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Have any of you had experience with DC Fast Chargers (480V)? I heard they can charge your vehicle in less than 30 minutes. If you have used them, how long did it take to get a full charge and what does it cost? Are there some locations that allow you to use for free? Seems like there aren't very many out there and if so are they available or do you have to wait in line to use it? How do you find them?
 

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DC Fast Chargers (CHAdeMO) only work for those cars that support it like the Nissan Leaf, Mitsubishi iMiEV, Tesla Model S with adapter, etc. The Volt does not support DC fast charging. If you are curious where they are located, you can use plugshare.com.
 

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Thanks for the info....seems odd that all EVs wouldn't share same platform....is there something comparable for Volt owners
?
 

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No, the Volt was designed for 3.3kW L2 charging. These days that seems kind of slow compared to many other PEVs with 6.6kW or faster charging. That was a decision by GM, probably mostly due to cost.

Possibly, the next version of the Volt will allow faster charging. To be honest, DC fast charging is more important for BEVs with larger sized battery packs that need to go longer distances and don't have a gas engine backup like a Volt.

There is also the topic of multiple standards. Currently there are three fast charging standards: CHAdeMO (oldest, Japanese-based, supported by Nissan, Mitsubishi, Kia, and a few others), Tesla Supercharger, and CCS (or Combo, newest SAE standard, supported by US and European car companies). Some fast charging stations will support multiple standards which should make things easier.
 

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It seems like MTN Ranger has all your answers pretty well covered.

When the i3 is released, it'll be the first EREV or PHEV to ever offer both a gas engine and DC Fast Charging (both are options, but it appears that some european i3's are equipped with both right now.)

Generally, DC fast charging is a weak substitute for refueling as a way to cover extended distances (granted, it has all of the EV benefits for the long trip,) and so PHEV/EREV manufacturers haven't felt it was worth the effort or money to offer - especially since there are currently three standards, each with their own communications protocols. The assumption has been that if you need to go somewhere quickly after you run out of charge, you'd run the engine (that's what it is there for, after all) - and buy more gas if you needed to.

The one thing a DC Fast Charge port would be really nice for is direct access to battery voltage - for a really good whole house "generator," for example.
 

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as a side note to the already thorough responses: the DC fast chargers can add range to a battery vehicle at a rate of 50 to 150 range miles per charging HOUR. I can add range to my Volt at a rate of 150 range miles per fillup MINUTE at any gas station in the country.... Excellent systems design the Volt is. DC fast chargers are a nice but not really effective substitute.
 

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Having used them I can tell you they completely suck. In reality DC "fast chargers" aren't very fast and, because of the way the cell technology works, you only get the rated speed when the cells are in the middle of the discharge cycle, not the top and bottom. We've had the option of either using the Volt or a DC fast charger several times and it's always a very easy decision. Driving at 70 MPH towards your destination beats sitting around in a hot car twiddling your thumbs any day.
 

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When the i3 is released, it'll be the first EREV or PHEV to ever offer both a gas engine and DC Fast Charging (both are options, but it appears that some european i3's are equipped with both right now.)
Incorrect :)

To my knowledge it would be Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV which been sold for two years already.. That is, in Japan. Europe got it since last autumn and US may get it in this year or the next (if Mitsubishi can produce enough to meet existing demand).
 

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Huh. I never realized the Outlander had a ChadEMo port. I'm still not clear on whether it is standard or optional.

It doesn't really make sense to me to provide it on a 12 kWh battery - surely the throttling for voltage limits cuts in pretty quickly to prevent overcharging cells, and you can't really drive it cross country as an EV anyway (not enough AER to be practical.)
 

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Having used them I can tell you they completely suck. In reality DC "fast chargers" aren't very fast and, because of the way the cell technology works, you only get the rated speed when the cells are in the middle of the discharge cycle, not the top and bottom. We've had the option of either using the Volt or a DC fast charger several times and it's always a very easy decision. Driving at 70 MPH towards your destination beats sitting around in a hot car twiddling your thumbs any day.
Mine charges the fastest, the lower it is. Between 10-50% is the fastest charging. It all depends on how well you can cool the battery during that big energy dump.
 

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Huh. I never realized the Outlander had a ChadEMo port. I'm still not clear on whether it is standard or optional.

It doesn't really make sense to me to provide it on a 12 kWh battery - surely the throttling for voltage limits cuts in pretty quickly to prevent overcharging cells, and you can't really drive it cross country as an EV anyway (not enough AER to be practical.)
I had to confirm for myself re. CHAdeMO on Outlander PHEV. I was shocked to see it. Take a look at the following Japanese video @ 3:50 mark: http://youtu.be/RH49Pbc9-5I

And looking at CHAdeMO locations in Japan (1,967! and 1,072 in Europe; 592 in the US) we can see why Mitsubishi equipped it with CHAdeMO http://www.chademo.com/wp/jpmap/

In fact, there seems to be very few L2 public charging in Japan if you look at Plugshare. Most are L3s. Very interesting...
 

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With an engine on board, my Volt is just fine with 3.3 KW for my schedule. If a new model comes out with 80 or 100 mile range, I would love 6.6 KW charging but hardly need it. Engine on board, remember? For those long trips.

Today, i drove 38 miles, came home to charge, charging for 3 hours to refill it and will repeat the trip. Rarely do I need anything faster.
 

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I had to confirm for myself re. CHAdeMO on Outlander PHEV. I was shocked to see it. Take a look at the following Japanese video @ 3:50 mark: http://youtu.be/RH49Pbc9-5I
Yup, that's definitely CHAdeMO in the video. Actually, there are a lot of things I like about the Outlander PHEV - which won't matter until they get around to actually bringing it to the US...
 

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Have any of you had experience with DC Fast Chargers (480V)? I heard they can charge your vehicle in less than 30 minutes. If you have used them, how long did it take to get a full charge and what does it cost? Are there some locations that allow you to use for free? Seems like there aren't very many out there and if so are they available or do you have to wait in line to use it? How do you find them?
The Volt cannot use a DC Fast Charger. The Volt does NOT have the DC charging connections nor onboard charging circuitry to allow DC charging.

The fastest charge possible on the Volt is about 4 hours.
 

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Huh. I never realized the Outlander had a ChadEMo port. I'm still not clear on whether it is standard or optional.

It doesn't really make sense to me to provide it on a 12 kWh battery - surely the throttling for voltage limits cuts in pretty quickly to prevent overcharging cells, and you can't really drive it cross country as an EV anyway (not enough AER to be practical.)
It's a standard option and provides a 80% charge on 30minutes. Since you can only drive ~30 miles on the battery (24 on 80%) it's not really practical on the road trips, but you get a small boost while stopping. If you had ChaDeMo charger on home, then it would give out a quick boost after work before leaving to shop, hobbies, ect. (but most likely due to the costs involved you would not have one).
 
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