LG knows what they're doing and can at least match this: https://techcrunch.com/2016/09/29/tales-from-a-tesla-model-s-at-200k-miles/

Except most uber drivers are using their existing cars to make a little extra cash. Plowing $40+K into a car and dcfc puts you way behind in turning a profit on your uber business. How many miles and hours do you need to donate before you turn a profit?
This would also be for fleet-type operations where two full charges a day could net double the money. ROI can be had in less than a year.
 

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Not sure about the Bolt, since there's not history of it. However, there's a 200k mile Model S that shuttles people between LA and Las Vegas that's Supercharged thousands of times. Very little range loss on that car (6% loss.) And it's charged to 100% every day of its life.
No evidence that DC charging effected degradation in the Leaf as well. Some speculate it may lengthen battery life. Certainly doesn't seem to shorten it.
 

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It only took a couple years for EVSEs to go from $1,000 to $300. I'll bet this goes from $10,000 to $3,000 pretty soon. At that point, it becomes viable for a home user. All ya need is a 400amp power entrance or a 200amp separate meter. Lol.
It still won't be common. It won't change the average commute distance, so for the vast majority Lvl2 is MORE than enough, and Lvl1 is sufficient for a good chunk of home charging. The number of people buying Bolts for 125+ mile daily commutes (where Lvl2 for 8 hours might not be enough) is probably Erick and about another 100 households nationwide. DCFC just isn't needed for home charging for a daily driver. It's needed for long runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I read a 480v, 80 capable DCFC is required?
Required according to who exactly?
There is no such requirement.
The 25kW unit above IS the designated DCFC for the dealership.
(as well as an additional 7.2kW Level 2 unit also from Bosch)
And to consider installing such a device (the Bosch 25 kW DCFC unit) at home? Go talk to your utility and your electrician before getting too excited.
Right. There's not too many residences that could handle the addition of a separate service with 175 Amp breaker to support this charger.(without spending a LOT of $$) It's as much as another residence!


WOT
 

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Required according to who exactly?
There is no such requirement.
The 25kW unit above IS the designated DCFC for the dealership.
(as well as an additional 7.2kW Level 2 unit also from Bosch)
WOT
Guess this guy was wrong then?

http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/latest-reviews/drive-2017-chevrolet-bolt-ev-article-1.2891098

After debuting this year in California and Oregon, the Bolt will be rolled out in all 50 states—even the cold ones. About 1,200 of Chevy’s 3,000 dealers will sell and service the Bolt, and each must have 480-volt, 80kW fast-charging capability in the service bay.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Guess this guy was wrong then?

http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/latest-reviews/drive-2017-chevrolet-bolt-ev-article-1.2891098

After debuting this year in California and Oregon, the Bolt will be rolled out in all 50 states—even the cold ones. About 1,200 of Chevy’s 3,000 dealers will sell and service the Bolt, and each must have 480-volt, 80kW fast-charging capability in the service bay.
I guess so. (doesn't appear to be quoting a statement directly from GM)
Like I said, I'm going off the actual mandatory tool list for Bolt dealers.
WOT
 

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I guess so. Like I said, I'm going off the actual tool list for dealers.
WOT


Sooo.....what if a customer has an issue with throttled DCFC charging? How would a dealership test a fix in-house if they only have a 24 kW DCFC station? :p
 
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