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I have been reading about how less expensive a Prius is compared to a Volt. But what struck me is that they always picked the cheapest Prius vs the Volt which comes pretty much maxed out with only a few actual options. So what I found on the Toyota web site is this. If you install all the matching options on a Prius the cost comes to MSRP* $34,360 that is only about $1640 dollars less then a Volt at a net cost of 36000 after tax credit. I know, I know, the real outlay before tax is $43,500. But we have to talk actual cost and the real price is after the Tax Credit.
 

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The mistake you are making PatsVolt is using facts. The people making false comparisons are not interested in facts, they simply want to support an anti-Volt position. These folks are joined by those who say the Volt is a lemon because it is over "$20k" I see this magic $20k number used frequently in Volt-bashing commentary. The average car price is $30K http://www.road-reality.com/2010/07/15/average-new-car-purchase-price-rises-in-2010/. So yes, the Volt is expensive, but so is the average for a new car. You make an excellent point about these comparisons.
 

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I have made the exact same comparison... about $1000 more with the options I chose on both (did you remember to add the remote start on the Prius 5? The Volt has similar functionality built in...). Of course... the one area the Prius wins is the adaptive LED headlights...
 

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I also looked at both after owning a Prius for 3 years. I had to take into account that I, along with many others, cannot deduct $7500 tax credit as there are few people that will get that full benefit. So I have to add about $2200 more to the Volt. But I am willing to do so.
I hate it when people said when I bought the Prius, "How long will it take for you to get your money back?" I replied "Alot less than it will for your leather seats in your Tahoe!"
Yes I am giving up 52MPG vs 37(est)MPG on long trips. But somewhere I/we have to make a start to phase 2 of going electric.
My question is: Why do we only compare the Volt to a Prius? It is the Tahoes and Expeditions that we need to get off the road, not the Prius.
GM never made a go of a Hybrid, Toyota did. So now we can all hold our heads high because GM has now come to the table with a winner.
 

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Yes I am giving up 52MPG vs 37(est)MPG on long trips.
FYI, I drove my Volt with cruise control stuck at 55 MPH for about an hour and a half on a sunny 30-degree day yesterday and got 46 MPG (true gas-only calculation, not counting electric miles). Would do even better if warmer. My experience yesterday was not far at all from what my Prius used to do in those conditions. If you can stand to keep is down to 55 MPH, it really helps. Of course the speed limit was 65 on the Interstate so there was a constant flow passing me.
 

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I also looked at both after owning a Prius for 3 years. I had to take into account that I, along with many others, cannot deduct $7500 tax credit as there are few people that will get that full benefit. So I have to add about $2200 more to the Volt. But I am willing to do so.
Why do you say most people won't qualify for the full $7500 credit? A single person with taxable annual income of about $46,000 or more will get the full benefit.
 

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FYI, I drove my Volt with cruise control stuck at 55 MPH for about an hour and a half on a sunny 30-degree day yesterday and got 46 MPG (true gas-only calculation, not counting electric miles). Would do even better if warmer. My experience yesterday was not far at all from what my Prius used to do in those conditions. If you can stand to keep is down to 55 MPH, it really helps. Of course the speed limit was 65 on the Interstate so there was a constant flow passing me.
If we drove 55 on the highways here is South Florida, we'd get run off the road. There's some crazy drivers down here.
 

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If we drove 55 on the highways here is South Florida, we'd get run off the road. There's some crazy drivers down here.
That's true...I have a tough time in traffic keeping it below 60 (which seems to be the spot where the green ball stays centered).

Steve in Boca Raton #313
 

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If you install all the matching options on a Prius the cost comes to MSRP* $34,360 that is only about $1640 dollars less then a Volt at a net cost of 36000 after tax credit. I know, I know, the real outlay before tax is $43,500. But we have to talk actual cost and the real price is after the Tax Credit.
Right - I did a quick compare and found a similarly featured Prius is $3K more than Leaf after 7.5K credit.

One thing to note though is, if you include the tax, Prius will come much ahead compared to Volt, since you pay the tax on full purchase price. Not a problem for us in WA, since EVs are sales tax exempt. Don't know whether that applies to PHEVs like Volt.
 

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If I were to buy a Prius, I think I'd buy used. Maybe a 3-year old one and then add in an Enginer aftermarket LiON pack to be a more Plugin variant of the original design. I can't see paying 30K for a Prius even though it is economical. With the Enginer packs in a Prius, a 55mph highway run would probably be even better for moderate commutes since apparently it allows better usage of the electric motor.

Thanks to those above showing actual MPG for Volt at 55mph. Indeed this was expected - well above 37mpg when going a bit slower than "highway speeds". Imagine the whole country could get 2-3 mpg more at least if they slowed down 5mph on the highway on their long commutes.
 

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I cannot confirm the $34k for the top end Prius out of laziness and lack of interest in the full-featured model, but the argument is flawed for a couple of reasons:

1. Not everyone *wants* the over-priced features on the Prius, and they have a choice to decline.
2. The high tech package on the Prius has features the Volt does not.
3. Up until the tsunami the Prius was discounted about 10%.

This entire argument is something of a catch-22. If price is a high priority then the low-trim Prius is the one people will look at, and in that case the Volt is much, much more expensive. I wonder what fraction of the US population will concurrently consider GM and Toyota cars ? I suspect only a few percent of Japanese car owners even bother to walk into a GM dealership when car shopping.
 

