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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

On my daily 38.5 mile round trip commute I drive 1 mile at about 10 mph, 1.5 miles at 35 mph, 2.5 miles at 45 mph and 33.5 miles at 55 mph with one stop light during the 35 mph portion of the drive and one stop at the access control gate during the 10 mph portion of the drive.

Here is a breakdown of my miles per kWh for the above commute at various temperatures from the beginning of the year until now.




Later,

Keith
 

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I call nerd!!! I can and habitually break that linear graph by using heat or AC and punching it. I used to track every single fuel station fillup and compute my per tank MPG, but at the 2 year mark I stopped tracking, slapped on some great looking rims and deep treadded stickier tires and now enjoy taking on/off ramps like a formula 1 racer, hitting my mark and accelerating out of the turns. I said to heck with efficiency, I'm having fun. I'm still getting over 70MPG despite not worrying about efficiency. But it's much more fun than driving like a grandpa.
 

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My spread is a bit wider than that, but my commute is 39 miles each way and I'm not going to drive cold for an hour before getting to work, I'd rather be comfortable and so my miles on EV pay the price.
 

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A car like to Volt shows it's Jeckell and Hyde personas in a single trip because the battery range is so so small, big shifts in effiency are easily noticed. Truth is even an ICE vehicle will perform the same way it just masked by its longer range.

And yes I'm still trying to eek out more miles per kWh than a normal person. I enjoy seeing a 6x daily on my GOM display. Call it CHEAP THRILLS.
 

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Heating use is a minor factor. The major factor is the electrochemical nature of the battery itself. Batteries move less charge at low temperatures:
 

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Hello I think that somewhere after 8o degrees the line starts coming down. Or less efficient after 80 something.

MPH and acccel is out of the graph. IF the drive is consistant. Not easy to do. Velocity will effect the graph more then just linearly, its a curve. I have links to the curve for Gen one but have not seen the graph for Gen 2. i would assume the curve is the same just offset from the GEN 1 curve. Of MPH vs Miles/KW.
 

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Nice work, but I have to deduct several points for a poorly labeled graph ;) (no axis labels, incomplete title)
 

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Nice work, but I have to deduct several points for a poorly labeled graph ;) (no axis labels, incomplete title)
I think the graph is self-explanatory. What wasn't there, that interests me, is the model year and the equation for the linear fit. Thanks for sharing the data Fourdoor.
 

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I think the graph is self-explanatory. What wasn't there, that interests me, is the model year and the equation for the linear fit. Thanks for sharing the data Fourdoor.
I take it you didn't go to engineering school :)
 

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A car like to Volt shows it's Jeckell and Hyde personas in a single trip
LOL, I feel the pressing need to reset perspective here again because people tend to get super-focused on the Volt and EV arena.

I used to commute with and still own a 97 Jeep Cherokee Sport. I still love it for the things I need it to do but by comparison the Volts efficiency is a blend of good Dr Jeckell and Willy Wonka and Glenda the Good Witch!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
My spread is a bit wider than that, but my commute is 39 miles each way and I'm not going to drive cold for an hour before getting to work, I'd rather be comfortable and so my miles on EV pay the price.
I don't drive with no heat / AC, I just don't have the climate control effects on this particular graph.

Heating use is a minor factor. The major factor is the electrochemical nature of the battery itself. Batteries move less charge at low temperatures:
This graph was to illustrate temperatures effect on propulsion efficiency, and the lions share of that is temperature effects on battery chemistry, so the graph is taken from propulsion use only, with climate control, and "a-typical days" (rain, traffic slowdown, etc.) factored out. I can make another graph with the climate control factored in.

Hello I think that somewhere after 8o degrees the line starts coming down. Or less efficient after 80 something.
Living in Mississippi I will have plenty of over 80F days to gather data from, I will be updating this graph throughout the year.

MPH and acccel is out of the graph. IF the drive is consistant. Not easy to do. Velocity will effect the graph more then just linearly, its a curve. I have links to the curve for Gen one but have not seen the graph for Gen 2. i would assume the curve is the same just offset from the GEN 1 curve. Of MPH vs Miles/KW.
Non-consistent days (got stuck behind a slow poke, rain, etc.) are factored out. I expect the graph to curve at the upper end as I gather more data as summer arrives. It may curve at the low temperature end as well, but I won't be able to gather that data living in Mississippi :)

Nice work, but I have to deduct several points for a poorly labeled graph ;) (no axis labels, incomplete title)
Making graphs in Excel sucks, I am just glad I was able to get the correct data.

I think the graph is self-explanatory. What wasn't there, that interests me, is the model year and the equation for the linear fit. Thanks for sharing the data Fourdoor.
Model year is 2016, I would expect the 2017 to be identical... not sure why it matters since this is posted in the 2nd gen Volt forum I didn't feel the need to say "this is a second gen volt" :) As far as the linear fit equation, I clicked on the data field and told Excel to add a linear representation of the data, you would have to ask a microsoft programer how it was done :D

Later,

Keith
 

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Nice work! Looks very linear. Just eyeballing it, the slope appears to indicate you lose about 3.5miles of range per 10 degree drop. My own experience is I lose about 4 miles of range per 10 degree drop. Then again, I run snow tires, so perhaps that additional drop is due to the higher rolling resistance.
 

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Since you did it in Excel, there's a way to add the linear equation as an overlay, then we can see the actual slope of the degree vs miles/kwh relationship.
 
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