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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If you need to inflate the tires or fix a flat, the owner's manual should be your primary reference. However, the PDF below may be easier to read. It can be printed and stored in your glove compartment with your Owners Manual, or saved to your phone. I recommend new Volt owners try out the air compressor to inflate their tires and familiarize yourself with the compressor operation before you really need it. (Do not test the sealant! It's a one-use canister that costs about $30 or so to replace. It's more of a last resort than first resort in my opinion.)

View attachment Volt-How-To-Use-Air-Compressor.pdf

According to data from the tire industry, 85 percent of all tire air pressure losses are the result of slow leaks that occur over a period of hours, days, or months. Only 15 percent are rapid air losses caused by contact with a road hazard, e.g., when a large nail that does not end up stuck in the tire punctures a tire.

Slow leaks may be caused by many factors. Tire manufacturers commented that tires typically lose air pressure through natural leakage and permeation at a rate of about 1 psi per month. Testing by CU supports those comments. In addition, tire manufacturers said that seasonal climatic changes result in air pressure losses on the order of 1 psi for every 10 degree F decrease in the ambient temperature. Slow leaks also may be caused by slight damage to a tire, such as a road hazard that punctures a small hole in the tire or a nail that sticks in the tire. NHTSA has no data indicating how often any of these causes results in a slow leak.
http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/tirepresfinal/safetypr.html

Mr Energy Czar's video shows the compressor being used.


Tire Plug Kit
Keep a tire plug repair kit in the car (Walmart, Autozone, etc.), along with a pliers, razor and a folded plastic sheet you can lay on if needed.
Here is a guide on using a tire repair plug kit:
http://www.alpharubicon.com/bovstuff/tirepluguzi.htm

Most tire plug kits seem consist of a sticky length of rubber that you thread through a large T handle needle. After removing the nail/screw you ream the hole and plunge plunge the rubber plug into the puncture. One thing I picked up watching the videos below: you probably need some rubber cement "lube" for the smaller holes!


Once at the tire repair shop, your plug can be removed the the tire repared with plug and patch:

A cool kit you can probably make:
 

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Thanks Steverino. I will store this in the glove box (along with the towing guide).
 
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Steverino,

Thank you for sharing!

-Ian Chevrolet Volt Customer Service
 

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your uploaded video is not playing correctly ....!!!
As I understand little bit from your description because I don't know the names of all of its parts so it is important for me to view the video but it is not correcly playing...!!!
can you replace the video file from the uploaded one?
 

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small update on the canister and where to search in the parts catalog
------------------------------------
Gmpartsdirect
Part Number was superceded!
Quick Order
Old Part Number 25913642
New Part Number 22937291
Part Name COMPRESSOR
MSRP $125.18
Online Price $78.11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sealer
17 ] BODY HARDWARE / REAR BODY & FLOOR / INTERIOR TRIM / Sealer


MSRP Online Price
$30.38 $18.00
 

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Nope. You give a part number to replace the entire compressor unit. ( 22937291)

He wants to know the part number for the tire sealant canister. (So do I).

I am having a devil of a time finding a GM part #.
 

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No - that is the search information path - you have to go to the item in this case sub item (17) click the purchase button.

The main unit is the one with a new part number

in some of the parts places the sub item is not (17)

I did NOT click on the buy and add it to the cart which may give a number.

you need to be in the catalog area.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Collision Catalog - 2012 - Chevrolet - Volt
body hardware, rear body & floor, interior trim, sealer $30.38 $18.00
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I still see no number even when in the cart.

not where I would have put it but you did have a collision with you tire on some object.
 

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UPDATE went Chevy dealer and bought a new sealant canister Part #20927667 $46.47 w/Tax OUCH!!!


Looked it up online $21.29 OUCH,OUCH!!!!
 

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Just for the people Googling for the replacement tire sealant canister part number: The number listed above has been superseded by part number 22864054 http://www.gmpartsdirect.com/results.cfm?singlepart=1&partnumber=22864054

The description is very useless as simply "Container" and there is no photo of the product so you won't get a warm feeling that you ordered the right thing until it shows up on your doorstep. Price is 18.35 plus 12.97 shipping as of 11/19/2014. For the extra $15, it might be worth the simplicity of just picking one up at the dealer...
 

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Just a quick reminder to everyone not to count on your tire goop inflator for all puncture repairs, and put together a tool kit in the car to deal with puncture flats.

My Volt seems very susceptible to flat tires compared to my previous vehicles, as I've had two flats in my first 6 months and 10,000ish miles with the car. Fortunately one flat lost the majority of it's air in my driveway, and the other happened near enough to my work parking lot that I didn't have to suffer at roadside for either one.

