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Recently purchased a 2012 Chevy volt. With winter approaching in Northern Indiana I’m curious what others have experienced in extreme cold temperatures? 0 degrees etc. Thanks
 

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1) You should keep the car plugged in as much as possible even when not charging. That lets the car keep the battery warm. It is OK if you can't do that.
2) When very cold, the engine will run a little even if you have battery charge. This is to help the heater/defroster performance. It is normal.
3) snowfall can accumulate in the charge port if left open. If not sheltered or cleared out, it can cause difficulty closing the port. Not a major problem.
4) handles well in the snow, but of course snow tires help a lot, like on any car.
5) you can preheat the cabin before departure, which helps your range (if the car was plugged in) and comfort.

Otherwise, it is pretty much the same.
 

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One more thing: Your electric range will drop off a lot in the cold weather. That is normal. Trying to reduce your use of the cabin heater will help with that, but much of the drop is unavoidable.
 

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If it’s cold enough outside, during your drive you may experience engine running due to temperature (ERDTT) even if you are driving on a full charge. There are personalized settings allowing you to select when this happens. Choose between Cold Outside Temperatures, ~35 F, or Very Cold Outside Temperatures, ~15 F.

Your 2012 Volt has no Hold Mode, but if it’s cold enough outside for ERDTT to occur, and if your commute or drive is long enough for your battery charge to drop to the ~4 bar level or below, you can switch to Mountain Mode then for heat.

Switching to MM, in effect, increases the battery’s "switch to gas" state of charge point to the 45% soc level on a 2012 Volt, about 20-25% above the usual "switch to gas" soc. When you switch to MM in a 2011/2012 Volt, the ev range estimate immediately decreases by ~14 miles. When it now reaches 0 on the revised displayed estimate, the car switches to gas, and the engine runs, providing cabin heat for your use from the engine.

Once the cabin is warm, switching back to Normal will restore those ~14 ev miles for use.

Keep in mind the battery supplies power for accessories as well as the motor, and in winter it takes more energy for various reasons than it does in summer to drive the same distances. The Volt’s ev range is cyclical - higher in summer, lower in winter. You will know it’s spring when your morning’s full charge range starts increasing.
 
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