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I am preparing for coming out of a lease of a 2014 Chevy Impala 2LT. I love the car but buyout is more than what cars are going for on the used lot. That being said, the wife and I are looking for TCO savings in the long run and have been intrigued by the Volt.

I have always been a Chevy owner and test drove the Volt yesterday. While moving from the Impala to the Volt seemed to be a step to a smaller interior, it didn't feel too small.

I am trying to gather as much information about making this decision as possible and would like to know what things I should consider when making the switch to the Volt. I drive 36 miles round trip to work, no charging station at work. Most of my driving is short distances in the city and some highway so making the move to electric makes sense and would provide some good fuel savings.

What is the impact on overall electric consumption from the house?
Cleveland, Ohio winters can be tough...how does that impact the battery charge or can the car withstand the inches of snow that can fall in the afternoon?

Anything from your experience in purchasing the Volt would be a great help in determining how to move forward.
 

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MY14 Volt owner from Minnesota here.

What is the impact on overall electric consumption from the house?
In the Midwest, electricity generally costs 1/2 to 1/3 as much as gasoline. So if you were previously spending $50/month on a fuel efficient gas car and you replace that driving with all electric you could expect your electricity bill to go up $15-$25 (while your gasonline spending goes to $0).

Cleveland, Ohio winters can be tough...how does that impact the battery charge or can the car withstand the inches of snow that can fall in the afternoon?
I've found the Volt handles snow better than the average front wheel drive car because of the extra weight from the battery and low center of gravity. Battery range in the winter can take a hit with very cold weather. Expect to see up to 40% reduced electric range from EPA estimate when it gets really cold.

I drive 36 miles round trip to work, no charging station at work. Most of my driving is short distances in the city and some highway so making the move to electric makes sense and would provide some good fuel savings.
You basically are the perfect use case for a Volt. You would be able to drive all of your work commute miles on electric range and you would also have the range extender there if you wanted to take a longer trip.

The one thing you're not considering is the driving experience of electric. Most people (including me) don't realize what a huge value this is until you own a plug in vehicle. Driving electric is incredibly smooth and is akin to a luxury car driving experience IMO.

Best of luck and from my perspective you are a good fit for the Volt.
 

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The Volt is an excellent daily driver. I leased a 2013 for 3 years, now I own a 2017 Premier. My round trip to work is 28 miles, and I only buy gas when I go on vacation. I don't charge at work and have no problem making the entire trip to work and back on battery. In the winter, the 2013 could just barely make it back home on battery. I suspect that your 36 miles in a 2017 would be about the same as my 28 miles in the 2013. The few times I had to drive it in the snow it handled beautifully just on the OEM tires.
Here in middle Tennessee, I pay about $0.11 per kWh. The Volt costs me on average about $25 per month for electricity. Did I mention that I love my Volt?
 
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