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Taxable income of $46k probably would. I am single and made about $52K in 2010. After deductions, it brought my taxable income down to about $37K or about a $5300 tax liability. So based on that I would only get a $5300 tax credit. But my credit will be for the 2011 year but not much will change for 2011 in my income.
Just maybe it will become a rebate very soon.


Why do you say most people won't qualify for the full $7500 credit? A single person with taxable annual income of about $46,000 or more will get the full benefit.
 

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EricLG makes good points. And as much as I've tried, it is impossible to price out a Prius with exactly the same features as a base model Volt. Nonetheless there is a commonly held belief that the Volt is much more expensive than the Prius when in reality a loaded Prius is only 1 or 2 thousand dollars less than a base Volt after tax credit (though the features comparison is apples to oranges).

It will be much fun to compare the Volt price with the plug in Prius price when that is released next year, especially considering the anemic 13 mile electric range of the plug in Prius, and the limitation of all-electric only at slow speeds.

I'm a fan of the regular Prius, and would recommend it over the Volt if you drive 75 miles a day and can't charge up at work. But I don't see great things for the plug in Prius as it is currently configured. After driving the Volt a couple months in Wisconsin winter, I find myself wishing for a plug in hybrid with a little more electric range than the Volt, not less!
 

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The 13 mile range of the PiPrii (Plug In Priuses) seems "ok" for some folks. If you go 13 mi on EV and then appx. 50mpg after that, it may help with those longer commutes - plug in at work, get 13 mile head start heading home. It would be much like you would get if they do something like that 20mi battery-version of the Volt. For me, I still want a Volt since it offers the substantial 40+ miles in CD mode in the summer and 40mpg on CS mode (since I don't drive much > 60mph). But I bet the Plugin Prius will be priced more like a top-end model Prius of today (34K+) since you will be "saving so much" with plugin mileage.

I wonder if Chevy can do something like the Prius with the Cruze? Put in some enabling electric motors and do a Hybrid Cruze with similar 13mi range and hybrid motoring? Could that be done for $25K out the door pricing?
 

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I'm a fan of the regular Prius, and would recommend it over the Volt if you drive 75 miles a day and can't charge up at work.
Are you basing the 75 mile crossover on gas, or gas+electricity? On just gas, even if you say the Volt has 35 miles AER and 35 MPG, at 120 miles that's still 49.4 MPG overall - or about the same as EPA Prius.
 

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And then I have had all the whimpy comments over the last 3 years of owning a Prius. Just like the Jeff Dunham comedy bit about a blue Prius. LOL
But my immediate family has 3 of them. Over 250k miles and hardly a problem.
But at least with a Volt I will be driving something a more stylish and manly.

I do agree that a Hybrid Cruze would be a good bet. The weekend I checked out a Volt in Atlanta, I drove a Cruze also. I was very impressed with both, except for the small back seat of the Volt. So maybe in about 3 weeks I can become an Ambassador (sorry AMC) for the Volt like all of my fellow Voltons here. (I thought Volton sounded better than Volties)
 

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Regarding the Volt's smallish rear seats, maybe there is a reason--exterior design.

The style of the Prius is a show-stopper for me. And while the silhouettes of the Volt and Prius may be similar, there is a HUGE difference: the Volt is 2.4" lower, 2.1" wider, and 1.5" longer. Whereas the Prius (to my eyes) has an awkward high/narrow appearance, the Volt has low/wide "prowling" look. One of my 13-year-old son's friends asked, "Is your dad's new car a race car?" I loved hearing that!

If smallish back seats were needed to enhance the Volt's sleek style, so be it. It's a great design decision in my view!
 

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Although the price comparisons are true, you CAN spend less money to buy a Prius (nice hubcaps, dude!), you can NEVER drive one without gasoline.
 

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I'm surprised that nobody mentioned the horrible driving dynamics of the Prius. It feels horribly disconnected and is a chore to drive. I'd never consider one just for that reason.

The cars I would cross-shop with a Volt would be an Audi A3 TDI (In Canada, diesel is cheaper than gasoline) or a Lexus CT200h, but I still have yet to try one of those.

Things are looking good for the volt though. My dealer says they will most likely get more allocation than expected. Which is good because they already have 8 people on the waiting list (I'm #2) and the cars won't arrive until August/September...

Luc
 

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Right - I did a quick compare and found a similarly featured Prius is $3K more than Leaf after 7.5K credit.

One thing to note though is, if you include the tax, Prius will come much ahead compared to Volt, since you pay the tax on full purchase price. Not a problem for us in WA, since EVs are sales tax exempt. Don't know whether that applies to PHEVs like Volt.
A Prius V plus the two big options (Nav and Tech, I believe they are) is $33.5K or so and includes a whole lot of fancy stuff that the Leaf does not have.

The idea behind the price comparison for a Prius II (which is usally the minimum level a dealer will stock) is that you *can* get one for $22.8K or so. The minimum Leaf, with whatever it's got, or the minimum Volt, ditto, has a much higher starting price and it's the starting price that ropes in the customers.

And do you want to reduce fuel use or play with dashboard gizmos all day? If you have a big interest in reducing oil or GHGs or whatever, you buy the minimum vehicle and spend the savings on insulating your house, adding SPV, putting up a windmill, investing in alternative energy companies or whatever. Those things, by the way, have their own payoffs, which leads to money for more toys (or investment) later.
 
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