The lessons that I didn't fully learn after my first flat that I would encourage others to do would be to learn how to use the inflator before you need it, and to not rely on the tire goop to repair puncture wounds that a plug can repair. I was fortunate enough to have plugs and tools at home for the first event this summer, but had neither for today's flat in 30 degree F windy cold weather. It worked out because I had coworkers that thankfully came more prepared than I with tools and tire plugs, so we were able to plug the tire on the car. This turned what could have been a major problem to a minor inconvenience. Although I use a larger air compressor at home, the car's inflator was invaluable for me today!

Please put that emergency toolkit together and keep in in the car. Include a blanket if you're in a cold climate!
 

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Just a quick reminder to everyone not to count on your tire goop inflator for all puncture repairs, and put together a tool kit in the car to deal with puncture flats.

....
Please put that emergency toolkit together and keep in in the car. Include a blanket if you're in a cold climate!
I have thought about this too...had a slow leak just a couple months ago that I was able to have repaired at a local tire shop without any hassle on my part.

Based on your experience, what do you suggest?

I see two or three kinds of repair kits. One with a sort of rubberized pipe cleaner that gets shoved in with a tool, one with a rubber "stick" that gets shoved in and one with a larger tool and mushroom headed plug arrangement.
Do any or all of these work?
After you use them, what do you have to do next?
How much is a reasonable amount to spend on a "repair kit".
Finally, What do tire guys say if you bring in your "repaired with goop tire"? can they still plug it or is it new tire time?
 

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I have thought about this too...had a slow leak just a couple months ago that I was able to have repaired at a local tire shop without any hassle on my part.

Based on your experience, what do you suggest?

I see two or three kinds of repair kits. One with a sort of rubberized pipe cleaner that gets shoved in with a tool, one with a rubber "stick" that gets shoved in and one with a larger tool and mushroom headed plug arrangement.
Do any or all of these work?
After you use them, what do you have to do next?
How much is a reasonable amount to spend on a "repair kit".
Finally, What do tire guys say if you bring in your "repaired with goop tire"? can they still plug it or is it new tire time?
I've had good luck with the relatively inexpensive self vulcanizing rubber "pipe cleaner" type plugs that are about 3 inches long. Get a kit that has a separate rasp and plugging tool as shown in some of the videos above. For under $10 you can get that kit with a tube of rubber cement to apply to the plug before insertion into the puncture wound. This kit can only be used safely and effectively on the tread area of the tire, not the sides.

Additional tools not in the cheap kit that I will carry will be a small set of needle-nose pliers for extracting whatever ails the tire, and a small set of dikes to cut off the excess plug. I got a cheap set of these pliers for under $5, and may curse myself later for going cheap! The videos show razorblades or utility knives for trimming the excess, but I've never found it to be critical to get the plug cut off closer than 1/8" or so to the tire. The plug will flatten out reasonably well when driven, and I've never had one pull out.

I'd expect the mushroom headed plugs work just as well, but I haven't used them.

It is recommended to have the inside of the tire patched after using a plug for maximum protection. Some don't follow that step and it works out okay.

If you use the built in tire goop or fix-a-flat, you can expect the repair shop to be hesitant to patch the tire, mainly because of the extra time and material it takes them to clean the inside of the tire for the patch. In this case it would just be beneficial in some cases to get a new tire. They still should clean the rim with mineral spirits and such, but it's less work than the tire would be.
 

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Well today I had a flat tire. I followed the instructions on the inflator kit; and what do you know, the sealant didn't seal. I called OnStar and it took an hour to get someone out to me to have have the Volt towed to the dealer. The svc mgr said you know you have a flat tire? Isn't the inflator kit a wonderful piece of equipment? I spent 1 hr at the dealer getting a new tire put. Glad i bought the tire warranty with the car, and it has now pd for itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
the sealant didn't seal.
Given that the dealer put on a new tire indicates the old tire had an irreparable puncture. Not all punctures can be sealed or plugged, especially those on the sidewall or where the sidewall meets the tread. Depending on the puncture size and placement, the sealant can work, but I carry a tire plug kit in addition to the sealant. I also have a donut spare at home.
 

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2 days ago I had my first flat since 2000. I used the kit in the Volt and all was good. Just a reminder : after the sealant is put in your car, you have to drive the car for about 5 miles (8 km) before it sets. At least this was my experience and it is what is stated in the book.
 

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For those that use the GM tire sealant, the P/N 20927667 is now discontinued not sure if 25889433 replaces it or now only 23315606.
Looks like the tire plug kit is the only way to go or get it towed.
As the added expense of replacing the TPS sensor if you use the sealant and some tire places refuse to clean the sealant out so just sell you a new tire.
Interesting times.
 
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