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Consumer Reports reliability scores are based on survey data. The only problem is the failure to distinguish between different kinds of problem.

Reviews for any auto include the reviewer's biases so are only as trustworthy as the reviewer.
 

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Consumer Reports reliability scores are based on survey data. The only problem is the failure to distinguish between different kinds of problem.

Reviews for any auto include the reviewer's biases so are only as trustworthy as the reviewer.
How many people did they survey? What are their demographics? There's no transparency in CR data or how it is acquired. At least on review sites, you can see how many people actually reviewed the car, what were their actual complaints, etc.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
Consumer Reports reliability scores are based on survey data. The only problem is the failure to distinguish between different kinds of problem.

Reviews for any auto include the reviewer's biases so are only as trustworthy as the reviewer.

CR should weight the questions and give different point values to catastrophic and "tow required/leave motorist stranded" failures. Small things breaking, bad fit and finish, or body integrity issues may be irritating but they should be given a low point value compared to engine/transmission/safety hardware/etc. failures.

In addition, I have always thought that many people who buy American cars are more likely to complain to CR because complaining seems to fit the "junky American car/gas guzzler/land yacht/planned obsolescence" narrative so common from the 1970's and 80's.

On the other hand people that buy foreign cars and have problems with them are less likely to report them to CR because of the myth of the higher quality foreign car, the feeling of being a fool for overpaying for a status symbol (BMW, Mercedes), and the guilt of not supporting American industry (the "better quality" of imported goods myth justifies this). If the quality is not better, it is harder to justify giving all that money to economies outside the US when people need manufacturing and automotive engineering jobs so badly here.

Note that even if foreign cars are assembled here and have allot of domestic parts, almost all of the costly engineering is done in Germany and Japan and the very valuable intellectual property for these cars remains in foreign hands.

Imaging having numerous problems with a foreign car and feeling one would have been better off buying domestic. That person might be less likely to complain to CR than other folks with domestic car issues.

For all these reasons, the CR data may be skewed to over report domestic car problems and under report foreign car problems
 

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Disregard them


My 2016 has been flawless almost 3 years later. The 2019 can't be any less than my near perfect 2016
 

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Disregard them


My 2016 has been flawless almost 3 years later. The 2019 can't be any less than my near perfect 2016
I agree. One year flawless on our 2018. If anything, each successive year should be more reliable. The problems with my, first year in the US, 2011 Cruze were all ironed out and eliminated on newer models.

And for those who have had problems with their Volts, that's what the warranty is for.

And who among us would really rather have a Prius Prime, even if it is more reliable? Slow as molasses and only 25 miles of range on a good day? And about as ugly as ugly gets IMHO? No thanks!

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While I have not yet had a failure or problem that disabled the car, I have had MANY little issues and idiosyncrasies with my Gen 2 so I would say that CR is on target with their assessment...
 

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While I have not yet had a failure or problem that disabled the car, I have had MANY little issues and idiosyncrasies with my Gen 2 so I would say that CR is on target with their assessment...
Agreed.

I feel like as engineering and quality processes mature, catastrophic failures of drivetrains and cars is going down. But the added complexity of everything having numerous integrated digital controllers and computers in the car has made lots of little annoying issues very commonplace in modern cars. They're usually hard to reproduce and/or minor to the car operating so they're largely brushed off, but the annoyance persists.
 

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Here are the issues I had with my Volt 2016 in 3 years and 45k miles
- driver’s door lock/unlock button stopped working
- high voltage fuse blew up for no apparent reason.
- speed sensor on one of the wheels went bad. This caused some interesting moments with the car braking and accelerating on it’s own until I put it in neutral and held the brakes down. I was told that someone had a bad day on assembly line.
I’m not counting numerous issues with infotainment system which were addressed by few software updates.
Luckily all these happened before the warranty has expired.
I like the car but I don’t consider Volt a reliable.
 

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We can go back and forth with anecdotal evidence indefinitely.. Some of us have had many problems, some a few problems and some, no problems at all. (Knocking on wood now)

Go to PriusChat, or any other forum however, and you will find the same thing.



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2017, with 34k, no issues at all, tg. However there have been 3 recalls.

I wonder if cr factors recalls into their ratings?

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At least with today's news, Consumer Reports won't have the Volt to kick around much longer.

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I have a 2019 and it is simply too early to know if components are about to fail, go squeaky, or need repairs.

I suspect none will, but every car has its thing eventually.

The volt suffers from what many GM cars suffer-- average to poor interior quality. Panel gaps the size of a finger are hard to explain in the 21st century. But I was aware of the hard plastic, sharp unrefined corners, and dull styling before I bought the car. I bought the car due to functionality in drivetrain so I don't complain about interior sadness-- though it appears other new owners must have complained somehow or another to consumer reports.
 

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Well that explains it. Mary Barra must be a subscriber.

I dumped CR years ago. Worthless rag IMHO.

If you spent any time on the BMW i3 forum, you wouldn't buy one.
 

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Consumer Reports is no good for car related stuff.
Go elsewhere for better car information.
Car and Driver magazine is a good place.
 

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CR has suspect methodology.
 

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I quit trusting CR many, many years ago. They, like most of their review, are unreliable.
 

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This is a necro thread though, I think OP a few years ago meant predicted reliability was very low. The latest April 2020 reliability surveys are more promising, showing the 19s did well:

171894


Not that surprising, as the Challenger used to have crappy reliability, but FCA kept making essentially the same car for so long that they worked out all the bugs by now, and CR rates it as their highest predicted reliability sports car. Isn't that a bummer though that right when it seems they have things really polished, they go and close the plant where the car is made... doh!
 

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Car and Driver magazine is a good place.
Have you noticed that CR and C&D couldn't disagree more? Literally every vehicle that CR highly recommends gets horrible ratings on C&D.

For example, the Prius C is listed as CR's "highest recommended" category, and yet on C&D it gets a 2/10 score, the lowest they've awarded a car (never seen a 1/10, I guess they are saving it for a rainy day).

Likewise, I'm a little torn because the i3, which I do like the styling and suicide door on, has CR's high recommended with high predicted reliability and owner satisfaction, while well we know what they say about the 2019 Volt, but C&D loves the Volt and is luke warm at best about the i3.

One thing I am liking more about the Volt is that the Volt can operate as a parallel hybrid for greater highway efficiency, and for much greater range in hold w/ cruise control at 70mph which is great for my Houston to Dallas trips. i3 w/ range extender apparently can only run the generator on its small 2.4 gallon tank, that you have to pay to fully unlock and use on hold mode as its locked out on US versions, in serial mode and so only gets 30mpg when actually running on gas which isn't horrible but pretty bad compared to hybrids. But its range may be more forgiving in all electric for my 45 mile round trip from our new office (which has no chargers).

Another plus, BMW still seems invested in the i3, whereas GM has given up on the Volt and so a decade from now who knows how hard it will be to find technicians to work on it. Ditto with the Hyundai Ioniq that has a practical liftback like the Volt. Oh well, its good to have choices, even if it makes things difficult. ;)
 
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